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  • Overall advice on a supply water line

    I have read a lot on this forum and appreciate what I have read, and now I would like to ask a question. I built a cabin about 1300 feet from my parents house. Pretty level area and I put a shower and toilet and sink in it. The cabin is for me and my wife and I'm going to trench about two feet deep and put in a pex water line. Now some people have told me I can get by with 3/4" and some say you better go 1". What do you guys think I can get by with? First this will be coming off city water and I think It will start out with 100 pds of pressure. I plan on putting a regulator at my cabin before it goes in to the plumbing there. Don't really need a lot of pressure just enough to knock soap out of your hair, but I also only want to do this once. Here is what I was going to do. By 3/4 inch by 500 foot rolls of Everhot pex-b so I would have but a couple of joints. Or would the recommendation be to go with the 1" in 300 foot rolls. Also do you think Everhot pex b is as good as any to go in the trench. Thanks Rick

  • #2
    Re: Overall advice on a supply water line

    It all depends on the size if the water meter. Do you have a dedicated
    meter for your cabin or will you be tying in to your parent's house line?
    You're talking about running a quarter mile of piping. On inch would be
    minimum. Volume as well as pressure will be an issue. You may need a booster pump. Personally, I would use PVC instead of pex.

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    • #3
      Re: Overall advice on a supply water line

      Thanks Big Jim why would you use PVC instead of PEX? Also I would tie into my parents water line right out of the meter before it goes to there pressure regulator. There meter is 3/4 so I would switch to one inch at the begining and switch to 1/2 before I go into cabin.

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      • #4
        Re: Overall advice on a supply water line

        Assuming 1,300 ft of pipe, no measurable elevation increase, not fittings, valves, etc calculated, and using plastic pipe:

        At 4 GPM flow rate at cabin 3/4" loses 4 PSI per 100' so 52 PSI total, leaving you with just under 50 but probably 35 with items installed

        At 4 GPM flow rate at cabin 1" loses 2.2 PSI per 100' so 29 PSI total leaving you with 71 but probably about 50 with items installed

        Be careful with the rise part though, even though elevation may look minimal, you will lose 2.31 PSI for very foot cabin is above supply on top of figures above which may lead you to using 1-1/4" pipe.

        Booster pumps at cabin may help but cant suck much more than 10 PSI or 1 GPM at that distance and unless storage is added, wont help much besides costing you energy.

        Figures above aren't exact but close enough with info provided.

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        • #5
          Re: Overall advice on a supply water line

          Thanks Lee H for that, I can see now where it will benefit me to go with 1". Why the need to go with plastic pipe over Pex??? Rick

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          • #6
            Re: Overall advice on a supply water line

            A few years ago we had to run a water line up a Mountain 720 feet. We used 2" poly pipe for this job, but it also was for a 2 1/2 bath house with kitchen.

            1,300 feet is a long way...I think 1" is too small.

            If you only want to do this once, there is nothing wrong with going BIG for volume. Who's to say one day that you might add something else that will require more water volume.

            You're doing this yourself and the pipe isn't that expensive.

            I'm a Poly-pipe fan versus PVC.
            Last edited by Flux; 08-04-2010, 09:13 PM.

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            • #7
              Re: Overall advice on a supply water line

              I also feel 1" PEX would be to small. 1" PEX is roughly the same inner diameter as 3/4" copper pipe. If it was me, I'd be looking at 1 1/2" or 2" pipe for that long of a run.

              The only thing worse then digging a 1300 foot trench once is doing it twice.

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              • #8
                Re: Overall advice on a supply water line

                PVC is easier to work with, IMO, and more durable for underground.
                Just lay out your pipe lengths next to your trench, glue 'em up,
                and kick 'em in the ditch. With PVC fittings you maintain a full flow
                as the I.D. is not reduced, whereas pex uses insert fittings.

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                • #9
                  Re: Overall advice on a supply water line

                  The trenching and covering it all up is the job
                  Dont go small with the pipe

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                  • #10
                    Re: Overall advice on a supply water line

                    1" PEX with 1" meter should be fine.
                    1" Polyethylene 160 psi is also good. 1" meter.
                    1" PVC will also be fine. Thicker wall though. 1" meter.

                    You're only running 1 sink, 1 toilet, 1 shower if I read correctly.



                    I have no experience with Everhot PEX-B. PEX-B is NOT inferior to PEX-A. Just an industry labeling standard. I use Vanguard/Viega Ultra PEX.

                    Did anyone (the plumbers reading) know you can get Uponor up to 2" last I checked?

                    You don't need that size though.

                    Good Luck.

                    J.C.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Overall advice on a supply water line

                      ALWAYS GO LARGER ! For a few bucks, You'll have no regrets !
                      I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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                      • #12
                        Re: Overall advice on a supply water line

                        Guys I really appreciate your help and I thank all of you for your replies. The meter I will be going off of is 3/4 not 1" I have done the math and It looks like If I ran 1" pex for 1300 feet I will pay .50 a foot. A good friend of mine that has access to 2" x 20' shedule 40 slipjoint can get it for .68 a foot. I think that will cost me 300 dollars more. So I think to be on the safe side I will spend the 300 more and go with 2" PVC. Who knows I may need more water one of these days. Rick

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Overall advice on a supply water line

                          Originally posted by ricky b View Post
                          Guys I really appreciate your help and I thank all of you for your replies. The meter I will be going off of is 3/4 not 1" I have done the math and It looks like If I ran 1" pex for 1300 feet I will pay .50 a foot. A good friend of mine that has access to 2" x 20' shedule 40 slipjoint can get it for .68 a foot. I think that will cost me 300 dollars more. So I think to be on the safe side I will spend the 300 more and go with 2" PVC. Who knows I may need more water one of these days. Rick
                          You're a wise man !
                          I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Overall advice on a supply water line

                            Now another question on the PVC Pipe. I'm going to trench the 1300 feet and someone told me to go with slip-joint pipe instead of gluing it. They said the gluing may work its way loose as the ground shifts, but the slip-joint is a little more forgiving with ground movement. Now if this is the case I can see going with slip-joint, but it's twice the price as regular glue in PVC. Can someone give me some advice to this part of the equation. Thanks Rick

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Overall advice on a supply water line

                              I have a few pasture livestock tanks, and when I put them in the Farm Service Agency I think recommended a min of 1"PVC, I think we used 1 1/4" pipe, and we glued it all, I was told to snake it in the trench, the soils are sand for the most part.

                              there are two factors, I see, one if your below frost level (in our area 4 foot down), and your water is of a even temperature there should be little expansion and contraction of the pipe the S weave of the pipe in the trench will let it have a little give VS. a straight run,

                              the water run I did were about half mile each, the first one I used PVC on and the second I used (NSF approved) Polly pipe in rolls,

                              the PVC pipe has been in close to 20 years and no problems, the PVC is a pressurized line from the booster pump in the well house, from the storage tank,

                              and the ploy is the line from the south windmill to the house, and as the wind mill pumps there is some pulsation (even tho there is a air expansion dome at the wind mill, to lessen the pulses of the windmill pumping, it is a little over 1/2 mile and some elevation rise about 30 feet, it has been in over 10 years and no problems, it is a 1 inch line as well,
                              this line is gravity feet in reverse, back to the windmill, and only pressurized by the mill coming this way,
                              Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
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