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Can a one-way sewer valve be installed in existing house?

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  • #16
    Re: Can a one-way sewer valve be installed in existing house?

    Originally posted by ToUtahNow View Post
    They have giant sediment basins and tanks but the storage is limited. When the system is over-burdened, they have outfall pipes that dump it into the river. The EPA is finally starting to fine municipalities for overflows.

    About 90% of the almost 800 combined sewer systems are east of the Missouri River. Then there are two in California and maybe another 40 between Oregon and Washington. Colorado does not have any CSO.
    Mark
    How horrible - unless they are able to contain the water for treatment. But would not such dilution ruin digestion?

    Why would anyone havever done this?
    Why not allow rain water to run into gutters and creeks?
    (Two of our front downspouts run into a pipe which opens under our front lawn away from the house.
    Would like to know how they did that?)
    I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
    It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
    "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

    Comment


    • #17
      Re: Can a one-way sewer valve be installed in existing house?

      Originally posted by Robert Gift View Post
      How horrible - unless they are able to contain the water for treatment. But would not such dilution ruin digestion?

      Why would anyone havever done this?
      Why not allow rain water to run into gutters and creeks?
      (Two of our front downspouts run into a pipe which opens under our front lawn away from the house.
      Would like to know how they did that?)
      Keep in mind Chicago's combined sewer system is 150-years old. This is how much of the stuff out east was handled prior to modern sanitation. Combined Sewer systems are now illegal to install and many areas are working on separation programs.

      Mark
      "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

      I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

      Comment


      • #18
        Re: Can a one-way sewer valve be installed in existing house?

        Originally posted by ToUtahNow View Post
        Keep in mind Chicago's combined sewer system is 150-years old. This is how much of the stuff out east was handled prior to modern sanitation. Combined Sewer systems are now illegal to install and many areas are working on separation programs.

        Mark
        Well put Mark.

        Chicago is also home to the world's largest sewage treatment plant in Stickney, IL (about 10 minutes from my home). Not surprising considering the size of the city and combined sewer systems.

        Many combined sewers are as "young" as 60-70 years old.

        It will cost billions of dollars to separate storm and sanitary in chicago.

        With so many small suburbs there is little chance of achieving a unified effort to attempt such a project.

        Only a few individual towns/cities have undergone such a project. Most could not even dream of how to come up with the money.

        Until then there is a huge market for "Flood Control" systems, overhead sewer conversions, lift stations, "modified overhead sewers", etc.

        Many villages even offer subsidies for such work to prevent basement flooding.

        Here is an example of one such town that I work in frequently:

        http://www.river-forest.us/pdf/pw/ba...revBooklet.pdf

        I prefer to do overhead sewer conversions, "modified conversions" (where the basement drains are re-routed to an ejector basin, but no new sewer is brought in above the basement floor)
        or install a lift station if overhead systems are impractical.

        Here is an example of a pre-engineered lift station that I install often. This one has seepage collection built into the galvanized steel basin and uses an industrial grade vertical pump.

        http://tramcopump.com/assets/FlashPa...60brochure.swf



        You can also engineer a lift station using a standard fiberglass ejector basin and submersible ejector pump.

        Comment


        • #19
          Re: Can a one-way sewer valve be installed in existing house?

          Like Chicago, because the old City of Toronto has combined sewer, when it rains hard and the sewage treatment plants are overburdened, the sewage flows directly into Lake Ontario untreated.

          Comment


          • #20
            Re: Can a one-way sewer valve be installed in existing house?

            So, if I get close to a street storm drain, will I smell raw sewage?
            Or is there some kind of trap? With common outdoor debris, that could be a clog problem.

            Amazing.
            I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
            It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
            "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

            Comment


            • #21
              Re: Can a one-way sewer valve be installed in existing house?

              Originally posted by Robert Gift View Post
              So, if I get close to a street storm drain, will I smell raw sewage?
              Or is there some kind of trap? With common outdoor debris, that could be a clog problem.

              Amazing.
              The drawings in this link will give you a better understanding.

              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:CS...ram_US_EPA.jpg

              The sewer smell would be no different than a regular manhole smell.

              Mark
              "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

              I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

              Comment


              • #22
                Re: Can a one-way sewer valve be installed in existing house?

                Originally posted by ToUtahNow View Post
                ...The sewer smell would be no different than a regular manhole smell.
                Mark
                "POTW"? Like we are supposed to knowhathat means?

                Excepthat most manhole covers have two very small openings whereas the storm drain has large openings.

                (I like the biological smell of raw sewage!)
                I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
                It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
                "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: Can a one-way sewer valve be installed in existing house?

                  Originally posted by Robert Gift View Post
                  "POTW"? Like we are supposed to knowhathat means?

                  Excepthat most manhole covers have two very small openings whereas the storm drain has large openings.

                  (I like the biological smell of raw sewage!)
                  Sorry it stands for "Publicly Owned Theatment Works".

                  Mark
                  "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                  I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Re: Can a one-way sewer valve be installed in existing house?

                    From the CWA:

                    Publicly owned treatment works ("POTW") means any device or system used in the treatment (including recycling and reclamation) of municipal sewage or industrial wastes of a liquid nature which is owned by a "State" or "municipality." This definition includes sewers, pipes, or otherconveyances only if they convey wastewater to a POTW providing treatment.
                    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                    Comment

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