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  • threaded joints for steam

    our company is about to install some HP steam piping and I'm worried about leaks. Is it a good idea to use teflon tape with the pipe dope? Also what is the best thread sealant for steam?

  • #2
    If in fact you are Countrywide Mechanical Systems Inc. out of El Cajon you appear to be an unlicensed HVAC Contractor. This of course limits your total contract to under $500 and I would advise on passing this project up.

    If you are not Countrywide Mechanical Systems Inc. and/or you are licensed maybe you could provide a little more information regarding what you are trying to do.

    [ 07-30-2005, 07:24 PM: Message edited by: ToUtahNow ]
    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by rjs54:
      our company is about to install some HP steam piping and I'm worried about leaks. Is it a good idea to use teflon tape with the pipe dope? Also what is the best thread sealant for steam?
      If it is "high pressure" I would highly advize having someone framiliar with the appropriate ASME standards on power piping (which I believe is B3.1), do or supervise the installation. "High pressure" systems can be dangerous if not properly installed, and the ASME standards are numerous regarding material and installation, depending on size, tempreture, and pressure.

      You will have to calculate expantion loops, and depending on the size and tempreture may have to hang it on rollers to allow movement when the pipe expands.

      Again, all this depends on the system. If it is an engineered system follow the specs. and drawings closly. If is not, you really need to get an expert on board.

      I don't consider myself an expert on high pressure steam, so I don't want to give you alot of specific information.
      the dog

      Comment


      • #4
        rjs54,

        When you say, "our company", do you mean the company you work for is doing the work to install the system or the company you work for is hiring someone to install the system?

        No offense, but if the company you work for is actually going to do the install then I really hope those in charge already know what kind of chemicals and compounds they intend to supply their workers. If they do not know what to use then I want to make a strong suggestion to you. START LOOKING FOR A SAFER PLACE TO WORK.

        Three men were horribly burned in an industrial HP steam accident two years ago at a mill very familiar to me. One of them died a few months later after lingering in extreme pain another is permenantly disabled and disfigured.. the man who died was the one who went back in to save his buddies.

        Like Plumdog10 said, "make sure to have an expert on board".

        If by "your comapny", you mean your employer is hiring another outfit to install a HP steam system then all they really need to do is to be sure the mechanical contractor is UA affilliated. Then you will be getting steamfitters who have had the best training available on the planet and they will have the proper material and compounds to install an efficient and safe system for you.

        rjs54,
        If you yourself are the contractor, please, for the saftey of all involved, consult with your suppliers and your equipment specifications for information on things of importance. Helping a do it yourselfer or beginner try to repair a toilet,potable water pipe or low pressure gas line via an annoymous internet site is one thing, HP steam is quite another.
        Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

        Comment


        • #5
          It appears that Rick (rjs54) is with an outfit known as Countywide Mechanical Systems from El Cajon, CA. If that's the case I suggest you sub out the steam work before someone gets hurt, like one of your employees (you win a big OSHA fine) or the client (your prize could be a big lawsuit) that puts you out of business.

          B31.1 is the Power Piping code.
          B31.3 is Chemical Plant & Petroleum Refinery process piping.
          B31.5 is refrigeration piping.
          B31.8 covers gas transmission and distribution.

          B31.1 covers boiler external piping for power boilers and high temperature, high pressure water boilers in which steam or vapor is generated at a pressure of more than 15 PSIG, or high temperature water is generated at pressures exceeding 160 PSIG and/or temperatures exceeding 250 degrees F.

          Comment


          • #6
            Bob D.,

            Good post. I have to ask why someone who works with a commercial boiler company has to ask an internet BBS about pipe joint compounds? It does not speak well for his company. Either he is not getting the proper training or he does not trust his foremen to give him accurate information.

            I guess the another possibility would be that he is testing the knowledge of the other posters on this forum. Bob can I ask how you came to know about rjs54's employment?
            Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Bob D.:
              It appears that Rick (rjs54) is with an outfit known as Countywide Mechanical Systems from El Cajon, CA. If that's the case I suggest you sub out the steam work before someone gets hurt, like one of your employees (you win a big OSHA fine) or the client (your prize could be a big lawsuit) that puts you out of business.

              B31.1 is the Power Piping code.
              B31.3 is Chemical Plant & Petroleum Refinery process piping.
              B31.5 is refrigeration piping.
              B31.8 covers gas transmission and distribution.

              B31.1 covers boiler external piping for power boilers and high temperature, high pressure water boilers in which steam or vapor is generated at a pressure of more than 15 PSIG, or high temperature water is generated at pressures exceeding 160 PSIG and/or temperatures exceeding 250 degrees F.
              Bob D.,

              Are you a steam fitter? If so it would be great to have a person with that specialization on this forum.

              the dog
              the dog

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by ToUtahNow:
                If in fact you are Countrywide Mechanical Systems Inc. out of El Cajon you appear to be an unlicensed HVAC Contractor. This of course limits your total contract to under $500 and I would advise on passing this project up.

                If you are not Countrywide Mechanical Systems Inc. and/or you are licensed maybe you could provide a little more information regarding what you are trying to do.
                Utah,

                According to the CSLB website, Countywide Mechanical Systems Inc. are licensed. They are listed as "current" and "active".
                the dog

                Comment

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