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  • leaking newly installed toilet

    We are in the middle of a remodel of our home and our new toilet is leaking.

    This toilet was installed about a month & a half ago. About a week after it was installed we noticed water seeping out from under the toilet. (It was seeping along the seams & faux grout lines in our laminate flooring.) Our contractor came out to fix it. At this time he stated that the toilet hadn't completely sealed in one spot and this is where the leak was. He re-installed the toilet and said it was okay to use again.

    Well this weekend (right around the 1.5 month mark) the toilet started seeping again and we noticed water dripping from the sub-floor into our basement laundry room. I honestly don't know how long it had been leading because a rug covered the flooring and I don't go into the laundry room daily (or even weekly sometimes).

    I should probably add that the laminate floor is 1/2" thick (Alloc brand) and was installed over the existing ceramic tile.

    So my question is this: How should the toilet be installed?
    My suspicion based on internet research and talking to friends that that the toilet isn't "meeting" the flange correctly and it's leaking.
    Our contractor is suggesting that he mildewcide the flooring and use a taller wax ring. I've tried reading into that option and read people saying yes and no to this option. Is the "real" answer to have a new flange installed to meet the new flooring? Or is a taller wax ring actually going to fix the problem for good?

    I just want this done correctly once and for all. Not the easy way. Not the "should work" way. I know, third time's a charm. I am at my wits end with this guy and am just looking for professional input.

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Re: leaking newly installed toilet

    The flange should be the same level as the floor. Ideally. Also check to make sure there are no cracks in the flange and everything is okay.
    If the flange is to far down, you can stack wax rings and it will work, you just don't want to use too many. Because too many wax rings and you're gonna see problems. Also make sure that there is no stoppage of any kind. As it will cause your toilet to leak even when properly installed.

    And if you want it done right, do a little research and call a good plumber in your area. He will know what to look for and how to fix it.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: leaking newly installed toilet

      How difficult is it to cut out the low flange and install one to floor height? (Sitting on the floor, it's top about 1/2-inchigher than the floor.)

      Are there not wax rings with longer three-inch tubes?
      I would stack rings first.

      What about removing wax from the wax ring on a tube.
      Then silicone gluing the tube to the bottom of the toilet?
      Will take a little care in setting the toilet back on the flange. (May need to remove the tank to reduce weight.)
      Last edited by Robert Gift; 08-31-2011, 09:26 AM.
      I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
      It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
      "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: leaking newly installed toilet

        based on your original post, it sounds like the contractor is in need of a real plumber to either properly set the toilet or raise the flange.

        the dead giveaway was that the floor was set on top of the existing tile floor. the flange ideally is suppose to sit on top of the finished flooring.

        nothing wrong with a double wax ring, but you need to know right from wrong and how to properly stack and align them.

        rick.
        phoebe it is

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: leaking newly installed toilet

          You need to call a licensed professional plumber. Your "contractor" doesn't have a clue.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: leaking newly installed toilet

            I've worked on too many jobs where thousands of dollars in damages were caused by a poorly set water closet. It's one of those things that look so simply anyone can do it. The problem is many do it wrong and then it leaks. You're in the middle of a remodel so you need to correct it now by installing a proper flange at the proper height. If you have a camera, feel free to take some pictures with the water closet pulled then we can better critique your contractors work.

            Mark
            "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

            I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: leaking newly installed toilet

              They also make some plastic spacers that will bring the flange up to the right hight and
              then use one wax seal
              but like UTAH posted post some pictures so we can get a better ideal how to help !
              JERRYMAC
              E-MAILJERRYMAC777@GMAIL.COM
              CALIF. LIC. PLBG,HEAT,DRAINS,ELECTRIC,WATER HEATER, BOILER, POOL AND SPA HEATER
              FIRE SPRINKLER CONTRACTOR,
              SINCE JAN. 1989

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: leaking newly installed toilet

                Originally posted by TheMaster
                The above is bad info. The closet flange should be sittings on top of the finished floor.......NOT at the same level. What is the title of this forum? And for good reason.
                Are you still butthurt about having to do free callbacks on Toto toilets? Sorry you're that way.

                I prefer my flanges flush with the floor. Maybe a bit high, but flush for me seems to work best. I don't like my toilet sitting directly on my flange.

                As Rick said, "ideally" on top of the floor. I feel more comfortable with them flush. Since that space under the toilet where the wax sits, isn't very deep. And I hate when I get a rocking toilet from sitting on the nuts.

                If there is a code that says they are to sit/set on top of the floor, I apologize. Then yes, it would be bad info. Other than that it looks like one of the things that we can agree to disagree on.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: leaking newly installed toilet

                  I was going to agree with themaster at first, but in retrospect I'm going to agree with this post. I understand where you're coming from on the toilet hitting the nuts, but I personally have only had that issue if I'm using the thicker bolts and nuts, or i'm a little missaligned when I bolts the johnny bolts to the flange.

                  Originally posted by stolen View Post
                  Other than that it looks like one of the things that we can agree to disagree on.
                  No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: leaking newly installed toilet

                    Installing the closet flange on top of and secured to the finished floor has always

                    been the correct method. There is no way a water closet will teeter on a closet

                    flange that has been installed flush and level. There is no good reason for bolting

                    the closet bolts to the flange. If the floor is not level then shims should be used.

                    When you shim a w/c that is mounted to a floor level flange, leakage could result.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: leaking newly installed toilet

                      Originally posted by Big Jim View Post
                      Installing the closet flange on top of and secured to the finished floor has always

                      been the correct method. There is no way a water closet will teeter on a closet

                      flange that has been installed flush and level. There is no good reason for bolting

                      the closet bolts to the flange. If the floor is not level then shims should be used.

                      When you shim a w/c that is mounted to a floor level flange, leakage could result.

                      Bib Jim I can give you literally THOUSANDS of reasons to bolt them to the flange. It's my opinion that people who don't bolt them are cheap (no offense) but come on, we're talking a few more cents for two more nuts and washers. Thousands of times I've had to cut off old bolts because they spin and are loose, sometimes not even attached to the flange anymore because someone didn't want to take the extra minute to double nut.
                      I always bolt mine to the flange.
                      When I was younger and thought I was smarter I would cheat and try to re-use the old bolts only to pull the toilet again because they didn't work. Install a new wax and get pizzzed off only because I was lazy young and dumb. Not anymore, I always double bolt.

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                      • #12
                        Re: leaking newly installed toilet

                        I believe the flange needs to be sitting on top of the finished floor. Have never seen any goo come from the flange being installed any other way. If you cannot get the flange moved up then would silicone and bolt/screw a spacer flange onto existing flange till its at the proper hieght to use one wax ring. I believe if people are going to pay me as a professional then they should get a professional quality job not stacking wax rings like any handyman could do.
                        Last edited by Killing time; 08-31-2011, 10:10 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: leaking newly installed toilet

                          Maybe I haven't installed enough toilets in 38 yrs. of plumbing, but I've never

                          double nutted closet bolts and never had a reason to. Yes, I've pulled toilets

                          where the bolts were loose, but that was because the flange had cracked,

                          wasn't secured to the floor, or otherwise improperly set. I don't reuse old

                          bolts either, but that has nothing to do with anything. I have enough confidence

                          in my ability to properly set a flange and toilet that double nutting the bolts is

                          not necessary. That's just me, not disparaging your way of doing it.

                          I like Hercules johnny bolts, they don't spin.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: leaking newly installed toilet

                            I used to not double nut either. Until I pulled a toilet that made me wish the PREVIOUS plumber had.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: leaking newly installed toilet

                              PANCAKES ANYONE????

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