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Must I use blue primer/cleaner on 1-1/2 inch PVC draining new vanity?

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  • Must I use blue primer/cleaner on 1-1/2 inch PVC draining new vanity?

    I can't find the can of primer I had.
    Thank you.
    I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
    It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
    "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

  • #2
    Re: Must I use blue primer/cleaner on 1-1/2 inch PVC draining new vanity?

    I use only red hot glue, no primer needed !
    I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

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    • #3
      Re: Must I use blue primer/cleaner on 1-1/2 inch PVC draining new vanity?

      most municipalities require the use of some sort of primer/cleaner. Color or lack of it (UV reactive for example) usually makes no difference. Though, coloring is usually based upon it's usage.

      Primers | Oatey

      Cleaners | Oatey

      The glue is also colored for application. Blue is for wet external applications.

      PVC Cements | Oatey

      Specialty Cements | Oatey

      Using a primer/cleaner is just good practice anyway.


      Originally posted by toolaholic View Post
      I use only red hot glue, no primer needed !
      Originally posted by oatey.com
      where local codes permit.
      ~~

      ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

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      • #4
        Re: Must I use blue primer/cleaner on 1-1/2 inch PVC draining new vanity?

        I used primer 30 years ago and found out that it made the joints not pressure ready nearly as fast as using just plain clear cement. Haven't used primer since. Repairs that we do aren't inspected. So I don't have to worry about having the tell tale purple color on the joints. We don't have any leaks and have never had a joint come apart except for the few that I forgot to add glue to.
        Frequently asked questions about pumps and tanks.

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        • #5
          Re: Must I use blue primer/cleaner on 1-1/2 inch PVC draining new vanity?

          I've had to repair ceilings where unprimed PVC joints let go. Had one where the glue was clearly visible on the entire joint, yet it popped apart and leaked.

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          • #6
            Re: Must I use blue primer/cleaner on 1-1/2 inch PVC draining new vanity?

            I've had to repair ceilings where unprimed PVC joints let go. Had one where the glue was clearly visible on the entire joint, yet it popped apart and leaked.
            I wonder if the glue used wasn't fresh?
            Frequently asked questions about pumps and tanks.

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            • #7
              Re: Must I use blue primer/cleaner on 1-1/2 inch PVC draining new vanity?

              Originally posted by speedbump View Post
              I wonder if the glue used wasn't fresh?
              Not sure, but I have seen it more than once. Seems to be the only failure I have seen with PVC though. ABS on the other hand, never joint failures but I've seen numerous lengthwise cracked kitchen sink lines. I think we've replaced a half dozen or more in the past 10 years. Most of the time the home owner had no idea until we started demo work. Only to find a wet nasty oily mess in the wall/ceiling that probably was leaking for quite some time.

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              • #8
                Re: FOUND THE PRIMER/CLEANER and used it.

                Assumed that my old glue is too old.
                The new solvent weld glue is DARK GRAY. Never saw that before.
                I'd take an educated guess - but I'm unqualified.
                It ain't just soot, it's paydirt.
                "I swear, wherever Gift goes, argument follows." -Youtube comment

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: FOUND THE PRIMER/CLEANER and used it.

                  You will see joint failures due to improper use of primer in larger pressurized pipes such as farm irrigation pipelines. If you notice, the instructions on the primer bottle always says to "avoid puddling." That is because a puddle of primer will soften that spot in the hub of the PVC joint too much, and it seems to remain weak afterwards, as sometimes you will see the bottom of the joint break loose and leak under pressure. There are pipelines around here that have had multiple joint failures in one pipeline, all identical - leaking at the bottom where the primer ran freely.

                  My personal belief is that if you are careless with primer you are probably better off without it, but if used correctly you will have a better joint. That is on pressure applications, though, not drainage.

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                  • #10
                    Re: FOUND THE PRIMER/CLEANER and used it.

                    I agree, with Primer properly used, it does make a better joint. But don't turn the water on right away after making the joint. When I saw that 2" coupling moving out of the corner of my eye, it was too late to avoid the shower I got.

                    The only large irrigation pipe I worked with had the belled ends with the o-rings. Butter them up and slam them home.
                    Frequently asked questions about pumps and tanks.

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                    • #11
                      Re: FOUND THE PRIMER/CLEANER and used it.

                      Originally posted by speedbump View Post
                      I agree, with Primer properly used, it does make a better joint. But don't turn the water on right away after making the joint. When I saw that 2" coupling moving out of the corner of my eye, it was too late to avoid the shower I got.

                      The only large irrigation pipe I worked with had the belled ends with the o-rings. Butter them up and slam them home.
                      Pipe is bell and spigot but fittings are often hubbed.

                      Comment

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