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  • PRV and sprinklers

    Hello all

    Wife and I are renting a home here in Denver. Water pressure at the faucets and showers is terrible. Called the water company and they assured at least 100psi into the house. Bought a Rain Bird exterior psi gauge and at the cold water faucet of the washer and two outside hose bibs, we're getting 38psi.

    Yuck.

    In the basement is of course the pressure relief valve. I know I can adjust it to increase the whole house pressure, but my rental also has a sprinkler system (drained and off obviously right now).

    The main water pipe comes in through the basement concrete, then the PRV, then the water meter, then the split off for the sprinkler system.

    (I assume this is wrong in that the PRV ought to be after the split for the sprinkler, but I can't change the pipes as it isn't my place.)

    Since I'm assuming the sprinkler was installed with the GPM and PSI measured with the crappy 38psi (or perhaps the original 50PSI or so was then dialed back instead), I'm then assuming the heads were chosen based on the low pressure. Or can ALL sprinkler heads deal with 50psi?

    Thus, my question....

    If I increase the rest of the house pressure (to say, 50psi) so it's good for the nine months of the year when we don't use the system, will I risk destroying the heads with too much pressure when the system is opened up in the summer?

    Or can the heads 'take it' and then simply be dialed back distance wise since I'm assuming (again with the assumptions!) that if I increase the entire home's pressure, the water will shoot too far out of the heads.

    But mostly I'm concerned with wrecking the heads or other parts of the sprinkler system (or anything else for that matter) with feeding too much pressure.

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Re: PRV and sprinklers

    Fire sprinklers or lawn sprinklers???

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: PRV and sprinklers

      P.R.V. stands for pressure reducing valve....and as far as I know you will be safe turning up the water pressure...here sprinkler companys run high pressures to heads without any problems.
      Poor Planning On Your Part Does Not Constitute An Emergency On My Part!!
      You can fire me...but you can't tell me what to do!

      Derek

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: PRV and sprinklers

        Originally posted by bml View Post
        Fire sprinklers or lawn sprinklers???
        Sorry. Rain Bird lawn sprinklers

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: PRV and sprinklers

          it's not uncommon to see 100-150# at the outside irrigation sprinklers. of course too much pressure is bad, noisy and automatic sprinkler valves are typically rated for 150 and less. the water hammer will easily spike it double.

          code is 80# and less within the structure.

          rick.
          phoebe it is

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: PRV and sprinklers

            Tracked this down in relation to your other thread. 50 psi shouldn't do much of anything to the sprinklers. There are solenoid valves associated with the sprinklers that can give water hammer when closing.

            Sometimes that comes up as a problem that has to be addressed but most of the time I don't see it that much. Being the tie in is after the PRV an expansion tank can also absorb this hammer.

            Heads are rated differently. You can find information in relation to PSI for RainBird heads here by poking around some.

            http://www.rainbird.com/

            Remember though, it's not your house.

            Good luck.


            J.C.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: PRV and sprinklers

              Originally posted by JCsPlumbing View Post
              Tracked this down in relation to your other thread. 50 psi shouldn't do much of anything to the sprinklers. There are solenoid valves associated with the sprinklers that can give water hammer when closing.

              Sometimes that comes up as a problem that has to be addressed but most of the time I don't see it that much. Being the tie in is after the PRV an expansion tank can also absorb this hammer.

              Heads are rated differently. You can find information in relation to PSI for RainBird heads here by poking around some.

              http://www.rainbird.com/

              Remember though, it's not your house.

              Good luck.


              J.C.
              Thanks for the info. I figured from the previous answers of the thread that the additional pressure from 38 to 50 wouldn't cause I problem.

              So I set out to increase the pressure at the PRV but while having the gauge attached to the washer pipe, and after the crank down of the PRV, the pressure jumped quicker than I thought.

              So I cranked it back and ran water to relieve the pressure to get it to stabilize.

              But when it was sitting it very slowly started moving up the additional 10 pounds from the 'first turn on' reading.

              That's why I created a new thread since I'm no longer worried about wrecking the sprinkler heads.

              So, should I look at the very first turn on? Or turn it on and check it 10+ minutes later?

              I'm just trying to get an accurate reading so I don't overdo the PRV crank down.

              Thanks

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: PRV and sprinklers

                Originally posted by steve0617 View Post
                Thanks for the info. I figured from the previous answers of the thread that the additional pressure from 38 to 50 wouldn't cause I problem.

                So I set out to increase the pressure at the PRV but while having the gauge attached to the washer pipe, and after the crank down of the PRV, the pressure jumped quicker than I thought.

                So I cranked it back and ran water to relieve the pressure to get it to stabilize.

                But when it was sitting it very slowly started moving up the additional 10 pounds from the 'first turn on' reading.

                That's why I created a new thread since I'm no longer worried about wrecking the sprinkler heads.

                So, should I look at the very first turn on? Or turn it on and check it 10+ minutes later?

                I'm just trying to get an accurate reading so I don't overdo the PRV crank down.

                Thanks
                Your highest static reading that will be in the house should be around 10 p.m. after the firing cycle of the water heater.

                Keep at 60 psi static pressure or below.

                What can be frustrating at times is that pressure and volume are two different things.

                Example:

                So you could have 100 psi coming through a 3/8" line feeding many things and be very dissatisfied.

                On the other hand, you could have 40 psi coming through a 1-1/2" line feeding the same things and be very satisfied.

                Layout and many things can factor. Quick answer for me is keep it below 60 psi after the water heater firing cycle at 10 p.m. to be safe.


                J.C.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: PRV and sprinklers

                  Originally posted by JCsPlumbing View Post
                  Your highest static reading that will be in the house should be around 10 p.m. after the firing cycle of the water heater.

                  Keep at 60 psi static pressure or below.

                  What can be frustrating at times is that pressure and volume are two different things.

                  Example:

                  So you could have 100 psi coming through a 3/8" line feeding many things and be very dissatisfied.

                  On the other hand, you could have 40 psi coming through a 1-1/2" line feeding the same things and be very satisfied.

                  Layout and many things can factor. Quick answer for me is keep it below 60 psi after the water heater firing cycle at 10 p.m. to be safe.


                  J.C.
                  OK so when the water heater is doing it's thing, don't read it then because of course the pressure will be higher since there is no relief tank. So only check the static pressure when obviously no water is running and when the water heater is not firing.

                  Do I have that right?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: PRV and sprinklers

                    Originally posted by steve0617 View Post
                    OK so when the water heater is doing it's thing, since I don't have the pressure tank, that's when I should make sure the pressure remains below 60psi, right?

                    All the other times when the water heater isn't running, I should then ignore?
                    They should be lower at those other times. So you're setting it at the highest it will rise when you are not there babysitting the gauge. You are setting the pressure by the device (water heater) that can increase the psi automatically when noone is thinking about it.

                    Make sense?


                    J.C.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: PRV and sprinklers

                      Originally posted by JCsPlumbing View Post
                      They should be lower at those other times. So you're setting it at the highest it will rise when you are not babysitting the gauge.

                      Make sense?


                      J.C.
                      I wrote that first but then deleted it but you got it before I did it wrong.

                      So, check the pressure when the water heater *is* running (thus accounting for the expansion) and not babysit the gauge when the heater is off.

                      Right?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: PRV and sprinklers

                        Originally posted by steve0617 View Post
                        I wrote that first but then deleted it but you got it before I did it wrong.

                        So, check the pressure when the water heater *is* running (thus accounting for the expansion) and not babysit the gauge when the heater is off.

                        Right?
                        Correct.

                        Water heater runs to set temperature.

                        All fixtures off.

                        Check pressure.

                        Set pressure at PRV.

                        And you might be surprised how high it goes and you are still not satisfied with performance. PSI is not Volume.

                        I'm done.

                        Good luck.


                        J.C.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: PRV and sprinklers

                          Originally posted by JCsPlumbing View Post
                          Correct.

                          Water heater runs to set temperature.

                          All fixtures off.

                          Check pressure.

                          Set pressure at PRV.

                          And you might be surprised how high it goes and you are still not satisfied with performance. PSI is not Volume.

                          I'm done.

                          Good luck.


                          J.C.
                          That's exactly what I needed.

                          You're right. I was quite surprised as how much the gauge jumped when the heater turned on. Wonder why Denver CO codes don't require a water heater pressure relief tank.

                          Thanks a ton for your help.

                          Comment

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