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  • #31
    Re: Tapping into existing gas line

    This is from the 2006 NJ edition of the IFGC;

    Attached Files
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    Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
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    “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
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    • #32
      Re: Tapping into existing gas line

      Originally posted by Robert Gift View Post
      Is it not better to be filled when welding.
      Or can one completely remove all of the gas so there is no combustiblevel?
      Thank you.
      Propane tanks are filled to 80% so the weld will be on the vapor space either way. Propane is also only flamable between 2.4 and 9.6% mixture with air, so removing the gas is not needed either. The big thing is to be sure there are no leaks from the appurtenances.

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      • #33
        Re: Tapping into existing gas line

        Originally posted by blue_can View Post
        Thanks Rick - that's much easier than what I was thinking. Now here's one thing - the meter is on common property (ie HOA property) and so I cannot run the pipe underground from where the meter is. I will need to run it into the garage (which is what is on the other side of the wall) and at the end back out into my yard. I can cut open the drywall and run the pipe through the wall. It will be easier to run an exposed pipe against the wall but I'm not sure that's to code and if not it will fail inspection.

        Is the pipe around the meter galvanized pipe - it looke like it but I thought galvanized was not allowed for gas. Or is it regular black steel with some anti-corrosion coating.

        A separate valve for the new branch is definitely a good idea.

        I'm guessing it would be a good idea to replace the union washer while doing this.
        There are no codes against running gas line exposed on a building. Astetics may be another issue though. You do have to protect the pipe from the elements ie paint, wrap, whatever.

        Galvy is what you have there and is fine outside. Some people will use that inside too, I DO NOT and I am not going through that one again.

        The union gasket on the meter is most likely in good condition and may be reused. As you can imagine the size of the gasket and type are not your local hardware standard. You could mention something to a gas tech running around and get a spare from him, but they start acting funny when people are messing with their meters.

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        • #34
          Re: Tapping into existing gas line

          the rubber washer is fine 99% of the time. gas company will change it if it leaks. as far as the pipe of choice, gal pipe is fine and you don't have to paint it. black is also fine, but will need paining as it exits the building. of course factory wrapped pipe/ green or brown, is required underground at a minimum of 12'' depth of coverage. make sure to properly prime and tape all joints and nicks.

          it's probably wise to hire a good local plumber that can assist you and you'll save plus get an education. have them come by and discuss it, show you where to dig and get things prepped beforehand.

          i would consider it, but piper's mom is still a little bummed from last road trip. there are a handful of guys on the forum that are closer too.

          rick.
          phoebe it is

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          • #35
            Re: Tapping into existing gas line

            Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
            as far as the pipe of choice, gal pipe is fine and you don't have to paint it. black is also fine, but will need paining as it exits the building.
            rick.
            The threads of galvy pipe should still be painted or protected. Not the whole pipe. The zinc has been cut away there and will rust if not.

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            • #36
              Re: Tapping into existing gas line

              I thought I have read on the web about flecks of zinc coating coming off the galvanized pipe and getting into the gas valve orifice and causing problems. Not sure how true that is. And yes exposed pipe is not pretty and is better concealed. I did that when I installed my water softener some years ago - opened up the drywall and ran the pipes to the softener and then repaired the drywall. Most of my neighbors who have softeners have exposed pipes.

              Probably best to take the time and run the pipes internally.

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              • #37
                Re: Tapping into existing gas line

                considering us west coast guys have installed enough gal pipe to stretch to the east coast, i've yet had to clean a pilot orifice that was dirty due to anything except moisture from an underground leak.

                gal pipe is 100% fine and legal to use out here. gal pipe is also more difficult to properly paint as it needs to be properly cleaned and etched for the paint to properly bond. if anything i spray zinc rich primer on my exterior cuts at the threads.

                trying to run steel pipe in the walls after the fact can get tricky and will require over sized holes unless you're running with the studs/ joist.


                rick.
                phoebe it is

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                • #38
                  Re: Tapping into existing gas line

                  Yes, actually for this pipe it is going to be tricky. I did not have the same issue with the softener since the pipe came out at the 90 deg bend in the wall and I had enough room to insert the full length of copper pipe without having to cut it up. Trying to insert it into the wall cavity directly is hard due to the studs. I have a framing drill with huge torque that can make the holes in studs for running pipe.

                  Maybe CSST is another option. I have read mixed reviews about this online and even here there is a recent thread about this. Plus it seems like you have to be certified to install it. I read the manual for one of those (Tracpipe I think) and it's unclear why you need to be certified to make a connection - the procedure seems fairly straightforward.

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                  • #39
                    Re: Tapping into existing gas line

                    Originally posted by blue_can View Post
                    Yes, actually for this pipe it is going to be tricky. I did not have the same issue with the softener since the pipe came out at the 90 deg bend in the wall and I had enough room to insert the full length of copper pipe without having to cut it up. Trying to insert it into the wall cavity directly is hard due to the studs. I have a framing drill with huge torque that can make the holes in studs for running pipe.

                    Maybe CSST is another option. I have read mixed reviews about this online and even here there is a recent thread about this. Plus it seems like you have to be certified to install it. I read the manual for one of those (Tracpipe I think) and it's unclear why you need to be certified to make a connection - the procedure seems fairly straightforward.
                    CSST is great stuff!!! It should be installed by one who has passed the test because some of the brands are listed for concealment. That becomes an insurance issue. Of the brands available, only TracPipe has the same BTU load as steel pipe because they use a higher EHD (equivalent hydraulic design). TracPipe is the only CSST I will run. They other brands will cause you to run larger pipe size and higher cost of fittings. CSST is going to be the easiest way to run across wall studs and with a smaller hole. On the TracPipe side they have a product called Counter Strike that is black shielded and is designed to dissipate lightening strikes before the pipe can be damaged. By code it should still be electrically bonded. In your situation it is the perfect pipe to be ran by a certified installer.

                    You will still need to add striker plates and be aware of the pipe when mounting things in the garage. Take pics of the pipe with a tape measure in view so that you will avoid any future issues. CSST in your case equals less time to install, smaller holes, and stronger structural integrity upon completion.

                    You will also have a joint, only at the exterior of the house if done right.
                    Last edited by Kevin Jones; 06-21-2010, 08:52 PM.

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                    • #40
                      Re: Tapping into existing gas line

                      csst running through 2x4 studs is not a good choice as it will all have to be sleeved in steel flex and hardened striker plates. there is no way to allow for the play that's required when in a wall crossing studs.

                      honestly the best way is to run it exposed or run it up above the joist if they are open and then back down. i wouldn't advise drill your studs on a 2x4 wall.

                      running csst is pretty simple. it's the codes and requirements that require the knowledge and expertise.

                      rick.
                      phoebe it is

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                      • #41
                        Re: Tapping into existing gas line

                        Thanks for the replies Kevin and Rick. I'm currently thinking on how to do this part of the project - in addition to the gas line the design of the firepit itself.

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                        • #42
                          Re: Tapping into existing gas line

                          Cool...now for the fun stuff. What are you thinking?

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                          • #43
                            Re: Tapping into existing gas line

                            Okay so it is done



                            A big thanks to Rick and Kevin for all the input.

                            I have quick question - in spite of my best efforts I have ended up smearing dope on some sections of the pipe. Any suggestions for cleanup.

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                            • #44
                              Re: Tapping into existing gas line

                              soapy water or simple green.

                              is that tee and plug in the original position as you found it?

                              normally the the tee branch is to the meter and the plug is at the opposite end of the house line. this allows the gas company to bypass the meter and still supply gas to the house so they don't need to light anything if you're not home.

                              never seen them do it with the plug on top. maybe they have a different setup than we have

                              rick.
                              phoebe it is

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                              • #45
                                Re: Tapping into existing gas line

                                looks like you did a real nice job keep up with the good work
                                SMELLS LIKE $$$$$$ TO ME

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