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  • Replacing galv in a tight spot

    Hello, I hope someone can suggest a solution.

    I have four galvanized pipes running up an interior wall, which I opened to have a look at. They are from the 1920's. Two of the pipes on the right are cold water (hard and soft). The second from the left pipe is hot water (soft) and the pipe on far left is a hot water return (for hot water circulation).

    At least one of the hot water pipes is leaking (not visible down further below), and notice the weeping rust spots on the cold water pipe. I want to replace as much of all four of these pipes as feasible. There is decorative plaster above limiting my ability to tear out the entire wall above.

    The question is what is the best way to cut these (as high as I can manage) and attach copper or a better substitute? Notice that there is little room to thread these pipes for a fitting, and the two center pipes are against a stud, allowing no room for a compression fitting.

    Any suggestions?

    Thanks,
    Bert

  • #2
    why not just sleeve new pex lines in the wall and abandon the others in place? else use a sawzall to cut the top and bottom. slide it out from the bottom (under the first floor) and cut off sections until the pipes are removed.
    ~~

    ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

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    • #3
      Thanks, but there is an operating bathroom that these pipes connect to and I would still need to figure out how to connect pex to the existing bathroom piping, which is also galv. I don't want to tear the bathroom out yet, want to use the existing lines for a while longer, cutting out as much of the bad sections as I can. So, if possible, want to bring in pipes from below (which is basement) to hook up to these galv as high up as possible.

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      • #4
        pex does have threaded fittings...

        to connect pex direct to galv you would need to thread it. i doubt you have the space to do so.
        ~~

        ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

        Comment


        • #5
          You'll need to invest in some pipe wrenches in various angles and possibly some thread dies. You'll need to unscrew the damaged sections from the fittings and install threaded PEX adapters. If you damage more threads in the process, you'll be in a world of hurt. You could also try G couplings.

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          • #6
            Pay me now or pay me later. Look, its all galvy and it is all either leaking today or will be leaking in the near future. It all needs to go which is probably not a job for DIY. A competent plumber can replace all of it with minimum damage to the home. You can cut out those places you see, and you can string pex or run copper to replace those sections, but its only a matter of time before you have it leaking somewhere else.
            sigpic

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            • #7
              I will agree with NH here you may be able to replace the exposed pipes but most likely if some is leaking it is all near that same point,

              (I have a old galvanized water line very low pressure, running to a stock tank, the last year I used it, I had one leak, dug and fixed it, by the summer was over I had fixed three leaks and came to the conclusion, it need to be totally replaced, from one end to the other,

              even if you do cut and can unscrew it, and slip up new pipe in the wall and reconnect it, you have other pipe that most likely is not much better than what your looking at, with pex one can fish it much like romex wiring.

              about the only other thing is a dresser type coupling (a compression coupling) so you can replace a section if you can not thread,

              but I would leave it open for a few days and check that the compression couplings are not leaking, I would use them as a last resort,
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              • Bigcim
                Bigcim commented
                Editing a comment
                Can these be closed up in a wall?????

              • BHD
                BHD commented
                Editing a comment
                I do not know what the code says, there basically a super shark bite, but you can control the amount of squeeze one puts on the rubber gasket, I have never knowingly had one leak after install, but I do not use them often, and when I have they have been under ground in out side lines,

                I would not be afraid of using them. for a temporary repair in a wall, but would fix the problem ,meaning replace the line in it entirety. but I know it is just a mater of time before he has bigger problems and I would figure out some way of replace the line to the fixtures,
                I am doing much the same in my own house as I work on things I am removing the galvanized and putting in new lines, (my lines are not leaking yet).

              • hochwald
                hochwald commented
                Editing a comment
                Don't even have room for those where the pipe is right up against a stud, but thanks.

            • #8
              And cutting it usually involves a Sawzall which bounces the pipe around, which breaks loose the rust and causes more leaks.
              sigpic

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              • #9
                Originally posted by NHMaster3015 View Post
                And cutting it usually involves a Sawzall which bounces the pipe around, which breaks loose the rust and causes more leaks.
                and plugs everything downstream
                ~~

                ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

                Comment


                • #10
                  Originally posted by NHMaster3015 View Post
                  Pay me now or pay me later. Look, its all galvy and it is all either leaking today or will be leaking in the near future. It all needs to go which is probably not a job for DIY. A competent plumber can replace all of it with minimum damage to the home. You can cut out those places you see, and you can string pex or run copper to replace those sections, but its only a matter of time before you have it leaking somewhere else.
                  I agree, just trying to buy some time before the bathroom is redone, and when it's real easy to get at the pipes.

                  I have replaced approx 200 ft of galv in this house so far with copper, much of it was 1.25" galv as it enters the house (it's an old large home). Never had it in such a tight spot, with decorative plaster at the top (not visible in the pictures). Have experienced the headache of the sawzall and use a portable bandsaw when I can to keep vibration down.

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                  • #11
                    I'd investigate using a combination of MegaPress and Pex. Hopefully you could find a decent piece of galvy that would allow you to press on an adapter for a pex connection.

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