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  • shower pan inspection.... really?

    You have got to be kidding me... So, is this a bullsquat rule that our local Minneapolis board decided to implement? I just did a bathroom in a brand new home in Minneapolis, home owner is the general contractor. I've never done a shower in mpls before, and never ever needed a shower pan inspection in the past 8 years I've been doing this. Plumber or home owner never mentioned anything to me about it, not sure they were aware as the plumber doesn't usually work in mpls either. Anyway, inspector came to do a final and is not passing it due to no pan inspection. I haven't used a "pan liner" in over 2 years due to the, let's be frank, archaic nature, there's better options. Anyway, my base is backer board that is sloped(I'll show you pics later, i can't post them from my phone) and then 5 coatings of Redgard applied with a 1 1/2 nap roller. Corners have tile backer tape imbedded between layers 2 and 3 to increase strength. It's also a curbless shower, so the entire floor was coated including taped corners and coated up 3" on the wall (tile base) just for the heck of it. I'm kind of worried, but I did take pics, and I know redgard is approved for that use.... Am I screwed? I wasn't there, so I need to give him the pics and the redgard specs.

  • #2
    Re: shower pan inspection.... really?

    don't know anything about redguard. but a typical shower pan is water proofed up 12'' from the floor with solid backing and then over the threshold to the outside.

    shower pans are under our plumbing permit out here.

    of course the sub floor under the drain has to be sloped to the drain.

    hopefully he'll accept your photos and the installation is code approved. otherwise it's not going to be pretty.

    rick.
    phoebe it is

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    • #3
      Re: shower pan inspection.... really?

      You should have a pan liner. Sorry, but it sounds like you are hosed. Around here it is part of the rough in and the threshold needs to be cut down and trimmed due to the fact that the test height is beyond that of the threshold. I think the inspector should be held partially responsible for them missing it but if you plan on doing work in that area again...you will have to eat it. Have a sit down with your inspector for lunch one day and try to hash it out.
      AllurePlumbing.com
      • leak detection
      • drain cleaning
      • utility locating
      • conductor fault locating
      • and other specialties.

      Greensboro NC, Winston-Salem NC, High Point NC, Thomasville NC, Kernersville NC

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      • #4
        Re: shower pan inspection.... really?

        i had to pull and do a final for a stupid shower pan like three weeks ago.... busted trap had to demo out shower and new pan and hot mop and trap.... had to do a static water test for the inspector... he walked in for final and said hey how you doing .... ok looks good then walked out.... literally at the residence for 1-2 mins... lol

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        • #5
          Re: shower pan inspection.... really?

          Of all the inspections I have to pull, I believe in shower pan inspections the most. I've seen what a leaking pan can do...

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          • #6
            Re: shower pan inspection.... really?

            Originally posted by stolen View Post
            Of all the inspections I have to pull, I believe in shower pan inspections the most. I've seen what a leaking pan can do...


            i somewhat agree kinda.... i mean id rather have the water lines and drains lines and of course the gas lines inspected..... before the shower pan........

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            • #7
              Re: shower pan inspection.... really?

              Our inspectors back in NC would have crawled back under the shower area to make sure everything was dry while under test. Here? Not so much. I've not had an inspector even ask for a pressure test on my waste or water lines. Much less the shower pan.
              No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

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              • #8
                Re: shower pan inspection.... really?

                Originally posted by MoJourneyman View Post
                Our inspectors back in NC would have crawled back under the shower area to make sure everything was dry while under test. Here? Not so much. I've not had an inspector even ask for a pressure test on my waste or water lines. Much less the shower pan.
                What city? They barely look in a crawl space much less get in it...lol

                Who did you work for? I think you said the city was WS or am I confusing you with another?
                AllurePlumbing.com
                • leak detection
                • drain cleaning
                • utility locating
                • conductor fault locating
                • and other specialties.

                Greensboro NC, Winston-Salem NC, High Point NC, Thomasville NC, Kernersville NC

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: shower pan inspection.... really?

                  A small company that did spec homes for the most part out of Snead's Ferry. Worked Mostly in Jacksonville, and quite a bit on topsail Island.
                  No, it's not rocket science, it's plumbing and unlike rocket science it requires a license.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: shower pan inspection.... really?

                    I tested the pan, its an unfinished basement, there was NO LEAKS. I'll be damned if I half *** anything, as I am NOT going back to fix crap, did that once, NEVER AGAIN! I refuse to use pan liners, they suck, and Ive torn out more leaking pans than I care to remember that were install "correctly" but still leaked.

                    Here is what I did...
                    1 - Shower walls are covered with 1/2" USG Fiberock

                    2 - Coated walls with Custom Building Products (CBP) Redgard waterproofing (first coat) using 1-1/2" nap roller

                    3 - Plastic lath nailed to shower sub floor.

                    4 - 1/2" backer board screwed and adhered around premiter of shower

                    5 - Thinset is applied over lath with large notch trowel

                    6 - 1/2" USG Fiberock is installed over thinset w/ 7" round tapered cut hole, centered on hole for drain flange

                    7 - Using an impact driver, slowly tighten backer screws 2" apart in clockwise order around the drain until backer is sloped to correct slope per code (1/4 drop per foot)

                    8 - Fasten outter edge of 1/2" backer sheet on floor

                    9 - Coat entire floor and walls with 2 coats of CBP Redgard (2 coats now applied to floor, 3 on walls) (applied directly over lower drain clamping flange)

                    10 - Using fibercement mesh tape, apply to corners and all seams.

                    11 - Coat entire floor with 3 more coats of CBP RG and 1 coat on walls

                    12 - For extra water proofing (not required) 1/4" bead of silicone applied at floor/wall seam and corner seam on walls

                    13 - Install clamping flange for drain

                    14 - Plug drain base and fill with water up to outer area of shower (curbless edge) Drained after 1 hour with no leaks found

                    15 - Install drain strainer

                    16 - Tiled over walls and floor and grouted

                    17 - Sealed tile

                    (floor outside the shower was 2 layers of 1/2" backer installed with 3/8" notch trowel and galvanized roofing nails ever 4-6" so that it was slightly higher than the shower floor)

                    Pictures are coming soon...
                    Last edited by Alphacowboy; 06-20-2012, 11:24 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: shower pan inspection.... really?

                      BTW, CBP or requires 2 coats of its product to be applicable as a shower pan, I did 5. It is approved for shower pan application, and is approved in the national Plumbing code, its in their literature. The area around the bolt holes in the flange is about 3/32" thick, well over the specifications needed, as I said, I over kill, I don't hack stuff...
                      Attached Files

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                      • #12
                        Re: shower pan inspection.... really?

                        More Pics
                        Attached Files

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                        • #13
                          Re: shower pan inspection.... really?

                          I still do pans in polyethylene . Put a test plug in drain, fill to curb, mark waterline with magic marker , call for inspection next day. I know You do great work, how can
                          You eliminate a pan ? I am a follower of Michael Byrne " Setting Tile. I go to His extremes. No leaks. S.F. Has Pan inspections.
                          I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: shower pan inspection.... really?

                            Originally posted by Gettinit View Post
                            You should have a pan liner. Sorry, but it sounds like you are hosed. Around here it is part of the rough in and the threshold needs to be cut down and trimmed due to the fact that the test height is beyond that of the threshold. I think the inspector should be held partially responsible for them missing it but if you plan on doing work in that area again...you will have to eat it. Have a sit down with your inspector for lunch one day and try to hash it out.
                            It is a liner, just not the type that many use to use and some still do. RedGard is 100% approved by the national plumbing code for "pan liner use" but no idea why this guy had no idea what I was trying to tell him over the phone.

                            The final result of doing it this way is way better in my opinion, NO cement to suck up water and mold, walls and floor are COMPLETELY sealed, no way for water to enter them in anyway. The only thing that can get wet is thinset and grout, thats it. You can honestly stretch this stuff like a contractor garbage bag, it will literally stretch over 1/2-1" without tearing. If it tore, that means there is a GIANT problem in the house and a wall moved A LOT!

                            He made it sound as if the pictures and a description of what I did would sufice and that as long as I have the specifications from CBP on the use of it for a shower pan I would be ok, but obviously I hate not knowing at this point...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: shower pan inspection.... really?

                              I dont "eliminate the pan", I just move it to the area directly under the tile with a product that in my opinion makes old school pans a thing of the past. It not only replaces the pan, but it also acts as a crack isolation as well, something an old school rubber pan would never help with. Plus it puts the "liner" on the outside of the wall and all the way up to the top. No more wicking of moisture up a wall from a pan buried in cement.

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