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  • SEWAGE SEEPING?

    I have what appears to be sewage seeping from my soil stack. let me see if i can describe the problem. i have a vertical main sewage pipe. has several tie in's in by basement. has 2 horizontal pipes going into the vertical one. one of those vertical pipes has sewage seeping at the union. 2 toilets, showers and bathroom sinks feed this pipe. i am a meidocre do it yourself plumber. is this something i should call a pro for or is this an easy fix?

    ed
    \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

  • #2
    ed,
    What type of pipe do you have, cast iron, pvc, abs, copper?
    Dave
    Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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    • #3
      Do yourself, your family, your neighborhood, your coworkers, your hospital emergency room and America in general, a good turn and call a professional plumber. Besides, it is illegal to open the sanitary sewer system unless you are a registered master plumber or are employed by and working under the supervision of one. These laws were enacted years ago, to protect the health of the public. Raw sewage is nasty stuff and the lack of proper containment of it has caused the outbreak of disease epidemics thruout history. And I ain't bein' overly dramatic here.
      Remember, "If you do it yourself, you only have yourself to blame..."

      Now tell me, if you had a hemorroid, would you remove it yerself? Even if you could get the tools at the local pharmacy and the procedure how to do it on the internet?. How much would you save?

      --------------FfP
      Registered Master Plumber #4354
      City of Philadelphia

      Comment


      • #4
        Dave

        it is cast iron.

        ed
        \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

        Comment


        • #5
          Figures , of all the pipes I listed, this will be the hardest to work with.

          CI pipe usually is snapped(special tool) not cut but can be cut with a good quality metal cutting blade and recipricating saw. I would cut-out the leaking joint then replace the cut-out section with a piece of PVC or ABS plastic pipe using a couple of flexible rubber coupling or no-hub couplings.

          Depending how old your house is, there should be riser clamps installed to prevent the piping system from falling when you cut-out the leaking joint. Just to be sure though, I'd recommend that you shore up the horizontal piping that leads into the vertical stack.

          You can make this repair yourself but its a borderline "call a pro" job.

          Dave
          Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

          Comment


          • #6
            the problem i see it that the "joint" is where the horizontal pipe feeds into a "t" on the vertcal main line. so it would almost seem like i should cut out the whole "t" and replace everyhing with pvc?
            \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

            Comment


            • #7
              Sorry, I guess I didn't understand your original post, I thought the problem was in the stack. I agree with you, replace the fitting also. One thing though, if the current fitting is a Tee, I would replace it with a Wye fitting and a Street 45° elbow.
              Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

              Comment


              • #8
                That sounds like a plan. the problem is in the stack. the stack has t "t" at the top of it where my seeping pipe feeds into it
                \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

                Comment


                • #9
                  the ty and 45 may not be up to code, in an old house like that the cast iron stack is probably doubling as a vent. he goes your route and he risks pushing up waste out from lower fixtures.
                  If it's at the fitting you really ought to consider calling a pro, think about what you may have to go without if you get stuck.
                  fyi Lee Valley has some stuff called ray crete, I think the number is cl130 thats about as far as I suggest you take this before you call someone.

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                  • #10
                    It may be illegal in Philly but in most of the country the homeowner can work on his system. Cast iron joints were made by stuffing oakum (oil impregnated jute, I believe) and pouring molten lead in to seal it. I think it is accepted practice to take a punch or dull chisel and gently tighten the lead which usually fixes the problem.

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                    • #11
                      Well i called someone after finding out this was covered under my home warranty. plumber came out and did exactly what the last post said..."repacked" the lead with a chisel and then sealed it with a clear silicone. he then showed me exactly what to do if the leak redevelopes (said no reason i should have to call him), including what to use to get around the need for molten lead. thanks for all the tips as well as learning not to move to philly
                      \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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