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  • Cleanout replacement

    I'm going to be doing a cleanout replacement in the near future and i wanted your guys opinions on it. It's a 3" stack with a c/o about 8" off the floor. Cast iron all the way. There is a hub at the floor and the c/o tee goes straight into that. There is no room to cut the c/o off at the bottom and attach a no hub band so it will have to be removed from the hub. I was planning on cutting the pipe above the c/o and then removing it from the hub with a chisel and other assorted tools. When installing the new c/o i intend to use a no-hub at the top and a pvc spigot fitting at the bottom into the hub. Then i intend to pack it with oakum and do one of two things. This is where my question comes in: Pour a lead joint or use the (i don't know the proper name for the stuff, but) tube that goes in the caulking gun that is for this application. I have only poured lead joints in the past and it would save both time and money if i could use the caulk stuff. 1) What is the name of the caulk stuff? 2) is it any good?

  • #2
    3) is the caulk code?

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    • #3
      Theron,

      If you melt lead to pour into the hub you will ruin the PVC. Go to the supply house and ask for shredded lead. It will look like steel wool but it is lead. After you have packed your oakum start shoving the lead on top. You'll need hammer it in with your caulking iron in layers so it will take some time but it beats melting or distorting your PVC spigot fitting.

      Mark

      [ 11-04-2005, 12:53 AM: Message edited by: ToUtahNow ]
      "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

      I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

      Comment


      • #4
        I've seen that stuff. Do you finish it just like you would a lead joint? Sounds a little less messy than caulk. Is it cheap or expensive?

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        • #5
          You treat it just like melted lead. It is not too pricey but it is more per pound than regular lead.

          Mark
          "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

          I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

          Comment


          • #6
            That's probably what i'll end up doing, but i'm still curious if the caulk is any good. I've heard other people in the shop talking about it; i want to know if i should be for or against people using it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Theron,

              I think in Ohio you are using the IPC. Check section 705.5.1 in the IPC. Per the IPC you can use poured lead, acidproof cement or acid-resistant rope. All of them need to be listed for caulked fittings to be legal. If they are listed the containers will have the testing companies label on it.

              Mark
              "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

              I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

              Comment


              • #8
                Theron,

                By the way, one of the most important tools on your truck should be your Code book. A good knowledge of the code is what separates a plumber from a guy just collecting a check.

                Mark
                "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                Comment


                • #9
                  theron, why not use a no hub test tee. this way you can pour a lead joint and not have to buy lead wool. i have lead wool in the truck, but in this case a poured joint would be easy, faster and less expensive than the cost and time of lead wool. plus a hot lead joint will be much easier to pack than the lead wool.

                  good luck. rick.

                  ps, you can read all of dangoo8 post in his profile. click on his name to see. i felt he was a joke after the first private message he sent me.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The code book is the most important tool, however, I only have the Kentucky book not ohio or indiana. Kentucky is more strict than both of them anyway. I could do the no hub tee and the lead joint. The thing is i always have to borrow all the lead joint stuff from the shop, I've never owned those tools yet. I may have poured a total of 6 lead joints (all vertical) thus far. I will end up having to use two no hub couplings and a short piece of pipe on top of the tee because of the length of the repair piece. I won't be able to slip the pipe in the hub and then slide it under the stack, it will be too long. I'll have to install my tee and then slide in the short piece between two no hubs. I say short, I'll probably make it a foot long so it doesn't look goofy. Or i could put the short piece under the c/o and slide the c/o tee in between the no hubs - that would probably look best and make it easy to replace the c/o in the future. I'm rambling [img]smile.gif[/img]

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                    • #11
                      I found dangs other post with the business proposition. wow - what a doofus. I get the impression he's not from this continent originally. Even here in Can-tucky we don't talk that bad. He's young because he uses all them teeny bopper abbreviations in his post (ur, plz, 2 instead of to, etc.), i assume this is his idea of a childish prank.

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                      • #12
                        Theron,

                        Sorry your profile says Cincinnati, Ohio so I assumed that was correct. My son lives in Kentucky but is visiting in Iraq right now.

                        Anyways as a heads up to you, Kentucky uses the International Plumbing Code (IPC) and then does amendments through what is called the Kentucky Revised Statutes (KRS). The only amendment in the KRS for the plumbing code has to do with anchorage of water heaters.

                        Now once you get to Indiana you go to the Uniform Plumbing Code (UPC). However the UPC is much tougher than the IPC.

                        It likely will not matter soon as it looks like the UPC and IPC will merge within the next few years. The IPC is all for the merge but most UPC guys don't like the less restrictive IPC so changes are being made to both.

                        Mark
                        "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                        I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          My method would be to remove the fitting by breaking it with a hammer and removing the lead with a lead pick ( if you don't have it, use a drill to make holes in the lead all the way around, and use a small chisil to remove the lead). Then lead in a short piece of no-hub with either wool or poured lead, and go from there.

                          Measure wether you can make a no-hub joint work before you do this. You're post indicated that you have no room to cut the pipe and use a no-hub band. For a 4" band you need about 2-1/2". If you have that kind of space, use a grinder with a good cutting wheel to cut off the pipe where you need, a snap or ratchet cutter are not your only option.

                          If you have the room, leave the exising clean-out in place, cap it off, and cut in a new one.

                          Just some suggestions that may help,

                          the dog
                          the dog

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                          • #14
                            To cut in a new 4" band it requires about 2 1/2" on each side.


                            Making it clear,

                            the dog
                            the dog

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