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Explain this wax ring failure

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  • Explain this wax ring failure

    I was reading the "leaking newly installed toilet" thread and with all of the talk of how pancakes are bad and you are stupid if you dont set your flange a certain way talk, it made me wonder about why a certain wax ring failed in a bathroom I did a remodel in a while back. Here is a picture of the failure. The toilet was leaking very slowly underneath the vinyl, causing black mold you can see in the outer edges of the picture. Floor is a concrete slab, flooring was 1 layer of vinyl glued to the slab.




    Discuss.
    We don't have preventative maintenance around here, we have CRISIS MANAGEMENT!

  • #2
    Re: Explain this wax ring failure

    Was the toilet leaking I don't see any caulking maybe the home owner had bad aim?

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    • #3
      Re: Explain this wax ring failure

      you can see the caulk ring, its edge is at the dirt. It was for certain leaking, the caulk was holding the moisture in, and it was escaping around the edge of the vinyl against the flange. The home owner is a woman, with no males in the house.
      We don't have preventative maintenance around here, we have CRISIS MANAGEMENT!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Explain this wax ring failure

        Is the floor level? Did you check for any rocking or other indication that it might be before you tightened the bolts?

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        • #5
          Re: Explain this wax ring failure

          i too would say rocking. from the photo the wax was fully compressed. but the rear 1/2 had the leak. if the floor and toilet don't sit flat to each other, then the toilet will pivot on the 2 bolts. typically you shim the rear to prevent rocking on an uneven floor or poor casting on the china. i use the hard plastic or soft rubber wedge shims.

          also a running toilet will contribute to a leak as the water is constantly flowing slightly enough for the water to cling onto the china horn and not drip into the center of the flange.

          clean the wax off and set the toilet on the flange. does it rock?

          rick.
          phoebe it is

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          • #6
            Re: Explain this wax ring failure

            Thta's why I " dry fit " each toilet before the final setting .Any wobble and out comes the pennies .Yep pennies I shim the bowl so there is no wobble and carefully lift the bowl set the wax ring right back down hoping not to disturb the pennies.Sometimes when a bad wobble comes up I might tro a nickle in there or a dime.Heck I have hammered a penny to get that perfect set.You can slam dance on the toilets I set.That's just the way I do it.I have seen people use galvanized washers and all kinds of bs ..Guess what galvanized washers rust.Wood shims rot.Plastic shims slide out ..But pennies are forever
            ''Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" Benjamin Franklin

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            • #7
              Re: Explain this wax ring failure

              Hard to tell from the picture but the flange might be slightly high causing all the wax to squeeze out..

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              • #8
                Re: Explain this wax ring failure

                Could be . Sometimes if it's a cast iron flange that's too high, you can tap it down and re peen the lead joint .Done that too
                ''Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" Benjamin Franklin

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                • #9
                  Re: Explain this wax ring failure

                  Originally posted by OLD1 View Post
                  You can slam dance on the toilets I set.
                  That's quite the mental picture LOL

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                  • #10
                    Re: Explain this wax ring failure

                    The toilet did not rock prior to removal, vinyl was scraped and replaced with tile, the old toilet did rock on the tile, but I used composite plastic shims to make it not rock. I have seen pennies used to shim toilets, and have done it a time or two, BUT have seen the copper make the caulking turn green, no thanks. I have no clue if the toilet had a continuous leak or not, it probably did at one point and time, and maybe still does? I did not hear the water running, or hear the toilet ever cycle after I had re-installed it.
                    We don't have preventative maintenance around here, we have CRISIS MANAGEMENT!

                    Comment

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