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Dehumidifier Recommendations

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  • Dehumidifier Recommendations

    I'm in an inner-city neighborhood (140 year old home on the East Coast). My basement is damp and shows such with moisture spots on the walls. I'm looking for a dehumidifier that I can connect to a drain or run to my sump pump. 56'x25 basement.

    I'm hearing of others who have to replace their units every 2 or 3 years. Are their any units that are more durable?

    Any help is appreciated.
    Regards,
    K. Nezz

  • #2
    Re: Dehumidifier Recommendations

    99% of store bought units are pure crap. Expect it. They don't last. If you want to spend more money on something longer lasting, consider contacting your local heating rep in regards to a whole house version of a dehumidifier. They can be sized to dehumidify zones such as the cellar only.

    Also consider where the water may be coming from - bad gutters, misplaced downspouts, poor grading, poor or plugged drainage. Resolving the water problems may go a much longer way to solving your cellar water issues.
    ~~

    ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

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    • #3
      Re: Dehumidifier Recommendations

      Thanks for thr response.

      The house is up there in age. It would require major excavation in the front or back. I'm not in the mood for any of that yet.

      Any suggestions on brand and make. I just need to do the basement area as I don't have any issues on the upper 3 levels.
      Regards,
      K. Nezz

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      • #4
        Re: Dehumidifier Recommendations

        I can't recommend any of them. Go to a big box store and pick your poison. Expect only a few years of service.
        Last edited by Plumber Punky; 05-12-2013, 03:17 PM.
        ~~

        ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

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        • #5
          Re: Dehumidifier Recommendations

          Have you considered or is it possible to paint the walls with one of the various moisture barrier paints that are on the market? Being a 140 year old home, I can only assume that it's a stone wall. Is there a cement floor or dirt? Can you figure out the main source of the moisture? If any of these issues can be addressed, it will mean a lot less work on a dehumidifier.

          Ron

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          • #6
            Re: Dehumidifier Recommendations

            consumer reports is a good place to check for recommendations on products, imo. I've had great success in purchasing their picks.

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            • #7
              Re: Dehumidifier Recommendations

              In 2007 I bought a Danby 58-pint dehumidifier (Model No. DR586R) from qualitymatters.com. I paid around $200.00 and must have got free shipping because I would have found one locally rather than pay the cost of shipping a 25-pound item.

              I have a high water table and use the unit in my 800-sq. ft. basement, mostly spring and summer. It's still going strong as I write.

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              • #8
                Re: Dehumidifier Recommendations

                Originally posted by Knezz View Post
                Thanks for thr response.

                The house is up there in age. It would require major excavation in the front or back. I'm not in the mood for any of that yet.

                Any suggestions on brand and make. I just need to do the basement area as I don't have any issues on the upper 3 levels.
                Fixing grading issues does not necessarily mean you need to do excavation work, it could be as easy as getting out there with an iron rake and shovel and pitching the ground with about a one inch per foot slope for 4 to 6 feet out from the foundation. Making sure your gutters are in good shape (no leaks) and the downspouts don't dump water next to the foundation is very important, extend them out from the house 4 to 6 feet also. No dehumidifier can overcome the thousands of gallons of rain water that your roof can collect or pools of standing water because the ground pitches back toward the foundation. Doesn't matter if the house is 200 or 2 years old. If you do have a rubble foundation, they are made with a motar that is not as good as that used today. Being in MD they may have used crushed oyster or clam shells in the mix which water can have an affect on over time. If you have water moving through your foundation walls it is slowly destroying the motar that holds it all together.

                Solve the water problem AND get a dehumidifier. But if you can only do one solve the water problem at the source.
                "When we build let us think we build forever. Let it not be for present delight nor for present use alone. Let it be such work that our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone upon stone, that a time is to come when these stones will be held sacred because our hands have touched them, and that men will say, as they look upon the labor and wrought substance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."
                John Ruskin (1819 - 1900)

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