Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Tap into an existing gas line for an extra furnace

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Re: Tap into an existing gas line for an extra furnace

    Originally posted by toolaholic View Post
    6 Years ? My drain is blocked again! HUGE ROOTS ! Nothing lasts 6 years anymore !
    How many blocked sewerage pipes cost over $750.00 to clear and if they have to be dug up and replaced you have to notify the plumbing authority that they have been repaired or replaced and the 6 year guarantee comes into place.

    Tony

    Comment


    • #32
      Re: Tap into an existing gas line for an extra furnace

      Originally posted by AFM View Post
      How many blocked sewerage pipes cost over $750.00 to clear and if they have to be dug up and replaced you have to notify the plumbing authority that they have been repaired or replaced and the 6 year guarantee comes into place.

      Tony
      $750.00 to clear main drain! You must be kidding shirley !
      I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

      Comment


      • #33
        Re: Tap into an existing gas line for an extra furnace

        Originally posted by toolaholic View Post
        $750.00 to clear main drain! You must be kidding shirley !

        So what is your average price to clear a seweage pipe on a domestic property from the house to the street.

        Tony

        Comment


        • #34
          Re: Tap into an existing gas line for an extra furnace

          Originally posted by NHMaster3015 View Post
          ... Just because a gas appliance will operate does not necessarily mean that it has the proper amount of gas delivered to the gas valve. When capacity is exceeded by either insuficient line size or lines that are too long the appliance will operate but not at its mazimum rated firing rate. The only way to know for sure is to know what your pressures are and the length and size of the piping.
          To compensate for friction loss of long lines, or more appliances, can the gas company turn up the pressure at the meter pressuregulator?
          Would that require installing regulators on appliances where that higher pressure would exceed their input limits?
          An indoor gas barbeque I saw has what appears to be another pressuregulator.

          Thank you.
          I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
          It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
          "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

          Comment


          • #35
            Re: Tap into an existing gas line for an extra furnace

            Is there a standard for gas pressure entering the house? I've researched it online and I've read anything from 1/2 to 2 to 5 psi. I chose to go the gas route because I figured I had large capacity in gas over electric. My garage has a phase converter to power a mill, lathe, surface grinder, disk sander and welder. I only have 200A of service coming into the house, hence the reason why I went the gas route for heat. Unfortunately, every appliance in the house is gas, done in an effort to conserve electricity for the machines.

            Should I turn on all of my appliances and see what the pressure is before I go buy this furnace for the garage?

            Comment


            • #36
              Re: Tap into an existing gas line for an extra furnace

              Originally posted by AFM View Post
              So what is your average price to clear a seweage pipe on a domestic property from the house to the street.

              Tony
              $49.99 Any blockage! And the RED LIGHT GUARANTEE

              When You don't see My van's red tail lights ,It's over Baby
              I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

              Comment


              • #37
                Re: Tap into an existing gas line for an extra furnace

                Originally posted by supahonkey View Post
                Is there a standard for gas pressure entering the house? I've researched it online and I've read anything from 1/2 to 2 to 5 psi. I chose to go the gas route because I figured I had large capacity in gas over electric. My garage has a phase converter to power a mill, lathe, surface grinder, disk sander and welder. I only have 200A of service coming into the house, hence the reason why I went the gas route for heat. Unfortunately, every appliance in the house is gas, done in an effort to conserve electricity for the machines.

                Should I turn on all of my appliances and see what the pressure is before I go buy this furnace for the garage?
                No, there really isn't. Your gas utility Co. Will know what street pressure is though, but there will be a regulator at the gas meter that steps it down to 3.5 - 7 in/wc. You need a pretty expensive and accurate gauge to get pressure readings at the appliance gas valves.
                sigpic

                Comment


                • #38
                  Re: Tap into an existing gas line for an extra furnace

                  Gas is nice ,But around 1974 i lived on Cape Cod Mass.Cooold winters and new garage workshop ! Sears had a new oil fired hot air furnace with a dented sheet metal side $125.00. I think it was 125,000 Btus. I set up a gravity feed 55 gal.fuel tank outside the garage. It was toasty ! Do a search for " sears scratch and dent store
                  in Your area. Sometimes I can't find a scratch on an appliance.
                  KILLER PRICES !
                  I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Re: Tap into an existing gas line for an extra furnace

                    Just came across this thread. SH, as a mechanical engineer, I'm surprised you didn't do a proper gas demand calculation on your system. It's not hard to do. First, measure the developed length of the line to be tapped from the meter to the farthest appliance and record that figure. Then, add the btus of all the appliances served by the line your plan to tap into (including the new appliance you plan to add), divide the total by 1000 (the divisor may be 1100, depending on the btu value of a cu. ft. of gas supplied by your gas company). The dividend of this equation will be the maximum total gas demand placed upon the pipe serving you plan to tie into. Now, find the appropriate gas table (if there are multiple tables, look for the one for pressure less than one pound) in your Indiana gas fuel code book. Scroll down the table to the column with the nearest length greater than your overall measurement. Now, scroll across to the nearest number greater than your cu. ft. load. Finally, scroll up this row to the top where the appropriate size pipe will be indicated. If it's one inch or smaller, all's well. If not, you'll have to increase the size of the line back to the meter, or run a separate line from the meter to your new appliance.
                    That's the proper way to size the line and as an engineer, I know you want to do a proper job. Or, as Adam suggested, you could always hire a licensed professional.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Re: Tap into an existing gas line for an extra furnace

                      plumb. i kinda wondered about that. mechanical engineer huh. well i'm a brain surgeon, i got arrested in the 60's a few times for trying it. breid........

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X