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  • #16
    Re: tee or wye?

    I just would like to see the reasoning for it. It can't be the bend because the bend is the same as a 90 or St 90. And i don't see why the flow coming out of the bend would be the issue because it seems to me that it would be the same as a combo or wye. But i guess the longer sweep might direct the flow down the line a little better
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    • #17
      Re: tee or wye?

      Originally posted by rynei View Post
      I just would like to see the reasoning for it. It can't be the bend because the bend is the same as a 90 or St 90. And i don't see why the flow coming out of the bend would be the issue because it seems to me that it would be the same as a combo or wye.
      Its not the same, in a 90 the flow has no choice, in a tee it has a choice and its not a smooth flow transition....look at it this way, if you sent a cable down the line which way in the tee is it going to go? I will bet there is a 50 50 chance of going one way or the other, water won't be any different...
      Poor Planning On Your Part Does Not Constitute An Emergency On My Part!!
      You can fire me...but you can't tell me what to do!

      Derek

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      • #18
        Re: tee or wye?

        Originally posted by rynei View Post
        I tee used on its back would direct the flow just like a wye with a 45 or a combo would. It would not let the flow go the wrong way unless it was a cleanout tee or it was backfalling. When it comes through the bend it would fall in the exact same fashion as it would if you were using a wye.
        Originally posted by rynei View Post
        Ok well that solves it, I don't agree with the code but i will take that into account from now on.
        Tee's on their back are no gouda.

        You have to have a "long sweep" pattern when going from vertical to horizontal.



        Wye's cannot be used to pick up fixture drains before the fixture vent. Example, a sink drain from the outlet of a trap needs to go to a Tee in the wall. This enables the vent to function properly and prevents trap siphonage.

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        • #19
          Re: tee or wye?

          Bottom line is, if your drain is going from horizontal to horizontal, you need a wye....vertical to horizontal, you need a wye....horizontal to vertical, a tee is acceptable (but you can certainly still use a wye). And if by chance it's going from vertical to vertical....well, then you probably need a pump!

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          • #20
            Re: tee or wye?

            Originally posted by Swade Plumbing View Post

            Wye's cannot be used to pick up fixture drains before the fixture vent. Example, a sink drain from the outlet of a trap needs to go to a Tee in the wall. This enables the vent to function properly and prevents trap siphonage.
            I feel the same way but in Florida they are allowing a combo instead of a San. tee for horizontal to vertical at the vent......I know I know but they are doin it there.....maybe other places i dunno

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            • #21
              Re: tee or wye?

              Originally posted by TheMaster View Post
              I feel the same way but in Florida they are allowing a combo instead of a San. tee for horizontal to vertical at the vent......I know I know but they are doin it there.....maybe other places i dunno
              Same here, a combo can be used but most guys here don't know what that is...
              Poor Planning On Your Part Does Not Constitute An Emergency On My Part!!
              You can fire me...but you can't tell me what to do!

              Derek

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              • #22
                Re: tee or wye?

                Originally posted by TheMaster View Post
                I feel the same way but in Florida they are allowing a combo instead of a San. tee for horizontal to vertical at the vent......I know I know but they are doin it there.....maybe other places i dunno
                Well that's kinda weird. The vent is probably not going to function properly with combo. I was told by the IL State inspector at the last continuing ed that the whole point of using a tee is to allow the air to move properly.

                Florida does some weird stuff. I've been told that they are pretty lax in some parts of the state with code.

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                • #23
                  Re: tee or wye?

                  If you use a wye for the vertical for a trap arm, when the trap is installed and if the pipe is properly pitched, it puts the trap weir above the wye inlet which theoretically can cause the trap to siphon. The IPC and UPC both allow a san tee to be installed horizontally provided the run of the san tee is vertical and DOES NOT recieve the discharge from any fixture. (in other words it must be a dry vent)
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                  • #24
                    Re: tee or wye?

                    The way I was taught was that a tee on its back will tend to cause an obstruction, over time. The water flowing down the branch of the tee ( the middle opening) will splash when it hits the back of the tee. Debris in the water will accumulate on the back and eventually cause a stoppage, at least that was the thinking when soil pipe was in use.

                    I have seen hundreds of old homes that have a tee on its back directly under the water closet and they still work, although they are 4" all the way.

                    Why fight it, tees are not allowed underground, laying flat, or on their back. If that is what is required, do it, it is proper plumbing.

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                    • #25
                      Re: tee or wye?

                      Funny thing, I just saw this same discussion a little while ago on a excavator forum and the guys doing site work do just the opposite they use santee's and not Y's and I mean on their backs. Why? Because when the site is backfilled a Y stands up to far and is often broken. This is on side sewers, rain leaders, storm drains. A Y is somteimes hard to find at Water Works depts.
                      Seattle Drain Service

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                      • #26
                        Re: tee or wye?

                        Originally posted by Cuda View Post
                        Funny thing, I just saw this same discussion a little while ago on a excavator forum and the guys doing site work do just the opposite they use santee's and not Y's and I mean on their backs. Why? Because when the site is backfilled a Y stands up to far and is often broken. This is on side sewers, rain leaders, storm drains. A Y is somteimes hard to find at Water Works depts.
                        Is this yard work? Plumbers do that here all the time for c/o in the yard because a tee is cheaper than a two-way c/o....BTW, same plumbers don't pull permits either...
                        Poor Planning On Your Part Does Not Constitute An Emergency On My Part!!
                        You can fire me...but you can't tell me what to do!

                        Derek

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Re: tee or wye?

                          Originally posted by TheMaster View Post
                          I feel the same way but in Florida they are allowing a combo instead of a San. tee for horizontal to vertical at the vent......I know I know but they are doin it there.....maybe other places i dunno
                          not sure where your at but i've been in fl for about 14 yrs now and have done plenty of new homes and never used a combo on a stack to pick up a trap. knowing how things are done down here i would find it hard to believe that a new construction plumber would spend the extra money on a combo. after all it's not how good we can do it but how cheap.

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                          • #28
                            Re: tee or wye?

                            Most licensed plumbers know (or should know) that you can't install a santee on it's back, PERIOD. There shouldn't be any discussion on this if it will work or not. More than half of the opening is a straight drop in, it's not sloped. IT'S NOT THE SAME!!! I realize this forum is for asking questions and a lot of folks here are not licensed plumbers so this isn't directed towards you. BUT... if you are a licensed plumber and have been doing this then you should have your license pulled and go back to apprentice school. WOW!!!

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                            • #29
                              Re: tee or wye?

                              Originally posted by ironranger View Post
                              Most licensed plumbers know (or should know) that you can't install a santee on it's back, PERIOD. There shouldn't be any discussion on this if it will work or not. More than half of the opening is a straight drop in, it's not sloped. IT'S NOT THE SAME!!! I realize this forum is for asking questions and a lot of folks here are not licensed plumbers so this isn't directed towards you. BUT... if you are a licensed plumber and have been doing this then you should have your license pulled and go back to apprentice school. WOW!!!
                              Are you sure they cant be installed on their backs PERIOD? They are allowed on their backs for the vent system where i've worked.

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                              • #30
                                Re: tee or wye?

                                The IPC will allow a san tee on it's back provided that the run be vertical and that it not recieve the waste from fixtures. That means it can only be used for a dry vent.

                                A wye and 1/8 bend or a combo, installed vertical with the run horizontal and being used to drain a trapped fixture will put the trap weir above the fitting inlet and therefore will create a siphon.
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