Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Storm water in basement issues Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Storm water in basement issues

    Great conversations people,
    We have been in the house over 25 yrs, house built in the early 70’s, and flooded 5 to 6 times, every time it’s been during heavy extended rain water from the weep, not sewage backup from the main. During regular storms I remove the weep tile cleanout cap in the basement and with a flash light view the water swirling at the bottom, this is good. During heavy rains, at one point it stops flowing and SLOWLY starts to back up. Stops draining to the main sewer, yes the weep drain is connected to the sewer outside the home. I do not know why it stops flowing? No one else in the neighborhood is experiencing this issue, as far as I know. After the rain stops and the given time to recedes, the water all drains with one big swoosh.
    Thinking the water table was just rising I installed a 4 ft. sump pit and sump pump in the corner of the basement, not connected to the weep. This didn’t do any good, water didn’t find its way to the sump during last big storm to be pumped out. Water stopped flowing and slowly started to back up. I gravity feed the sump with a garden hose, siphon, and the pump system and worked well to keep up with the rising ground water. I can easily relocate that sump to the weep cleanout to tap into the weep there. If I do that wouldn’t there be an issue with the gasses from the sewer entering the home? Please tell me there is a code to install an underground trap to keep that from happening. I think I will have to have it inspected with a camera to figure out why it stops flowing and to see if there is indeed a trap.
    Right sump pit, right pump, wrong place. Any ideas?

  • #2
    Re: Storm water in basement issues

    A camera is the best option to gain the information needed. Anything else is just guessing what it could be. A lot of drain tile that connects to a sewer system has a metering plate (solid cap with some 1/4" holes drilled in it) to regulate the water so that it does not all free flow to the sewer at peak times and is slowly allowed to enter the sewer after the rains have stopped. Could be clogged a little. There may be a Back Water valve installed also so be slow with the camera. And many other causes, get the line scoped to stop guessing and find the real cause. Please post back when you find the answer as it may help others in the future plus we like to know what happened.
    Seattle Drain Service

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Storm water in basement issues

      is this connected to the sanitary sewer and not a storm sewer (therefore odor/gases not an issue?) sounds odd from this part of the country as it would overwhelm the treatment plant every time it rained. We have CSO's here where a sanitary line will cross a storm line and when storm gets heavy enough it will pick up the sanitary (discharge to river/stream) so we designed treatment plant's to 'intercept' and treat before the point of discharge.

      This is interesting....

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Storm water in basement issues

        Originally posted by Dumfatnhappy View Post
        is this connected to the sanitary sewer and not a storm sewer (therefore odor/gases not an issue?) sounds odd from this part of the country as it would overwhelm the treatment plant every time it rained. We have CSO's here where a sanitary line will cross a storm line and when storm gets heavy enough it will pick up the sanitary (discharge to river/stream) so we designed treatment plant's to 'intercept' and treat before the point of discharge.

        This is interesting....
        It's funny how different areas can be so different. Here in Maine most homes on town sewer have an interior or perimeter drain that is tied into sanitary. And yes during heavy rains the treatment plants take a pounding. Heck we even still have plenty of town catch Basins tied into sewer.

        I have worked on a few CSO projects and I'm seeing more and more happening but we still have a LONG way to go here.

        MKRUSHLIN:
        The 2 problems I see with perm drains are root infestation and slit build up. More often then not, it's roots.
        When I show up, it's because the sewer has backed up. I snake out 4' and down goes the sewer clog. Start asking questions etc with the HO and soon find that their basement has been weeping for years.

        Camera the line and sure enough, the perm drain is so infested with roots that they have grown into the sewer line. The real problem with that is perm drains have no clean outs, so without using an excavator we have no way to snake or jet to remove the roots.
        INSIGHT PIPE is now Maine Drain Serving most of ME with no charge for travel! 207-431-6232 is nolonger a working # our NEW # is 207-355-1476
        Sewer main snaking (roto rooting). Sink clogs. Sewer backup. Pipe inspection/locating. No Dig trenchless repair. Root clog removal.We are NOT to replace your local Plumber, as we do not do plumbing. WE ARE YOUR DRAIN CLEANING EXPERTS!!! www.sewermaine.com waterville winslow bangor augusta skowhegan fairfield pittsfield oakland

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Storm water in basement issues

          From reading your post I suspect your storm system has a mineral build up that restricts the flow at peak times. That is not uncommon in where you live. The system is just not able to flow at the rate it was designed for. There are other things that could cause this, roots in the line, the tap could of shifted etc. you should check your outside grading to make sure everything drains away from your house. If you need to camera your line PM me I am in 48150. Right next door

          Comment

          Working...
          X