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Replacing a basement utility sink, and other plumbing questions

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  • Replacing a basement utility sink, and other plumbing questions

    I bought a 3 bay stainless restaurant sink and want to install it into my basement, replacing a plastic utility sink. I have a few questions about how to best do this.

    Here is the spot it will go, between the gray cabinet on the left and the blue frame on the right:

    The supply lines are unsupported, and the white material is some sort of insulation blanket that is stapled on the top and bottom. Do I need to somehow support those copper lines? I'd like to install 1/4 turn ball valve shutoffs as well.

    Here is the wall mount faucet:

    I salvaged a couple of the cast copper backside mounts, and am considering using the 1/2" brass close nipples, and using cut rubber on the backside in case there is any play. Regarding making the connection, my thought is to install flexible supply lines between the copper supply and the cast pieces above. Good? Bad?

    Here is the current drain assembly:

    I'd like to keep the current trap if possible. Would I cut the high point of that small spacing (where it says D-2 in red) and install a 90 to go from horizontal into this?

    The new drain assembly, I think is complete:

    Going from left to right, I am putting in a cleanout on the end, and then sloping the tailpieces enough to drain into the trap above. Not shown is the PVC drain pipe to put it all together.

    Finally, the stainless strainers:

    I put these in with a rope of plumbers putting on the top side between the strainer flange and sink. Tightened down with a spanner wrench while someone held the basket from the top side. I believe I take out the plastic insert and mount in the flanged end of the tailpiece.


    Thanks in advance. I'll post pics when complete.

  • #2
    Well, the install went mostly smooth, but I learned a few things. Sorry for the poor quality images.


    The legs weren't high enough, so I had to raise the sink by putting wood under them. The horizontal pipe exiting the trap was high to the point where it was roughly at the bottom of the sink, and would not have drained. I'll replace the legs with longer ones, they are just galvanized fence posts. I can actually go higher thanks to the extra I left on the drain tailpieces.


    The existing trap could not accept the planned drain after the last one, so the splice had to be made between. I could not find a basic tee, so had to use a sanitary tee, and its bend is friendly with the cleanout on the left end. Behind this tee is a street 90 that goes directly into the trap. The pipe coming out of the trap is lower than the combined drain, the pic's angle does not make this apparent.

    I mounted a brass hose bibb on the cold side. This involved step drilling a hole for the supply, and also 2 holes for mounting screws. This faucet is nice for a cooling process I need (I am a home brewer). Before, this monopolized the single faucet, so I was without water during this sometimes lengthy process. Now I can run hot and cold while the brass faucet is busy.

    Flex connectors (1/2" x 1/2") are nice for making the connections from the supply lines to the pipe behind the sink's wall.

    Mounting the chrome plated faucet worked out well having teflon taped the close nipples, and making spacer washers out of thick rubber packing.

    Installing shutoffs overhead in the supply lines made it easy to isolate the sink project without having the whole house down for the 3 hours I was hammering away at it.

    I have a new found respect for the plumbing trade. From a homeowner's perspective, I have the luxury of time, but have to deal with multiple runs to the hardware store and adapting design to unexpected changes. To be able to anticipate and avoid problems, size up the solution and do it correctly the first time is the mark of a professional, and deserves admiration.

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    • #3
      Having installed more than my share of 3 compartment sinks, the legs look more like stainless steel than galvanized. In either case, mfg's make a plastic "foot" insert that is adjustable. I'd look for a used restaurant equipment supply house in your local area.

      AP

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ArizonaPlumber View Post
        Having installed more than my share of 3 compartment sinks, the legs look more like stainless steel than galvanized. In either case, mfg's make a plastic "foot" insert that is adjustable. I'd look for a used restaurant equipment supply house in your local area.

        AP
        Thanks. These are actually made from an 8' galvanized fence posts I bought at Lowes. I'll look for some sort of leveler.

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        • #5
          Nice job joe.

          off subject, but how did you get all your photos to post in your thread?

          my 1000's of photos are all in limbo and no longer posted. Not sure how you did yours before the forum upgrade, but it looks good and is viewable.

          Rick.
          phoebe it is

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          • Josh
            Josh commented
            Editing a comment
            Rick, Your images are being worked on right now. We think we have the fix for all your old posts. Just hang tight.

        • #6
          Originally posted by JoePolvino View Post
          Thanks. These are actually made from an 8' galvanized fence posts I bought at Lowes. I'll look for some sort of leveler.
          Looks like you did a good job solving all the issues that can crop up with 3 compartment sinks.

          Since the legs were made from a cheap and readily available material, have you considered simply making longer legs?

          BTW, nice job solving the faucet mounting issue with the spacers. I know a lot of plumbers who get frustrated trying to get the spacing to jibe with the proper amount of tightening needed to prevent leaks. A slick way to make backsplash mounted faucets easier to install is to use T+S Brass's B-0230-K mounting kit. It wholesales for around $32 and makes mounting those faucets a snap.


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          • #7
            Looking at the pictures again, it looks like you used boards to raise the sink up by 1 1/2". If that's true, you could get that 1 1/2" back by using 2" x 1 1/2" bushings along with male trap adapters (saving you 3/4" of height) and a street 90 to go into the hub of the 90 that looks up from the side of your trap (saving the other 3/4" needed).

            As I mentioned above, you got it figured out and my fitting changes are only suggestions, not criticisms.

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            • #8
              I used photobucket and used the IMG tags it provides.

              The trap was already glued up, but I was able to cut a vertical to preserve just enough material to accept the 90. Otherwise, I would have used the street 90 like you suggested. And yes, the magic intersection of tightening and securing the faucet to that back wall was definitely on my mind! The rubber packing sheet was just what I needed.

              Did I do the sanitary tee properly? I had to lay it on its side, and the curved piece points back toward the trap. The left and middle sinks flow into this curved piece like they should, but the right sink flow doesn't. I guess it doesn't really matter, they all drain just fine, and the cleanout end is compatible with the curve it will see...just curious that's all.

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              • #9
                A cross at the center sink outlet would be a better option than the tee on it's side.

                David

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                • #10
                  Pro Tip: After you crack open the main water shutoff a quarter turn and confirm no leaks, be sure to then open it all the way, otherwise you might be puzzled for 5 days as to the cause of low water flow when taking a shower. :^)

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