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  • Plumber's Grease

    I just replaced the spout seals on my kitchen faucet to repair a leak from the base. Seems to be working so far.

    I applied some Plumber's Grease to the new seals before installing them. Now I understand I should be using silicon-based grease, and not petroleum-based grease. My little tube of Plumber's Faucet and Valve Grease does not indicate what the base is, but the instructions on the tube say it "allows easier installation of O-rings".

    Is there any way to tell from the consistency of the grease if I used the correct type? Too late to change now, but I would like to know for my peace of mind, and next time...

  • #2
    Re: Plumber's Grease

    Relax, We all use some version of plumbers grease. It's all for portable water.
    I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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    • #3
      Re: Plumber's Grease

      Originally posted by AverageHomeowner View Post
      I just replaced the spout seals on my kitchen faucet to repair a leak from the base. Seems to be working so far.

      I applied some Plumber's Grease to the new seals before installing them. Now I understand I should be using silicon-based grease, and not petroleum-based grease. My little tube of Plumber's Faucet and Valve Grease does not indicate what the base is, but the instructions on the tube say it "allows easier installation of O-rings".

      Is there any way to tell from the consistency of the grease if I used the correct type? Too late to change now, but I would like to know for my peace of mind, and next time...

      Smell the grease. If it has a petroleum base to it, or any type of yellow color to it, it's going to make those rings swell.


      The only grease that is non-reactive to rubber components inside of a faucet that comes in contact with potable water is silicone aka food grade type grease. A grease that is fda approved for potable water usage.


      Looks just like clear silicone, no smell whatsoever, spreads like jelly and allows for lubrication without danger of damaging the rubber components.
      Northern Kentucky Plumbers Twitter Feed | Plumbing Videos

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      • #4
        Re: Plumber's Grease

        That's what I was afraid of. This grease has a yellow color to it, as well as a stink.

        I just sent an email to the company to ask them. I'll report back with their response.

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        • #5
          Re: Plumber's Grease

          Originally posted by AverageHomeowner View Post
          That's what I was afraid of. This grease has a yellow color to it, as well as a stink.

          I just sent an email to the company to ask them. I'll report back with their response.

          If you bought it at Home Depot it was probably in a red/black/white squeeze tube made by harveys. It can be used without issue as long as it doesn't have anything to do with potable water.

          Like floor drain screws, the trim on a faucet valve, handle screws, the list goes on. Of course, nothing rubber.
          Northern Kentucky Plumbers Twitter Feed | Plumbing Videos

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          • #6
            Re: Plumber's Grease

            I sometimes use liquid wrench or wd40 type of penetrating sprays on shutoff valves to get them to free up when trying to close them to service a faucet or toilet. A friend said he doesn't like using them, fearing it will mess up the rubber parts. What do you think?

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            • #7
              Re: Plumber's Grease

              In my earlier post I said I would report back with the outcome, which is that I confirmed with the company that the grease I purchased and used is in fact petroleum-based. Anyone who works regularly with grease (not me) would probably have recognized this by its yellowish color and odor, even though the product packaging does not indicate petroleum or advise against using with potable connections. So I purchased some silicone-based grease, which is clear in color, no odor, and a bit more expensive. I replaced the seals again with the correct type of grease, only took me a few minutes and a couple inexpensive o-rings. Feel better now, especially since this seal is on our kitchen faucet spout. I wonder how many other DIYers have made the same mistake. Thanks to all who contributed to this post, especially Dunbar.

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              • #8
                Re: Plumber's Grease

                What a great service our members provide! THIS OLD DUMMY THOUGHT IT WAS ALL THE SAME! Thanks for the 1000th time Guys.
                I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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