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  • Shower Valve Repair...

    Hello Plumbing Guys!

    Please forgive me, but I have a question that's probably insulting to some of you. In short, I'm NOT a plumber by any stretch of the imagination.

    My wife and I rent an oldish home that has the 3-valve style setup [Hot-Shower-Cold] where each valve protrudes out of a ceramic tile wall. As the entire shower area--above the bathtub--is covered in tile, I'm a bit apprehensive about the repair I'm going to ask about, so please keep this in mind.

    The problem is that, when you turn the middle valve fully CCW to divert water to the shower head, most of the water continues to flow into the tub. Some water does flow out of the shower head, but quite a bit continues to flow through the tub faucet [enough to eventually overwhelm the drain's ability to do its thing].

    To begin with, I turned the outer house supply valve off, removed the screws on two of the valve handles and then removed both handles. After that, I removed both decorative "stem covers" to facilitate a look at the valves themselves. The difference I noticed was that the cold water valve stem [the one that works properly] had a threaded teflon cover running nearly the full length of the valve stem, while the shower valve stem had only a partial [previously damaged] teflon cover.

    Next, I removed the threaded brass bushing [the one that fits over the valve stem] from the shower valve to see what I could see. What I saw in there appears to be a thick rubber "packing bushing" of some kind that looks distorted and out of round.

    As I alluded to earlier, I'm apprehensive about going any further back [behind the tile] with my tools, so I thought I'd ask for a clue first: DOES THE BRASS BUSHING I REMOVED [THE ONE THAT FITS OVER THE VALVE STEM] HOLD THE ENTIRE INNER VALVE ASSEMBLY IN PLACE? THAT IS, ONCE THAT BUSHING IS REMOVED, AM I SUPPOSED TO BE ABLE TO REMOVE THE "GUTS" OF THE VALVE?

    Once I removed the bushing, I fiddled with the valve stem a bit to see if it would loosen--it didn't. Perhaps there's another [larger] bushing holding the valve guts in place [one behind the outer surface of the tile]?

    Anyway, I'd really appreciate a primer on how these types of valves are put together. We've got a tribe of folks coming for turkey [and to sleep over], and I can't find anyone to repair this before the holiday. I'm hoping I can somehow disassemble the valve, buy the guts and rebuild the valve. I'd really appreciate any and all thoughts on this.

    Have a great day... [img]smile.gif[/img]

  • #2
    When u took the handle and escussion off..You saw the threaded nylon piece..It was broken prob. b/c someone has worked on that faucet before...I think what u took off was the packing nut..Which u should not have...If you want to continue fixing it your self...Listen carefully..:0

    You need to go to the store and buy the following things:

    1. You need the stems to replace the ones you have..When you pull the stem out it will say on the side of the,..ie..Gerber, Price FIster, Kohler, Sayco etc..

    2. To pull the stems out you will need the sockets for them..They sell them at your local Home Depot. It looks like a big set of Sockets

    3. You need to buy a set of Seat wrenches..This removes the circular brass piece behind the stem that the stems rest against.

    --If the the brand of stem you own is Gerber, Price Pister, or sayco..They make a nifty liitle kit that will come with everything u need in one package excluding the seat wrench. Usually around 40 dollars for the whole kit.

    This is a very tough job for a DIY-er..For gods sakes..Make sure you shut the water off before removing the stems..or you will get a un-needed shower.. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks very much, DawgFan!

      I got the message about being a DYIer {lol]. I really wish I had a choice, but I really have to give it a shot.

      BTW, I used a flashlight to get a better look at the stuff behind the tile. I didn't see any wording on anything, but I did see the "PP" symbol on the side of the nut shaped piece the "packing nut" [which I misnamed earlier] came out of.

      Anyway, I'm thinking that "PP" may stand for Price Pfister? What are your thoughts?

      Have a great on...

      Comment


      • #4
        Following up on these problems is what makes these forums useful, so here goes...

        **NOTE: My valves turned out to be stamped PP for Price Pfister, so this is all predicated on this make of valve.

        As you can read in the original post, my problem was that my shower "diverter" wasn't diverting.

        Here are the steps I took to correct this problem:

        -TURN OFF THE OUTSIDE WATER SUPPLY VALVE.

        -Remove the phillips screw in the center of the valve handle, and remove the chrome valve handle.

        -Pull off the decorative chrome escution that covers the valve stem.

        At this point, you should see the long valve stem protruding out of your shower wall/barrier [mine is ceramic tile]. For my Price Pfister valves, the stem is covered with a cylindrical teflon tube that is threaded on the outside.

        Unless it leaks, DO NOT remove the 29/32" brass packing nut that has been slid over the valve stem and threaded into the valve itself!

        -Using a 31/32" Shower Valve Socket [available at your Home Depot "box" store's PLUMBING AISLE], turn CCW to remove the shower valve assembly from the outer valve body [in your wall]. **NOTE: the socket described here is akin to those spark plug sockets commonly found in factory supplied motorcycle tool bags, so you will need a stout screwdriver shaft or the like to apply the required torque.

        -Using a 12" Crescent wrench or the like, hold the 31/32" hex "nut" in place [obviously, after removing the socket].

        -Slide the chrome valve handle back onto the valve stem splines, making sure it's securely seated.

        -While holding onto your Crescent wrench, turn the chrome valve handle CW until the valve stem/seat assembly comes completely out of the valve assembly.

        -Replace the white teflon "washer" that should be between the assembly you just removed and the rest of the valve [the part you're holding with your Crescent wrench].

        **NOTE: If, like me, your teflon washer has disintegrated [vanished], it might be a great idea to see one of these valves first. The one I looked at was fully assembled, which gave me a good idea where the washer's supposed to end up.

        -Carefully reverse the steps above, making appropriate changes such as "CW" becoming "CCW," and vice versa.

        TOTAL COST --> Under $10.00

        Thanks to DawgFan who "nudged" me off my perch. Although he was on the conservative side with his advice, I'd say this job can be done fairly easily be a DIYer IF YOU HAVE THE SOCKET.

        Hope this helps someone down the road...

        Comment


        • #5
          Sorry..I guess I could have been more specific...Pat yourself on the back..This is a hard task sometimes..Even to someone who does it for a living...Most of the time..the novice ones get stuck trying to get the handle off...THat takes a whole seperate tool..But it sounds like you were fortunate...I always like to help others..You saved yourself about a 400 dollar ssevice call..Congratulations...Chris

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Ram44maR:
            Following up on these problems is what makes these forums useful, so here goes...

            **NOTE: My valves turned out to be stamped PP for Price Pfister, so this is all predicated on this make of valve.

            As you can read in the original post, my problem was that my shower "diverter" wasn't diverting.

            Here are the steps I took to correct this problem:

            -TURN OFF THE OUTSIDE WATER SUPPLY VALVE.

            -Remove the phillips screw in the center of the valve handle, and remove the chrome valve handle.

            -Pull off the decorative chrome escution that covers the valve stem.

            At this point, you should see the long valve stem protruding out of your shower wall/barrier [mine is ceramic tile]. For my Price Pfister valves, the stem is covered with a cylindrical teflon tube that is threaded on the outside.

            Unless it leaks, DO NOT remove the 29/32" brass packing nut that has been slid over the valve stem and threaded into the valve itself!

            -Using a 31/32" Shower Valve Socket [available at your Home Depot "box" store's PLUMBING AISLE], turn CCW to remove the shower valve assembly from the outer valve body [in your wall]. **NOTE: the socket described here is akin to those spark plug sockets commonly found in factory supplied motorcycle tool bags, so you will need a stout screwdriver shaft or the like to apply the required torque.

            -Using a 12" Crescent wrench or the like, hold the 31/32" hex "nut" in place [obviously, after removing the socket].

            -Slide the chrome valve handle back onto the valve stem splines, making sure it's securely seated.

            -While holding onto your Crescent wrench, turn the chrome valve handle CW until the valve stem/seat assembly comes completely out of the valve assembly.

            -Replace the white teflon "washer" that should be between the assembly you just removed and the rest of the valve [the part you're holding with your Crescent wrench].

            **NOTE: If, like me, your teflon washer has disintegrated [vanished], it might be a great idea to see one of these valves first. The one I looked at was fully assembled, which gave me a good idea where the washer's supposed to end up.

            -Carefully reverse the steps above, making appropriate changes such as "CW" becoming "CCW," and vice versa.

            TOTAL COST --> Under $10.00

            Thanks to DawgFan who "nudged" me off my perch. Although he was on the conservative side with his advice, I'd say this job can be done fairly easily be a DIYer IF YOU HAVE THE SOCKET.

            Hope this helps someone down the road...

            Comment

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