Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Water is pusly, tank rapidly clicks

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Water is pusly, tank rapidly clicks

    Hey guys,

    Love the site, been a guest for a while which helped me fix a few other issues. Anyway...

    We live in a mobile home with a well. We have a Goulds Water Tank V140 (Pretty sure that's the right now). After the last freeze happened (Maybe 2-3 weeks ago), we left the water running over night just to be safe. That's when the problems started.
    The tank will randomly click, repeatedly, about 8-10 times, then stop for about 15-20 minutes, and then start again. If we use the water, it'll click more often.
    The water also "pulsates". When doing dishes or filling up a glass of water, you can see the water go from normal flow to weaker and then normal flow again, all within seconds. If we're doing dishes for about 10 minutes, the water will stop, and then need to be shut off for about 5 minutes and we can continue with dishes.

    Washing laundry and taking a shower is impossible. With the washer on, it will fill up for about 30 seconds, then stop completely. About a minute later, it'll start for about 15 seconds. Now, if I stop the washer manually when I notice water get low, and turn it back on about 2 min later, it'll fill up for 30 seconds, and it repeats. The shower will run for 30 seconds, then stop completely and pretty much be like the washer.

    There is an dial next to the well that'll stop water from flowing through the rest of the house. When we have it shut off, there is no clicking (but also no water going through the house).

    I did notice water is leaking up towards the faucet in the bathroom sink at a pretty good rate. If I shut those valves off, same issue happens, but it leaks below the valves, so I see why it could still be happening.
    So my theory is, if I fix that leak, it should stop the annoying clicking/water issues. I'll let you guys know if that does fix it...

    Edit: I forgot to mention, the little dial on the front says 70 PSI. I assume that's high and bad.

    What do you guys think is going on? Could it be the tank or something worse?

    Thanks!
    Last edited by FirstTimer; 05-16-2014, 11:04 PM.

  • #2
    most likely your tank is water logged, or if the tank has a bladder it is damaged, if you do not get it fixed it will fry the pump most likely
    but I am guessing you have additional problems with the leaks,

    usually set 2 pounds below the kick in pressure,

    http://www.aces.edu/waterquality/faq...hp3?rowid=3141

    http://www.doh.wa.gov/Portals/1/Docu...bs/331-342.pdf
    Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
    attributed to Samuel Johnson
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks for your reply. How do I know if my tank has a bladder?

      Comment


      • #4
        If the tank has a bladder there will be a schrader valve (like the valve to put air in a tire) near the top of the tank.

        Comment


        • #5
          Just knowing the model # and name tells us it's a bladder tank and is a good sign that the tank is waterlogged. That tank is one of worst bladder tanks out there. Believe us, it's waterlogged. It will be extremely heavy also. If you push on the top as to rock it a little, it will take quite a bit of effort to get the apron off the ground. Don't push it far enough to break a pipe, but just enough to test how heavy it is. BHD is right, cycling a pump like that will smoke it in a hurry. When you buy your next tank, get either a Well X Trol, Flexcon (comes in several different model names) or a Zilmet. Absolutely stay away from big box stores. We change them out all the time. You might get around a year and a half out of those.
          Frequently asked questions about pumps and tanks.

          Comment


          • #6
            usually more by the looks of it, usually the bladder have a nice formed ends and more rounded, (the pictures of many tanks),

            and the standard units some are painted many are galvanized, but usually have the ends welded on at the cylinder, (picture show a standard galvanized tank,

            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

            regardless of type of tank, it needs some air in it so the water has some place to go, if it is water logged, full of water, it is like typing to pump into a solid pipe, water does not compress, so the only give you have is the on and off,



            on the bladder, shut off well, open up a faucet and add air until it is 2 lb less than the kick on pressure, the pressure should be on the pressure switch, 20-40 or 30-50. most likely a 30-50 put in 28 pounds, if air blows out the faucet then most likely your bladder is ruptured,

            even if the bladder is ruptured in your tank, if you want to keep using the well and not fry it, put some air in it, it will work some what, (not very well, but will work, get it fixed as soon as possible, if you do not want to replace the well pump,)

            on the standard turn off the pump, basically open up a faucet, put some air in until air comes out, shut off and air to about 20 lbs, and turn on well,

            yes when you turn it on air will blow out as well from what is in the pipes and excess in the tank, the problem with a standard tank is the air will be absorbed by the water over time, and will need to be replenished, to keep efficiency every few months, the standard tank my have some other items on it to help with the air volume in the tank, but ours never had any of those on it and we have had bladder tanks for at least thirty years on our system on the farm here,

            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


            some bladder tanks will last nearly for ever, and some only a few years,

            I have set up three tanks in our system, each with a shut off valve on them and a union, If I am having problems I can isolate the tank and if necessary remove it from the system, and not be down on water. (to check them all one needs to do is open up a faucet and time how long it takes between shut off and turn on, write that down, (I forget), and every 6 months turn it on and time it, and see if it is cycling any faster, if it is most likely you have some problem, the larger the tank the longer the pump runs and more time between cycling, the longer the pump/motor life,


            Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
            attributed to Samuel Johnson
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

            Comment


            • #7
              Pressure switch inlet clogged
              sigpic

              Comment

              Working...
              X