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4 inch lead elbow connection to a 4" cast iron stack has failed.

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  • #16
    Re: 4 inch lead elbow connection to a 4" cast iron stack has failed.

    Originally posted by geno gardner View Post
    Melting the old lead wiped joint can be messy and then we have to breathe the lead fumes. We're disturbing the caulked joint heat and I've found it's about the same time to just cut the old lead bend and caulked joint out with a sawzall. Plus, then the owner has the benefit of a new joint.

    There's more than one way to skin a cat. If someone is comfortable leaving a forty - eighty year old piece of brass with an unknown life expectancy installed then that's their business.

    So you try to scare me with the lead fumes and when that doesn't work its becomes about leaving 40-80 yr old brass.....But its ok to leave the 40-80 yr old cast....but not the brass. Ok I understand and thanks for the tips.

    Ultimately your right about differnet ways to do the job. That was the best part of your post.

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    • #17
      Re: 4 inch lead elbow connection to a 4" cast iron stack has failed.

      Originally posted by TheMaster View Post
      So you try to scare me with the lead fumes and when that doesn't work its becomes about leaving 40-80 yr old brass.....But its ok to leave the 40-80 yr old cast....but not the brass. Ok I understand and thanks for the tips.

      Ultimately your right about differnet ways to do the job. That was the best part of your post.

      TM: When I'm deciding what is the best solution to a plumbing problem I usually do a quick risk - reward assessment. I expect most trades people do the same without consciously thinking about it.

      Here in Mn, especially in the cities, 99% of the cast I see is is XH. The fittings seldom rot or fail. The pipe itself will, especially when it's sitting in water. Anyway, the risk of an XH san tee failing here is negligible so I'm not worried about the cast failing unless there are actual signs. I previously listed the reasons I normally remove the wiping ferrule. Just a couple weeks ago I posted a pic of a caulk joint that was failing at a closet bend San tee.

      When I leave my customers' I try to leave with my work providing trouble free service for as long as possible. Since leaving the ferrule doesn't really save that much time, and my experience indicates both the ferrules and the caulk joint can go bad I remove the ferrule.

      Most plumbers have been around the block and know what the risks are when using / leaving old connections so trying to "scare" plumbers would seem ludicrous? I was pointing out the reasons for what I do. If your normal practice is to connect to the ferrule then that's working for you and that's your call. When you do some piping repairs in houses you run your water piping outside the house. Impossible here. You run your water piping in the attic. Normally not possible here. Clearly plumbing experiences and conditions are different where you work than where I work.
      Time flies like an arrow.

      Fruit flies like a banana.

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      • #18
        Re: It's not easy...

        Originally posted by DUNBAR PLUMBING View Post
        Name:  9f09a80044a0727d37c04279945ba855.jpg
Views: 1
Size:  80.5 KB



        It's not easy driving that service weight gasket inside that hub. Takes some good plumbing skills to do so.

        Flip one side inside out then place the opposite side in the hub. Unflip the other side so it goes back to normal and it'll pop in place, no tools needed.
        Buy cheap, buy twice.

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