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  • Pipes in walls

    Hi,

    I'm hoping someone here will kindly help me!

    My wife and I are buying a new house - already built -- in Wisconsin. We've asked the seller to install washer/dryer hookups upstairs in the kitchen area. They agreed to this, but now we're having a little issue of how exactly to do it.

    The location we want the hookups is on an outside wall -- actually the unheated garage is outside. They want to know what kind of insulation they should use. The water supply pipe will likely be pex -- that's what's in the rest of the house.

    I know this can be done. The nearly-new house we're renting now has w/d hookups in an exterior wall.

    If anybody could give us some guidance, we'd be very appreciative.

    Thank you!

    Reid

  • #2
    Re: Pipes in walls

    Originally posted by rmagney View Post
    Hi,

    I'm hoping someone here will kindly help me!

    My wife and I are buying a new house - already built -- in Wisconsin. We've asked the seller to install washer/dryer hookups upstairs in the kitchen area. They agreed to this, but now we're having a little issue of how exactly to do it.

    The location we want the hookups is on an outside wall -- actually the unheated garage is outside. They want to know what kind of insulation they should use. The water supply pipe will likely be pex -- that's what's in the rest of the house.

    I know this can be done. The nearly-new house we're renting now has w/d hookups in an exterior wall.

    If anybody could give us some guidance, we'd be very appreciative.

    Thank you!

    Reid
    Reid: If you live in Wisconsin you should know that putting plumbing on an outside wall is not the best idea.

    However, if you must have plumbing in an outside wall. I would try and create a 2nd wall on the inside of the original wall and keep your plumbing in the interior wall. With proper insulation in the outside wall you'll likely never have a problem. If you can't spare the four inches a 2nd wall would take then what about 2"? If no extra wall space is possible: Place water and drain piping in the cabinet! Only pipe the waste and vent on the outside wall as a last resort. If it's a "must" run the pipe as close as possible to the inside wall surface. For water piping I would use Uponor PEX. For waste I would use either solid PVC or no hub cast in the trap for the standpipe.

    Spray foam between the pipe and the outside wall surface. Use closed cell foam to cut down on air infiltration.

    Then place a return air grill over the trap area near the floor, and another one higher so you get some warm air circulation on the pipes themselves. I've had inspectors OK a trap on an outside wall when the piping was semi exposed with a return air grill cover. And it doesn't look too hideous.

    Good Luck to you sir!!
    Time flies like an arrow.

    Fruit flies like a banana.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Pipes in walls

      Welcome to the board,

      If it was mine, I would have two copper lines ran up on the inside surface of the wall for the washer, I would not put any water pipes in the exterior wall it self, unless you like freeze ups, and I am not in as cold of a area that you are, but here we do not run plumbing in a exterior wall if it can be helped. (and I know people who have the back of cabinets tore out with the dry wall cut out to keep pipes from freezing,

      here when ever it drops in to sub zero temps we leave all the cupboard doors under sinks open to keep the pipes from freezing under the sinks in the cabinets,

      If you are totally set on having it in the wall, build up the wall insulate it, dry wall and have put a 2x2 furring on the wall, run the plumbing in the 2x2 and then dry wall over that, (I would cut and put in what looks like (furnace cold air returns) in the very bottom of the cavity and above the faucets that supply the washer, to keep room temperature air in the plumbing cavity.

      you have a small advantage of the garage on the other side, but I would not trust it to keep the cold out,
      Last edited by BHD; 03-09-2011, 06:26 PM.
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      • #4
        Re: Pipes in walls

        Double out the wall with another 2x4 wall.Insulate with a minimum of R-24 insulation . I would use celotex board and caulk/ seal the between the insulation and framing . You can cut out what you need behind the washer box and trap to keep everything in the wall and still be well protected
        ''Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" Benjamin Franklin

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        • #5
          Re: Pipes in walls

          I am sure you could go through a lot of extra work, and a little extra worry and put those lines in an exterior wall - but why would you want to.

          Framing an additional wall would work, I have done that on the east coast, but its extra work, and if space is at a premium may not be practical.

          I tend to side with BHD. Safest and easiest to run the water lines exposed behind the machine, in the conditioned space - where you probably never see them.

          As far as the waste piping goes - you can run the drain and vent in the wall, stub out and turn the trap parallel to the finished wall again exposed behind the machine and run your standpipe up.

          Out of sight - and piece of mind.

          Good Luck

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Pipes in walls

            Mount the washing machine box exposed on the existing wall. The washing machine will be there so you will not see the pipes anyway. No way for it to ever feeze. Build a simple cover for the pipes if you do not wish to see them when you look over the washing machine.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Pipes in walls

              Use seamless insulation around the pipes, and make sure your stud pockets and the space is properly insulated.

              For the pipe insulation, use the thicker wall seamless insulation, and you will never have a problem. Make sure all pipe insulation joints are taped so they don't come apart.

              I would not recommend using pipe insulation with seams at all.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Pipes in walls

                Can you run the pipes up inside the room behind the clothes washer?

                I would never run pipes in an exterior wall, especially in higher latitudes, unless two vents were installed to allow room air into the wall. Buthat wastes energy.

                For our clothes washer, which backs against a north exterior wall, I ran pipes in the wall to the side.
                I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
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