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How to cap toilet flange

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  • #16
    Re: How to cap toilet flange

    Thanks Rick , And Blue Can. I just learned something new and valuable
    I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

    Comment


    • Toilet TrapCap
      Toilet TrapCap commented
      Editing a comment
      I've created a product to solve this issue, visit my site at TrapCap.com, or find me on Amazon.com, search for Toilet TrapCap. Lockout and seal the toilet flange while the toilet is removed or uninstalled during construction

  • #17
    Re: How to cap toilet flange

    Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
    Just got back in town from a 3 day vacation.

    Post a photo. A 4" diameter closet ring is very common out here with new construction plumbing.

    There is a simple fix. They make a 3" abs male pipe size closet flange that is about 3" long. It will glue right into the 4" pipe with no cutting. Run longer bolts through the old flange to double secure it to the pipe.

    Buy a common 4x3 wax ring and you'll be good to go with no problem.

    Post a photo to be sure. Hd has the 3" ring there too.

    Rick.
    Did the vacation involve Zip lining in Utah ?
    I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

    Comment


    • #18
      Re: How to cap toilet flange

      Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
      Just got back in town from a 3 day vacation.

      Post a photo. A 4" diameter closet ring is very common out here with new construction plumbing.

      There is a simple fix. They make a 3" abs male pipe size closet flange that is about 3" long. It will glue right into the 4" pipe with no cutting. Run longer bolts through the old flange to double secure it to the pipe.

      Buy a common 4x3 wax ring and you'll be good to go with no problem.

      Post a photo to be sure. Hd has the 3" ring there too.

      Rick.
      Hey Rick - did not see you posting recently so I guessed you might have been on vacation.

      Here is a photo. So are you suggesting leaving everything as is and gluing the new flange on top or removing those spacers first. Do the spacers just pull off or are they glued. Can I just glue a small section of pipe first if I need to raise the new flange to the new floor height.

      Is the install shown in the photo correct or should the bottom of the flange be sitting on top of the tile with the tile and sub-floor supporting the flange?

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      • #19
        Re: How to cap toilet flange

        The 2 white spacers look to be just sitting on the flange. Normally they need to be siliconed down.

        Remove the spacers, clean the wax and the inside of the abs pipe where the new ring will glue down. Do a dry fit first. The flange is suppose to sit ontop of the finish surface/ tile floor.

        Went to Palm springs and the snow ontop the tram at 8200'.

        How close is legoland to you?

        Rick.
        phoebe it is

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        • #20
          Re: How to cap toilet flange

          Okay I think I get it and that's a great solution if it works - pull the spacers finish the floor with the new extra sub-flooring and tile cut to support the new flange and then glue the new flange down as the final step into the old flange. I will get the flange and dry fit/experiment first. It's going to be a little while before I need to get to that stage anyway as I need to finish tiling the lower section/pan of the shower first.

          I'm in the Scripps Ranch area of SD which is about 30 miles from Carlsbad where Legoland is.

          Comment


          • #21
            Re: How to cap toilet flange

            Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
            There is a simple fix. They make a 3" abs male pipe size closet flange that is about 3" long. It will glue right into the 4" pipe with no cutting. Run longer bolts through the old flange to double secure it to the pipe. Rick.
            Rick
            Correct me if I'm wrong. A 3x4 hub (female) abs closet flange, which is approximately 4" od can be solvent welded into a 4" pipe. A 3" abs male pipe size closet flange" which is approximately 3-1/2" od, will not.

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            • #22
              While doing remodels, I usually stuff some rags in a plastic bag and shove it in the pipe. Comes out easy enough and you just toss the bag when done.

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              • #23
                while that might be fine for keeping debris from falling in, it will not completely seal off sewer gas and if you get a stoppage, you wished you spent the $4.00 for an expansion plug.

                in the old days we called these dollar plugs. now with inflation we call them $4.00 plugs.

                Rick,
                phoebe it is

                Comment


                • #24
                  I'm curious what the street that supply house is on, that's a very common issue with a very simple solution. Ferguson plumbing supply in Kearny Mesa will have more offerings and you are likely to get good advice. There is quite a number of good supply houses in town that are less expensive but further out from SR

                  Comment


                  • blue_can
                    blue_can commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Yes I agree - solder is a good way to go. However there are also downsides including the effort to prep the pipe, draining down the system thoroughly to make sure water in the pipes don;t cause issues and the risk of burning the place down. I also have a torch with a hose and it is self igniting - I just clip the cylinder to my waist and can trigger the torch on and off on and off with the push button - I find that much more convenient than the torches that fit directly to the cylinder. In fact I've never own one like that.

                  • Mightyservant
                    Mightyservant commented
                    Editing a comment
                    I still have my goofy "starter" torch I used to change a water heater on my first house. I borrowed the shops RIGID set once and quickly realized that the size of the nozzle and flame quality really makes a difference. After being sent out to do a 2 1/2" silver soldered underground supply which ended up leaking in the bottom side of an ellbow located in deep trench, I learned that using a wet dry vac to dewater and dry out the pipe was ideal for difficult repairs. Even at home when I'm making improvements, I'll shut the supply,drain the system, open a faucet to vent the pipe and attach a vacum to remove all the water. Clearly it's cumbersome but you don't have the benefit of open walls when your renovating and it can get nerve racking when a joint leaks. It's much more liberating when you have a tool that heats only the joint and not pouring flames not only to the joint but the structure, ducts, wire, etc.
                    Last edited by Mightyservant; 05-20-2017, 09:50 AM.

                  • blue_can
                    blue_can commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Yes I'm sure a better torch would help. I would invest in one if I did this kind of work for a living. I've toyed with the idea of getting a decent oxy-acetylene rig but never really had a reason to invest in one - I will get one if I ever had to change out my HVAC system or any other kind of brazing work. I do have a Lincoln Electric Mig welder that gets occasional use.
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