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How does the potable water get into the sewage lines?

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  • How does the potable water get into the sewage lines?

    Commerce City homes flood with sewage water | 9news.com

    COMMERCE CITY - Residents in a Commerce City neighborhood woke up to a rude surprise Tuesday morning. Sewage water had seeped into their houses affecting three blocks near Quince Street and 80th Avenue.
    "When I woke up this morning, I had a tub full of brown water, all that good stuff" said Wesley Spriggs, Commerce City resident. "Everything was just coming back up."
    A water main break is to blame - which flooded the sewage lines and forced raw sewage up into many people's basements.
    "As soon as I stepped down there, it was just about six inches of water down there," said Arturo Alderete, Commerce City resident. "Frightening to see my house like that."
    Alderete's in a basement bedroom. 8-year-old Jacob says he lost everything.
    "I had my bed, my clothes, my video games," said Jacob.
    Workers with the South Adams County Water and Sanitation went door-to-door talking to residents about the flooding.
    "Our priorities here is one to get that main break fixed and get that taken care of," said Jim Jones, district manager with South Adams County Water. "Two, help them clean up. That's the main thing we are trying to do right now."
    Jones brought out a private contractor to assess the damage, although it is not clear yet how much the city will have to replace.
    Residents are worried that personal property will not be replaced.
    "This is messed up, you know. It's really messed up," said Spriggs.
    (KUSA-TV © 2012 Multimedia Holdings Corporation)
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  • #2
    Re: How does the potable water get into the sewage lines?

    Poor/no maintenance plans leading to broken sewers.
    AllurePlumbing.com
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    Greensboro NC, Winston-Salem NC, High Point NC, Thomasville NC, Kernersville NC

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    • #3
      Re: How does the potable water get into the sewage lines?

      If they are in an area with combined sewers, the flow could overwhelm the system and back it up just like a heavy rain storm.

      If in a separate sewer system water could come in the sanitary system through an unintended cross connect with the storm system. That has been know to happen in parts of our city after a good rain storm.

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      • #4
        Re: How does the potable water get into the sewage lines?

        All it would take is a couple (or maybe only one) yard clean outs with missing caps in the flooded area .
        Last edited by Plumbus; 06-15-2012, 01:37 PM.

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        • #5
          Re: How does the potable water get into the sewage lines?

          It's called Inflow and Infiltration, more commonly known in the sewer industry as "I & I." The moisture in saturated soils is under a lot of pressure from the soils, so any compromise in a sewer is a path of least resistance for water, and it will push through anywhere it can and infiltrate the sewer pipe. I & I is present in every sewer system, and is the reason that sanitary sewer flows peak dramatically during heavy rains or spring snow melt, even in cities with separate storm sewer systems.

          There are many different places in a sewer system that can become I & I sites. Poor lateral connections, joints in concrete or clay pipe, root intrusion sites, broken spots in the sewer, manhole chimneys that are cracked, aging brick and mortar manholes, manhole/sewer connections, and so forth are all common sites for I & I. Everyone knows that a cast iron manhole street cap isn't watertight.

          I & I is a huge, huge problem as much of America's infrastructure has moved far beyond its reasonable life expectancy. Many, many taxpayer dollars are spent upgrading sewage treatment plants to handle higher peak flows due to massive I & I problems that are very difficult to track down. This is the driving force behind many of todays trenchless sewer rehab technologies, such as CIPP lining and point repair, chemical grouts, specialty epoxy coatings such as spray-on structural liners for rehabbing manholes, etc. It is also one of the major reasons why cities camera their lines on a regular basis as a preventative maintenance measure.

          If I were to guess, my five bucks would say that the neighborhood that was affected doesn't have a brand new PVC sewer, but rather an older one in need of some repairs.

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          • #6
            Re: How does the potable water get into the sewage lines?

            Won't happen at My house! #1 We are slab on grade , no basement. I installed [ it's code here] a sewer overflow devise just where My clean out is, 2 feet outside Our home. It has an Allum. cone,and inside is a big plastic ball that would rise if sewerage was backing up coming from My home or from the street. Sewerage would dump outside on the ground,never in the home. It's called a Contra Costa valve. Named after the county that first mandated them.
            I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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            • #7
              Re: How does the potable water get into the sewage lines?

              Originally posted by toolaholic View Post
              Won't happen at My house! #1 We are slab on grade , no basement. I installed [ it's code here] a sewer overflow devise just where My clean out is, 2 feet outside Our home. It has an Allum. cone,and inside is a big plastic ball that would rise if sewerage was backing up coming from My home or from the street. Sewerage would dump outside on the ground,never in the home. It's called a Contra Costa valve. Named after the county that first mandated them.
              Central Contra Costa Sanitary District : Sewer System : Overflows and FAQs : Overflow Protection Device

              Contra Costa Water District
              Last edited by Bob D.; 06-15-2012, 06:00 AM.
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              • #8
                Re: How does the potable water get into the sewage lines?

                Thank You Brother Bob
                I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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                • #9
                  Re: How does the potable water get into the sewage lines?

                  Originally posted by SewerRat View Post
                  This is the driving force behind many of todays trenchless sewer rehab technologies, such as CIPP lining and point repair, chemical grouts, specialty epoxy coatings such as spray-on structural liners for rehabbing manholes, etc. It is also one of the major reasons why cities camera their lines on a regular basis as a preventative maintenance measure.
                  Coincidentally, the local sewer district had a truck out on my street last week running a camera down the line. Since the sewers in my neighborhood are run in easements between and behind the houses, they were parked on the street and running the camera line above ground about 30' to the nearest manhole.
                  I struck up a conversation with one of the guys on the truck who I've known for a decade or more and he was telling me how the camera id's problem spots. For root infiltration they send a high pressure jetter hose down the line and it removes any intrusions and cleans the walls of the pipe. Then they send down a cable that can extrude a fiberglass material that fills any voids and makes the line water tight again. No external surgery required unless the integrity of the line is beyond repair. If he were still around, Ed Norton would be out of a job.

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