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  • Copper and Galvanized Question

    I'm in the process of swapping out the galvanized pipes in our recently purchased first home. Sometime in the past a previous owner replaced two long runs (about 20 feet) to/from the water heater with copper plumbing. The previous owner went directly from galvanized to copper and it has corroded quite badly, no surprise. The main bathroom was redone in copper but the remaining plumbing (kitchen, 1/2 bath) is all galvanized.

    My question is, can I use the existing copper lines or while I have the walls open should I replace the copper and start all new. Best I can tell the copper was installed between 1997 and 2000.

    Any advice would be welcome.

  • #2
    Re: Copper and Galvanized Question

    Originally posted by NeedAPlumber View Post
    I'm in the process of swapping out the galvanized pipes in our recently purchased first home. Sometime in the past a previous owner replaced two long runs (about 20 feet) to/from the water heater with copper plumbing. The previous owner went directly from galvanized to copper and it has corroded quite badly, no surprise. The main bathroom was redone in copper but the remaining plumbing (kitchen, 1/2 bath) is all galvanized.

    My question is, can I use the existing copper lines or while I have the walls open should I replace the copper and start all new. Best I can tell the copper was installed between 1997 and 2000.

    Any advice would be welcome.
    No problems just connect your new copper or pex to the existing copper piping and save yourself a packet of $$$$ as you will be dead before its used by date comes up.

    Tony

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    • #3
      Re: Copper and Galvanized Question

      10 year old copper pipes in Toronto is still considered a "newborn". My last house was built in '73 and the copper pipes have never given a problem to this day, and we use "M" copper in Residential up here. Incindentally do you know if you have "M" (thin walled) or "L" (thick walled) copper pipe?. Look at the pipe if it's red writing, which will say "M", well then its "M". "L" is in blue writing.
      There are many factors affecting the longevity of copper pipes. Mainly: water quality, recirculation or not, and of course installation (reamed or not, & soldering, etc).

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