Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Slip Lining for house main

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Slip Lining for house main

    Hi all and thanks in advance for any light you can shed on this project for me. First let me state that I realize this is a HUGE project, but I do have some professional contractor help at my disposal once we get down to getting things done (with many pieces of equipment I will need at little to no cost) and pro guidance on using them right. That said, these "helpers" are very busy people (like you all) and I want to have as much knowledge and be as prepared as possible for when that time comes. Here goes.

    Our house is located (as the pipe flows) about 1200' from the street. The meter is at the street location. It is a subdivision and each properties water lines run next to each other from the street until they turn off to each residence. Our residence was built and occupied as of 1992. Location is Kauai, Hawaii. Whoever did the original install of the main lines to each property did some things wrong (probably more than I will ever know) and as a result, we have had 3 leaks in that line coming up to the house THIS YEAR ALONE. I am sick of searching for the leak, digging it up and repairing it, so we have decided to "slip line" the current Sch40 1.5" crappy PVC with DR9 HDPE (or DR7 in SIDR). Here are my questions and thanks again for bearing with me on this large and complex project.

    1. We don't need 1.5" feed as far as I know (1500 sq ft house with 2 people living in it), and it was originally installed with that because this used to be ag land. I know I can use 1" hdpe CTS, but can I use 1.25" CTS? I know it will fit (with about 0.25" diameter play from what I understand about the ID/OD of these pipes), but am not sure how well this will slide through (I was told we will be using a couple of quarts of some type of grease to make the slide easier). I am digging up all 90deg fittings on the current line where we will feed the new HDPE through to before moving into the next section, but am wondering if there is anything else here I am not thinking of. Also, after spending hours of searching for information on ID/OD of different pipes, I have found that I can use 1" SIDR7 or 1.25" SDR9 to get my 200 psi and quarter inch clearance through the old PVC. As far as fittings go, which one is better to work with, the CTS or the IPS pipe sizes?

    2. When I dig up the 90deg bends and cut them out of the pvc so the HDPE can make the turn with a softer radius, I want to still have the HDPE inside pvc just for the added protection. I am figuring I will use the heat gun to bend some 1.5" pvc in a soft arc and run the HDPE through that, then into the next section. Overkill? Better ideas on how to do this? Any thoughts appreciated.

    3. Currently, the nearest shut off valve is about 600' from the house. I want one closer. Any thoughts on what to use here (ball valve, gate valve, other)? I am thinking right outside the house for location (and then leave the one 600 ft away to allow me to isolate leak locations in the future - I do realize that I will have to dig this one up and reinstall it with the HDPE running through it).

    4. The water pressure in the house is far too high (about 105 psi) and I want to install a regulator as long as we are doing all this other work. Some have said down at the meter is the best location as it protects your entire line, but I might want the higher pressure to some of my hose bibs shy of the house, and the HDPE DR9/7 should not have any problem with that. Any thoughts on this topic (i.e. what regulator to buy, where to install, tips/tricks on installation of these units)?

    Thanks for taking the time to read and share your advice/knowledge on this topic. I am sure I will have more questions as we get closer to judgement day and appreciate all the help I can get. If there are any considerations I am not considering here, please raise my awareness. I do undertand that we will have significantly less water volume from these new pipes, but I don't think it will affect our household.

    Cheers~
    W

  • #2
    Re: Slip Lining for house main

    Would it be possible to abandon the existing line in place and trench in a new one?

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Slip Lining for house main

      Originally posted by Big Jim View Post
      Would it be possible to abandon the existing line in place and trench in a new one?
      Thanks for the reply Jim. It would be possible for about 35% of the run but not the other 65%.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Slip Lining for house main

        You mentioned you live in a tract home development.
        I had a similar job 15 years ago, although it was only 900'. But it was a hillside and 2" pipe. Thee was a fire hydrant about 150' from the house. Had the city install the new meter off the hydrant main even though the customer had to pay for the new meter install, they saved big money on the balance of the project.

        Is there another way to supply water closer? A hydrant possibly? Can you get the homeowners to run a new common 4" main and then all tap off of it much closer to the property with your meters. Especially now with electronically read meters.

        Have you heard of epoxy lining of the pipes or a blown in epoxy liner?

        Hawaii isn't that far from los angeles. Might need to pay a visit

        Rick.
        phoebe it is

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Slip Lining for house main

          I answered on the HDD forum.
          Seattle Drain Service

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Slip Lining for house main

            Thanks for the replies Rick and Cuda (including your reply on HDD Cuda). No way I can do the pipe bursting you mentioned on HDD Cuda because the 600' run from street to our driveway has all other pipes laid maybe 1" away from ours. I will not take the chance of the bursting forcing a rock or something into a neighbors pipe that I then have to repair. I would prefer to implement one method for this job rather than mixing them so trenching part and slipping another part or bursting part and trenching another part is not my preferred system.

            Rick, I have heard of the epoxy lining, but have not seen much material on it (spec sheets, white papers, project example descriptions, forum posts, etc.). If you can direct me to any of that kind of stuff, I would like to take a look. I will do a search on that topic right now. I am kind of frustrated with the size I am being forced down to with the HDPE options. Reason being, we have a 1.5" PVC pipe, with an actual ID of about 1.6x", and the 1-1/4" HDPE has an ID of only 1.069 (in CTS size). So I am literally losing 1/2" in the ID size even though I am only going down 1/4" in "pipe size" (I do realize they are sized/measured differently but still frustrating). Just wish I could move down 1/4" and have it only move the ID down 1/4" as well.

            As for having the rest of the properties go along with a 4" and split off wherever, it will not fly with them or the municipal water supply. And there is no way muni is going to let us move the meter closer to the house.

            Thanks again for the feedback.

            Aloha~
            W

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Slip Lining for house main

              You are not going to like this but there is no easy cheap way. I would use air (called an air knife) around the beginning with the other lines pvc cracks so easy digging. Then at some point you should separate your line from the neighbors. (being in the same trench is stupid just for this reason) Plot a new path that will cost the least whether it is directional drilling, hand digging, air moles, etc. Or fix (patch your current line again) and wait until another neighbors goes through this and then see how the participation runs. The biggest problem with shared trenches is you pay some guy like me then 6 months later a neighbor has a leak and they will think the contractor (or you) must have nicked their PVC with a shovel because they never had any problems until your line was done. I have seen it many times it is not so great to be the first in this type of problem.
              Last edited by Cuda; 10-09-2013, 10:22 PM.
              Seattle Drain Service

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Slip Lining for house main

                What a mess.

                David

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Slip Lining for house main

                  Oh yeah...................!!!

                  I ran across a water corp truck here doing a CIPL on a 20mm cu running across a road. I though it was ridiculous but they reckon opening the road was going to cost P for plenty. I would run a new line and not stuff around with trying to slip line. do it right the first time..............!!!!!!!

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X