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Damaged threads on pipe

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  • Damaged threads on pipe

    Just got started and found this. This is from the end of a 10' pipe and this thread was already on the pipe (made at manufacture). I removed the red cap off the end and found this.

    Any easy fixes? Or do I need to get a hold of a die and turn it over to clean the threads.


  • #2
    Re: Damaged threads on pipe

    Pretty minor and it's on the starting thread so either hit it with a file or chase it if you have to
    sigpic

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    • #3
      Re: Damaged threads on pipe

      triangular file will clean that right up.

      even a little hacksaw blade will work if need be to dress the thread.

      what are you doing to thread all the pipe?

      are you getting it threaded at h.d. or renting a machine?

      i can sell you a nice machine for a good price and you could do it all

      electric or manual either one.

      rick.
      phoebe it is

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Damaged threads on pipe

        Got started with the coated (outdoor) pipe initially. Mapped the layout and went to HD and they cut and threaded the pipes on a Ridgid machine.

        Maybe I should buy your machine so I can start practicing to beat 66 secs . I want to do it in 50 secs .

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        • #5
          Re: Damaged threads on pipe

          problem is it was all manual, not electric.

          remember it had to be cut, reamed, oiled, threaded and screwed

          in 66 seconds but i should have taken my time and shot for 69 seconds

          not something you would do in the real world. but a contest brings out the beast in us

          rick.

          make sure you wrap all the jaw marks and machine marks along with the fittings. tape primer and 1'' 10 mil tape is the easiest to work with.
          phoebe it is

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Damaged threads on pipe

            That's pretty impressive - I thought that was the time on the electric machine. You should have seen how long it took the guy at HD to cut and thread the pipes on the Ridgid machine . I was wondering whether we would ever get finished - while a long line of people formed with other requests.

            I got some tape also at HD - but I think it says it is 20 mil - not 10. For some reason I could not find ay primer there so I need to find a local plumbing supply place that sells it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Damaged threads on pipe

              we are required to have a 20 mil layer. but we find it much better to use 2 layers of 10 mil and 1'' tape is required on the fittings so it can be drawn tight.

              the primer should be in a 1 quart can i believe with a yellow label. most likely collecting dust price is about $12.00

              primer feels nothing more than contact cement. buy some disposable 1'' wide brushes for under $1.00 and brush on the primer around the fittings and damaged coating. you should test the line before you prime and wrap but around the wrench marks it can be done prior to testing. digging out around the fittings will make it easy to spin the tape.

              rick.

              photos score extra points
              phoebe it is

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Damaged threads on pipe

                Yes, I was not planning to wrap the fittings until the system has been tested. My plan was to complete the pipe run and then conduct the 10psi pressure test. Once that passes I will do the gas hookup and then connect the manometer to the other end, measure the pressure, shut off the branch valve and see how long it will hold pressure. Also check for leaks at the same time. Once this is done and passes I will wrap the fittings. Not sure if there is a specified time for test 2 - I just ordered the 2009 gas code and handbook - I will check in there.

                I was planning to line the trench with plastic sheet to avoid contaminating the pipes.

                I will defnitiely post pics. I already have many pics of the yard remodel which as so far included plumbing for the irrigation, electrics, concrete, stone, plants and landscaping, drains etc. I suppose I should post pics of the drains on the drain thread.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Damaged threads on pipe

                  Got the thread filed as suggested - turned out to be very quick and easy and then the fitting went on .

                  So I have another question about running iron pipe. If I were running it flush against a wall how would I connect a 90 deg fitting at the end since to turn the fitting the wall will be in the way of the right angle end. Some trick to doing this?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Damaged threads on pipe

                    either pre fab it on or just dont strap it tight at the last couple feet so you can put a wedge in there to pry it out.

                    this is 3/4'' pipe, correct?

                    you only need 1'' and that's easy.

                    rick.
                    phoebe it is

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Damaged threads on pipe

                      Yes 3/4". I was not sure if iron pipe would have enough flex to pull out like copper or plastic - sounds like I can pull it out in order to turn the fitting. I will pre-fab as much as I can though.

                      Thanks .

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Damaged threads on pipe

                        Does anyone here incorporate cathodic protection for buried and coated steel pipe such as the use of a magnesium anode. Just wondering if that's something I should do but I'm not sure if it's worth doing or not.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Damaged threads on pipe

                          don't do it. the pipe is already coated. the city protects their underground.

                          rick.
                          phoebe it is

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Damaged threads on pipe

                            Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
                            don't do it. the pipe is already coated. the city protects their underground.

                            rick.
                            If you are on your own pipe line after the meter and install a dielectric union...you are not on city protection.

                            I don't expect people who haven't really done it to understand.

                            Propane systems work this way and so does your steel pipe underground. The pipe is no different in concept as a steel tank. With all the bonding that is going on we are actually sending the full potential of the house back to the ground and right to that steel in the ground. Do water heaters have anode rods just for fun? I think the manufacturer saw something a long time ago.

                            It is not only a requirement based on the system you may have...LP.
                            It is an extra step that may cost $100 to never dig in your lifetime if the wrap fails. The city is not laying your pipe they have no responsiblilty.

                            Do it or don't. But if you do...you must use a dielectric union.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Damaged threads on pipe

                              I guess I did not understand some of Kevin's post. So you are saying this should only be done if there is a dielectirc union somewhere between the city incoming pipe and the house pipe. If that's the case I assume the house pipe is another metal since there is no point of using a dielectric union otherwise - or is there?

                              Do it or don't. But if you do...you must use a dielectric union.
                              I did not follow this. Where and why?

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