Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Flaring degrees

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Flaring degrees

    It is time for me to buy a new flaring tool. I noticed that some are set at 37 degrees and others at 45 degrees. I'll be doing primarily natural gas and water line work. I don't remember the packages of flare nuts listing a particular degree. What would you recommend I buy?
    Thanks,

  • #2
    Originally posted by WStemp:
    It is time for me to buy a new flaring tool. I noticed that some are set at 37 degrees and others at 45 degrees. I'll be doing primarily natural gas and water line work. I don't remember the packages of flare nuts listing a particular degree. What would you recommend I buy?
    Thanks,
    Most plumbing applications would require a 45 degree flare.

    the dog
    the dog

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by WStemp:
      It is time for me to buy a new flaring tool. I noticed that some are set at 37 degrees and others at 45 degrees. I'll be doing primarily natural gas and water line work. I don't remember the packages of flare nuts listing a particular degree. What would you recommend I buy?
      Thanks,
      plumbdog10 is correct, 37 degree flares are used for mostly for hydraulic fittings.

      Mark
      "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

      I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

      Comment


      • #4
        My reply was a little haste, big suprise. After re-reading you mentioned that you are working with gas and water. My original post stands, because the 45 degree flare is standard for both. But s you are working with high pressure gas, or water, in an industrial setting, you may need the 37 degree flare, because it has a much higher pressure rating.

        But, if you are dealing with standard plumbing applications, you will be right to us a 45 degree flaring tool.

        the dog
        the dog

        Comment


        • #5
          GUY'S A LITTLE OFF SUBJECT.

          DOES ANYONE STILL USE A LOCKRIDGE TOOL FOR CHROME SPAGETTI? I STILL HAVE MY 3/8'', 7/16'' AND 1/2''. HAVN'T USED THESE IN 10 YEARS. JUST THOUGHT AS A FLARING TOOL IS ALMOST RIGHT UP THERE FOR MY WORK.

          RICK.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK:
            GUY'S A LITTLE OFF SUBJECT.

            DOES ANYONE STILL USE A LOCKRIDGE TOOL FOR CHROME SPAGETTI? I STILL HAVE MY 3/8'', 7/16'' AND 1/2''. HAVN'T USED THESE IN 10 YEARS. JUST THOUGHT AS A FLARING TOOL IS ALMOST RIGHT UP THERE FOR MY WORK.

            RICK.
            I haven't seen one in years. As I'm sure you're aware,even most grade A specifications call for stainless flex connectors these days. But back when, I really didn't use one much. If I was using spegetti flexes I normally ordered the ones factory installed on the angle stops. For the straight shafts I generally lightly pinched the end with channel locks, deforming it just enough to prevent it's escape.
            the dog

            Comment


            • #7
              By the way,

              I'm currently at the tail end of a factory move project. There were a number of small hydrolic tubes that had to be slighly re-routed. This was the first time I had used a flaring tool in a long time. There are so many compression type fittings available now, flare joints are not as common as they used to be.

              the dog

              [ 08-06-2005, 04:07 PM: Message edited by: plumbdog10 ]
              the dog

              Comment


              • #8
                Rick,

                I still have a drawer full of beading tools and friction rings (3/8 – 7/16 – 1/2). I avoided the SS flexes for a long time. Once I finally decided to use them it was on a 13 story condominium building. After installing a 1000 or so flexes one ruptured in the middle of the night.

                When the flexes were first made the inter tubing had no integrity without the SS braiding. They use to pinch the braiding under the sleeve with the tubing during a manual assembly. What they found was the employee who assembled the line did not insert the braiding in far enough.

                Once the braiding pulled out the inter tubing turned into a water balloon then exploded. BrassCraft paid to clean up the mess and for us to change all of the flexes. Today’s flexes do not need the SS braiding as the inter tubing is reinforced.

                Mark
                "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                Comment


                • #9
                  MARK, REMEMBER THE PLASTIC FLEX HOSES. WHAT WAS WORSE WAS THE PLASTIC HOSES WITH THE PLASTIC BARBS TO CRIMP THE HOSE ON. SEEN MANY HOT WATER LINES COME APART. I NEVER USE THE PLASTIC FLEXES FOR THIS REASON. THE NEWER BRASSCRAFT ARE A TYPE OF PLASTIC/ POLYMER BRAID. VERY NICE AND IMMUNE FROM THE CHEMICALS TYPICALLY FOUND UNDER SINKS.

                  WHOOPS, THE WIFE IS CALLING, TIME TO GO TO A BARBEQUE. "I'LL BE BACK"

                  RICK.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Rick,

                    I’ve never used the plastic flexes but repaired lots of them. I still like a stick of 7/16 and a bending spring but I do use the SS braided flexes. The new BrassCraft polymer braided are the way to go. The stainless braid is history as soon as anything with ammonia hits it.

                    Oddly enough I did have a case with a polymer flex on a water closet. It was a big house in Bel Air which was builtlike a museum. The plumber installed SS braided all over the house but ran out at the end of the job and picked up the water closet flexes at Home Depot.

                    After final he had his helper cut all of the tags off of the flexes with a utility knife. Of course it was not a problem on the SS supplies and he didn’t realize the water closets were polymer. Guess what burst from a knife cut in the middle of the night and did hundreds of thousands in damages.

                    The part that got me on this job was the couple who owned the home were in their mid 20s. This house was easily twelve million before this recent surge in California real estate value.

                    Mark
                    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ToUtahNow:
                      Rick,

                      I’ve never used the plastic flexes but repaired lots of them. I still like a stick of 7/16 and a bending spring but I do use the SS braided flexes. The new BrassCraft polymer braided are the way to go. The stainless braid is history as soon as anything with ammonia hits it.

                      Oddly enough I did have a case with a polymer flex on a water closet. It was a big house in Bel Air which was builtlike a museum. The plumber installed SS braided all over the house but ran out at the end of the job and picked up the water closet flexes at Home Depot.

                      After final he had his helper cut all of the tags off of the flexes with a utility knife. Of course it was not a problem on the SS supplies and he didn’t realize the water closets were polymer. Guess what burst from a knife cut in the middle of the night and did hundreds of thousands in damages.

                      The part that got me on this job was the couple who owned the home were in their mid 20s. This house was easily twelve million before this recent surge in California real estate value.

                      Mark
                      Where was this project located?
                      the dog

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Bel Air
                        "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                        I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          MARK, SOUNDS A LOT LIKE THE SUNDAY MORNING WAKE UP CALL I GOT 10 YEARS AGO IN THE TROUSDALE ESTATES OF BEVERLY HILLS.
                          IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT THE OWNER WOKE UP TO RUNNING WATER. HE SHUT THE WATER OFF TO THE HOUSE AND CALLED ME IN THE MORNING, 6:30 AM. HE WAS A GOOD CUSTOMER THAT OWNS APTS I WORK AT.

                          WENT THERE TO LOCATE THE PROBLEM. THE S.S. FLEX UNDER THE DISHWASHER HAD RUPTURED. I DISCONNECTED THE FLEX AND CAPPED THE 3/8'' LINE AT THE ANGLE STOP. TURNED ON THE WATER, TESTED AND LEFT. CHARGED HIM $50. AND WENT HOME.

                          HERE IS THE KICKER. IN A PERIOD OF 6 MONTHS, I MUST HAVE RECIEVED OVER A DOZEN PHONE CALLS FROM THE INSURANCE CO., EXPERTS, AND EVEN A "ROCKET SCIENTIST".
                          I TOLD THEM THAT I WENT THERE TO FIND THE LEAK AND TURN THE WATER BACK ON TO THE HOUSE ONLY. I DIDN'T TAKE INVENTORY OF THE PROPERTY DAMAGE. ALTHOUGH WITH A 100 GALLON HEATER, THERE WAS A LOT OF CONDESATION DRIPPING FROM THE CEILING. THE HOUSE WAS ON A SLAB AND THE MAJORITY OF THE HOUSE WAS A LOWER LEVEL.

                          THE MORAL OF THE STORY WAS, EITHER I SHOULD HAVE CHARGED HIM MORE TO COVER ALL MY TIME, OR NOT ANSWER THE PHONE ON SUNDAY MORNINGS.

                          MARK WERE YOU THE ROCKET SCIENTIST I SPOKE TO?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            LOL - No that doesn't sound like one I ever was involved with.

                            The shop I started out with was E.L. Payne in Beverly Hills. They had been there since 1914 so Beverly Hills, Bel Air and Trousdale Estates were all part of the area I worked daily. I found the people in Trousdale to be the hardest to work for.

                            We even had one guy who was the founder of one of the largest Plumbing Supply house in LA who use to have us charge him labor only and he would send us the parts.

                            Mark
                            "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                            I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X