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Sump as secondary way to pump out weeping tile in a flood.

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  • Sump as secondary way to pump out weeping tile in a flood.

    Hi,

    My parents live in an area where there has been 3 floods in 15 years. The first two times they did not have back flow valves but the third time they had two. One storm sewer and one sanitary. These are not the cheep do it your self ones. They were both installed for about $4000 total.

    The third time they were flooded the neighbors had about a foot of water in the basement but my parents had none. Then near the end of the storm in 30 min or less they got about 6 inches of water. There was an investigation and it was determined that the valves worked but the water table rose above the slab.

    Just recently the city said it would pay to have pumps installed so a contractor was called. Needless to say I think I know more about the situation then the contractor does. It looks like they are going to back out of a half done job because they don't want to connect the sump pit to the weeping tile.

    Recap:
    My parents got 6" of water (4000 US Gallons in 30 min or less) because of the water table rising.
    The sump pump must be tied directly into the weeping tile.
    The sump liner that was going to be installed is 24"x24"x24 with holes.
    We were going to install two 70 GPM submersible pumps into the sump pit.

    So here are my questions...
    For this situation is a pedestal or a submersible better?
    Is 140 GPM (US) enough or is it over kill?
    Is a 24x24x24 pit to big?
    Should the pit have holes in it to collect water under the slab or not?
    Should I bring in two 4" pipes from the tile or just 1? (Thought 2 might be better so water could fill the pipe from each side..)

    Any expertise would be appreciated as I do not trust the contractor any more. We will find out if they will continue with the job tomorrow morning.

    Thanks, Matt

  • #2
    Re: Sump as secondary way to pump out weeping tile in a flood.

    Just wondering where in Canada are you located?

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    • #3
      Re: Sump as secondary way to pump out weeping tile in a flood.

      Hi,

      We are in Ottawa.

      Matt

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Sump as secondary way to pump out weeping tile in a flood.

        If i was going to put in a pump for a backup
        I would use the 140 gpm and blow it on top of the ground into the back yard
        And hope the power dont go out

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Sump as secondary way to pump out weeping tile in a flood.

          30 min, 4000 gal... 133 gpm, no?

          140 gpm capability seems not at all out of line, maybe even not so safe.

          mostly, where oh where is the water going to go?

          you throw it out somewhere it can come back, you are just pumping a loop, not removing anything.

          what, if anything, was still draining... where, if anywhere, was there still some drainage at time of flood?

          see my thought? all the gpm capability in the world doesn't really help unles you've got somewhere to throw it.
          This is my reminder to myself that no good will ever come from discussing politics or religion with anyone, ever.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Sump as secondary way to pump out weeping tile in a flood.

            Thanks for the replys guys! After going to the local plumbing store and talking to the guys there combined with what you have just said here is what I have come up with after working my brain all night.

            My parents have a large backyard. The water could be piped to the back of the yard where there is a bit if a grade away from the property. The ground is mostly clay so it should not come back. I am thinking about one 55 GPM sump pump and one 170 GPM sewage pump. (I have calculated in the head.) I'll see if I can find a piggyback switch for the 170 GPM that will start closer to the top the pit and not shutoff until it hits close to the bottom. That way it can run in longer cycles. (The guy at the plumbing store said the short cycles will kill the pump.)

            So what do you guys think?

            Matt

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Sump as secondary way to pump out weeping tile in a flood.

              yes, i agree about hooking up weep tile to pit. they are all done that way in indiana. the idea is to get the water away not to drain the basement. definitely run the water away from house. go back to plumbing house and get your switch. pick their brains about switch and then buy it. it's their lively hood and expertize unlike the people at mr big box store, who doesn't know. and will not be there next time you visit. get a new plumber. breid...............

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Sump as secondary way to pump out weeping tile in a flood.

                Here in Winnipeg all new construction for years has had to have a backwater valve and a direct connection of the weeping tiles drain to a sump.

                The city encourages existing houses to install a backwater valve on the main line and connect an overflow line in from the floor drain to a new sump pit to take the weeping tile water when the backup valve operates.

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