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  • plumbing physics question?

    I have a plumbing physics question concerning overflow.

    In the examples below, If I put half the amount of water that the combined tubes could hold through the standpipe, would the water be distributed equally among all the pipes( Pic 1)? or would the water level in the 2 inch pipes be lower because volume and weight(Pic 2)?.
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  • #2
    Re: plumbing physics question?

    Water never went to school
    It will always level out

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    • #3
      Re: plumbing physics question?

      water will always seek it's own level.

      what would be even a better example would be if you had a slope at the base of your section. lets just say the bottom of the common line was 6'' lower at the left side than the right side.picture a waste line

      the water would still be standing level on all four risers.

      this is how a water level works.

      rick.
      phoebe it is

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      • #4
        can

        pic #2. capillary action. in a 2.0 m(6.6') pipe ca is .014 mm. in a 2 cm(.79") pipe ca is 1.4 mm. breid..................

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        • #5
          Re: plumbing physics question?

          Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
          water will always seek it's own level.

          rick.
          OK then why are the oceans different levels on the pacific and Atlantic oceans at the panama canal, (about 8 inch's)

          Or why is it that,

          sea level typically runs about 60 cm (2 ft) higher in Bermuda than in New York.

          Oh by the way I will agree with your statement,
          Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
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          "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
          attributed to Samuel Johnson
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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          • #6
            Re: plumbing physics question?

            Centrifugal force (Earth's rotation) and gravitational effects of the Moon (and with less affect the Sun) would be my guess.

            Local atmospheric conditions (T-Storm, hurricane, high or low pressure waves, etc.) can affect tide levels in a specific area.
            Last edited by Bob D.; 09-19-2010, 05:46 AM.
            ---------------
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            “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
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            • #7
              Re: plumbing physics question?

              Oceans are subject to tides, winds and currents. Quite a different environment.

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              • #8
                Re: plumbing physics question?

                It will level itself out. Always does. We used to make red neck levels with 1/2" clear hose, and red dyed water, for shooting floor drains and such back in the day, when we could't afford those nice laser levels.
                www.seminoleplumbing.com

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                • #9
                  Re: plumbing physics question?

                  i still have a water level. just for shits and grins. put a 2" pipe on one end and a 1/2" pipe on the other. get back to me. i've tried it with 1/2" on one and 3/4" on the other, they were NOT level. look up capillary action. read up on it. try http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capillary_action. good reading for the flat earth people. lol. breid.....................

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                  • #10
                    Re: plumbing physics question?

                    Originally posted by BHD View Post
                    OK then why are the oceans different levels on the pacific and Atlantic oceans at the panama canal, (about 8 inch's)

                    Or why is it that,

                    sea level typically runs about 60 cm (2 ft) higher in Bermuda than in New York.

                    Oh by the way I will agree with your statement,
                    If you stretch your pipe from New York to Bermuda you will observe the same differences except the factors excluded by the pipe that exist between those 2 locations in open atmosphere and current conditions.
                    411 Plumb Appliance Stimulus Package

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                    • #11
                      red

                      will the pipe be straight or curved? makes a difference you know. breid................

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: plumbing physics question?

                        Is sea level of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans the same?
                        Sea level is about 20 cm higher on the Pacific side than the Atlantic due to the water being less dense on average on the Pacific side and due to the prevailing weather and ocean conditions. Such sea level differences are common across many short sections of land dividing ocean basins. http://www.psmsl.org/train_and_info/faqs/
                        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                        Why is the sea level higher off the coast of Bermuda than New York?

                        Any current which flows for longer than a day is, effectively, turning in circles as the Earth rotates. In the same way that an object moving in circles requires a force at right angles to its motion, like the Moon orbiting the Earth, any mean current in the ocean also requires a force (to the left, in the northern hemisphere) to balance its steady motion. This balance, between motion and a pressure force to the left, is known as geostrophy. It is also the reason why winds tend to blow along isobars, rather than directly from regions of high to low pressure, as you see every day on the weather.

                        The strong northward current, the Gulf Stream, which flows between Bermuda and New York results in sea level at Bermuda being about 1 metre higher than say Charleston (that is to say 'higher' with respect to a surface called the 'geoid', see 1. above).
                        http://www.psmsl.org/train_and_info/faqs/
                        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                        Just as a jet stream in the atmosphere separates zones of higher and lower air pressure, the fast-moving Gulf Stream separates areas of differing MSL as it runs up the Atlantic coast. The average mean sea level to the east of the Gulf Stream is considerably higher than it is between the current and the shoreline. For example, sea level typically runs about 60 cm (2 ft) higher in Bermuda than in New York. ... If the Gulf Stream were to weaken, the difference in sea level on its east and west sides would slacken, thus bringing higher sea levels to the U.S. and Canadian coasts. http://www2.ucar.edu/magazine/features/rough-seas
                        How many miles is it from New York City to Bermuda?
                        NY, NY to Bermuda, Bermuda is 769 miles (1238 km) (669 nautical miles)
                        Initial heading from New York to Bermuda
                        southeast (135.2 degrees)
                        http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_many_m...ity_to_Bermuda
                        now in my opinion even 2 feet in 770 miles is still fairly level, I am sure I could not read the bubble that accuracy on my masons level,
                        Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                        "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                        attributed to Samuel Johnson
                        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                        PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: plumbing physics question?

                          As the other have said it will be level - but this is based on the assumption that the pressure on the water from above (atmospheric pressure) is the same which is a good assumption in a building plumbing system. However, if you ran a water level for a long distance - say hundreds of miles - there is likely to be a pressure differential and the level will not be exactly the same. You can of course calculate the difference in height.

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                          • #14
                            Re: plumbing physics question?

                            i love it. put a clear straw in a glass of water. you will notice that the water is about a 1/8" above the water in glass. that is caused by capillary action. this may not work in beer, particularly if you are drinking the beer. if water always seeks it own level, why is the water higher in the straw? the phantom done it. maybe the water fairy is at work here. breid................

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                            • #15
                              Re: red

                              Originally posted by breid1903 View Post
                              will the pipe be straight or curved? makes a difference you know. breid................
                              Yea, how tall is your stepladder?

                              Have you got enough sky hooks?
                              411 Plumb Appliance Stimulus Package

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