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  • Can a one-way sewer valve be installed in existing house?

    Or, if a back-up is anticipated due to heavy rains, can one plug their basement drain with a test plug? (Like what I used to fill my PVC system with water to the top of the roof vento pass inspection.)

    I do not know it they have a basement bathroom.

    Thank you.
    Last edited by Robert Gift; 04-17-2011, 04:45 AM.
    I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
    It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
    "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

  • #2
    Re: Can a one-way sewer valve be installed in existing house?

    Originally posted by Robert Gift View Post
    Or, if a back-up is anticipated due to heavy rains, can one plug their basement drain with a test plug? (Like what I used to fill my PVC system with water to the top of the roof vento pass inspection.)

    I do not know it they have a basement bathroom.

    Thank you.
    Yes you can do either...is the city getting overloaded in the rains and then backing up momentary in your basement? Lots of basements here with bathrooms....
    Poor Planning On Your Part Does Not Constitute An Emergency On My Part!!
    You can fire me...but you can't tell me what to do!

    Derek

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    • #3
      Re: Can a one-way sewer valve be installed in existing house?

      Originally posted by dcman View Post
      Yes you can do either...is the city getting overloaded in the rains and then backing up momentary in your basement? Lots of basements here with bathrooms....
      A fellow volunteer firefighter acquaintence in Pennsylvania. Sounds like he has had this problem before after heavy rains.
      I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
      It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
      "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Can a one-way sewer valve be installed in existing house?

        Yes you can do that.

        My town got annihilated by 2 major storms last year 1 month apart. Many basements had 4-5' of standing water for about 12-14 hours.

        If you have an older home, the sewer will be subjected to some minor backpressure and if the sewer is clay tile ir even cast iron (sometimes) that can be devastating to the joints.

        There is a lot of discussion of the various forms of "flood control" on the forum in prior threads.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Can a one-way sewer valve be installed in existing house?

          You need one of these installed.

          http://www.backwater-valves.com/

          Full port, normally open backwater valve.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Can a one-way sewer valve be installed in existing house?

            Originally posted by whallupaz View Post
            You need one of these installed.
            http://www.backwater-valves.com/
            Full port, normally open backwater valve.
            Would be nice if they could make it a combination valve and basement drain and cleanout.
            I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
            It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
            "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Can a one-way sewer valve be installed in existing house?

              Oh it can be done, will most likely be putting it in the bsaement though, unless you want to dig it up in the yard. Which would most likely put it in the 8 foot range, if not 15ish...

              Could see it going in the floor of the basement pretty easily. Unless there is some code against this that I am not aware of. Anyone know?

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Can a one-way sewer valve be installed in existing house?

                If protecting the basement is the main goal then a B/W valve in the floor is great and somewhat easy. But if there are other drains left unprotected that are downstream of where the valve is placed they will not be protected. For instance if there is a daylight basement door access with stairs that has a drain and it is downstream of the new valve then sewage or rains would come up on the stairs and possibly flood the basement anyways. Then an outside valve offers better protection, but another problem could arise say there are downspouts tied into the line and you use an outside B/W valve and it inacts because of sewer back up the rain pouring into the downspouts will now come up in your basement. So one must be careful when installing a b/w valve, a sewer camera may be your best friend in this instance.
                Seattle Drain Service

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Can a one-way sewer valve be installed in existing house?

                  Originally posted by Cuda View Post
                  ... but another problem could arise say there are downspouts tied into the line and you use an outside B/W valve and it inacts because of sewer back up the rain pouring into the downspouts will now come up in your basement. ....
                  I assumed only one basement drain and placing it downstream of that. Or inflating a plug in the drain so nothing can come out of it.

                  I did not know anyone drained downspouts into the city sewer system.
                  Would heavy rains not overload the sewage treatment plant and ruin digestion by over-diluting the liquor?
                  I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
                  It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
                  "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Can a one-way sewer valve be installed in existing house?

                    Originally posted by Robert Gift View Post
                    I assumed only one basement drain and placing it downstream of that. Or inflating a plug in the drain so nothing can come out of it.

                    I did not know anyone drained downspouts into the city sewer system.
                    Would heavy rains not overload the sewage treatment plant and ruin digestion by over-diluting the liquor?
                    They only do this in areas where the storm water and waste are combined. I don't believe you are in one of those areas.

                    I would consider an adapt-a-valve with a test gate. You would have to do it manually but it would protect you. They are manufactured in the IPEX factory to really high standards. The only reason you don't see more of them is due to poor marketing.

                    Mark
                    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Can a one-way sewer valve be installed in existing house?

                      Originally posted by ToUtahNow View Post
                      They only do this in areas where the storm water and waste are combined. I don't believe you are in one of those areas.
                      I would consider an adapt-a-valve with a test gate. You would have to do it manually but it would protect you. They are manufactured in the IPEX factory to really high standards. The only reason you don't see more of them is due to poor marketing.

                      Mark
                      Denver is one place where they probably could get away withat.
                      But what a horrible idea to send rainwater into the sanitary sewer system.

                      If his clothes washer and utility sink are in the basement, as most in Pennsylvania,re, that could be a problem requiring a two more plugs.

                      The problem with manual operation is that one would probably be away when they needed to close it.
                      I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
                      It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
                      "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Can a one-way sewer valve be installed in existing house?

                        Originally posted by Robert Gift View Post
                        Denver is one place where they probably could get away withat.
                        But what a horrible idea to send rainwater into the sanitary sewer system.

                        If his clothes washer and utility sink are in the basement, as most in Pennsylvania,re, that could be a problem requiring a two more plugs.

                        The problem with manual operation is that one would probably be away when they needed to close it.
                        Your problems with a backwater valve is they are illegal for fixtures with flood rims above the upstream manhole. In addition, they can and do need maintenance to prevent stoppages. The test gate would be no different than the test plug you asked about.

                        Mark
                        "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                        I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Can a one-way sewer valve be installed in existing house?

                          Originally posted by Robert Gift View Post
                          I assumed only one basement drain and placing it downstream of that. Or inflating a plug in the drain so nothing can come out of it.

                          The plug would work if you were home .I would install a backwater valve with a cleanout down stream before exiting the house

                          I did not know anyone drained downspouts into the city sewer system.
                          Would heavy rains not overload the sewage treatment plant and ruin digestion by over-diluting the liquor?
                          I am sure they have ways of controlling the incoming water

                          Originally posted by ToUtahNow View Post
                          They only do this in areas where the storm water and waste are combined. I don't believe you are in one of those areas.

                          Sounds like he is

                          I would consider an adapt-a-valve with a test gate. You would have to do it manually but it would protect you. They are manufactured in the IPEX factory to really high standards. The only reason you don't see more of them is due to poor marketing.

                          And the fact that you have to "manually" operate it which again means you have to be there to do it ..Not sure I'm liking that idea althopugh I have never seen / installed one

                          Mark
                          ''Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" Benjamin Franklin

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Can a one-way sewer valve be installed in existing house?

                            Originally posted by OLD1 View Post
                            I am sure they have ways of controlling the incoming water
                            How? Where can they store and slowly release such a huge volume of water?
                            I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
                            It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
                            "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Can a one-way sewer valve be installed in existing house?

                              Originally posted by Robert Gift View Post
                              How? Where can they store and slowly release such a huge volume of water?
                              They have giant sediment basins and tanks but the storage is limited. When the system is over-burdened, they have outfall pipes that dump it into the river. The EPA is finally starting to fine municipalities for overflows.

                              About 90% of the almost 800 combined sewer systems are east of the Missouri River. Then there are two in California and maybe another 40 between Oregon and Washington. Colorado does not have any CSO.

                              Mark
                              "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                              I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                              Comment

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