Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Vise Selection

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Vise Selection

    I'm about to start a project where I'll need to hand-thread some ridgid conduit -- 3/4", 1 1/4" and 1 1/2". I've already got a good hand threader and pipe cutter, but I'm going to need some variety of pipe vise for this work. I've been waffling between getting a used 40-A Tristand and putting a good yoke vise on a winch plate that I can put in the hitch receiver on my truck (GMC Sierra). One factor is that much of this work will be out in the middle of an open field (a three-tower AM Radio Station transmitter site) where the tristand might not be the best idea... hard to get good leverage when the legs aren't on a solid surface. I do have a good work area at the transmitter building where I could use a Tristand very nicely (concrete floor), but that would make for a lot of running back and forth at times, and a lot of time wasted.

    So, I'm thinking about the truck-mounted vise. Anyone here had experience with this? Possible problems I haven't thought of yet? Some other alternative? I'd like to learn from YOUR experience instead of MINE

    Or, should I just get a tristand?

    Thanks!

    D.

  • #2
    dan, i too have a tristand and a mount for the 2'' trailer reciever on my truck. honestly the truck mount is the way to go in an isolated area. as long the vice will rotate to the proper orientation and not cause the pipe to impead traffic, you're fine. i guess in a field there is no issue with cross traffic. if a hitch can support a 500# tounge weight and tow 6000# don't think that a piece of 3/4'' pipe will flip the truck. as stated in your other post, watch out for the torque of the threader (ridgid 600). these come with a support arm which is actually a vice that will allow you to thread in place without a vice to support the pipe or torque.
    i'll be doing a similar project today on a rooftop with 3/4'' gal.
    out of curiosity what is 3/4'' gal costing you there. i got a quote today from .86 cents and one for $ 1.11 a foot. both supply houses are usually very competative.

    be careful.
    rick.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK:
      dan, i too have a tristand and a mount for the 2'' trailer reciever on my truck. honestly the truck mount is the way to go in an isolated area. as long the vice will rotate to the proper orientation and not cause the pipe to impead traffic, you're fine. i guess in a field there is no issue with cross traffic. if a hitch can support a 500# tounge weight and tow 6000# don't think that a piece of 3/4'' pipe will flip the truck. as stated in your other post, watch out for the torque of the threader (ridgid 600). these come with a support arm which is actually a vice that will allow you to thread in place without a vice to support the pipe or torque.
      i'll be doing a similar project today on a rooftop with 3/4'' gal.
      out of curiosity what is 3/4'' gal costing you there. i got a quote today from .86 cents and one for $ 1.11 a foot. both supply houses are usually very competative.

      be careful.
      rick.
      Rick, I'm working with galvanized rigid conduit, which is of course different from galvanized pipe (doesn't have to pass pressure test, and I think is a little lighter wall). I was just quoted $113.40 per hundred for 1500 ft of 3/4" rigid. I has a second bid that was higher and ended up in the shredder. That price included delivery to the site.

      I don't have to worry about threader torque, since I'm going to be using a manual drop-head threader. I'd prefer a power threader, of course, but I don't do enough to justify the cost.

      The only indecision I have now is the choice of a vise for the truck mount. Part of me wants to mount a Ridgid 22 yoke vise, and part of me wants to use a combination vise so it can be used for other things, too. Problem is that I've seen more than one combo vise that did a lousy job of holding pipe, particularly after some use.

      What do you use on your truck mount?

      D.

      Comment


      • #4
        dan i use both a ridgid yoke vice that clamps onto my step bumper like a c clamp. and a chain vice that slides into my trailer hitch that i made. it will rotate and elevate. basically it's mounted onto a 2'' square tube as follows.
        2'' horizontal 1'6'' horizontal that slides into bumper reciever. a vertical 6'' 2'' i.d. tube that allows the vice to slide into the vertical. then the vice is mounted to a steel plate with a 2'' od. vertical tube. the tubes have a 5/8'' hole to allow for a pin to anchor the vice to the proper height. with this configuration i can raise the vice and also rotate at 90 degree intervals.
        with this much threading you should get an electric threader. the main difference with the pipe threads is plumbing usesa tapered thread and electrical uses a straight thread. also you might be buying a thinner imc pipe.seamless pipe for pulling wires. good for above ground work. lousy for underground. rust out too fast.
        the 3/4'' gal. that was at the plumbing supply house was made in the phillipeens. .86 cents a foot. good for adove ground gas. never would use for water.
        i would also invest in a portaband to cut the pipe. very little reaming needed. didn't know you can use a pipe cutter on electrical. the electricians i've worked with here always use a hack saw of sort. once again the burr from the cutter is not allowed for electrical.
        hand threading 1.5'' pipe. better eat your spinich.

        rick.

        Comment


        • #5
          Rick, threaded rigid and IMC conduit uses standard NPT threads. In fact, electricians have been known to use an occasional plumbing fitting to get by in a pinch. Electricians usually prefer to use EMT (thinwall Electrical Metalic Tubing)because it's cheap, easy, and doesn't have to be threaded. It cuts easily with a hacksaw, and if the end isn't cut squarely it still works fine as long as the ends are deburred. When I do EMT work I usually cut it with an abrasive chopsaw and debur with a handheld angle grinder (outside edge) and a handheld deburring tool (inside edge). Fast and easy. In fact, I'd use EMT for this job were it not for some factors with the location -- a 50,000 watt AM radio station. Even with compression couplings, I'd have to bond every joint to insure ground continuity, and since it's abopve ground I have to bond it to the station ground every 20 feet or so. A threaded piping system makes a lot of sense in that environment.

          Fortunately, I won't have to do that much threading on the 1 1/2 and 1 1/4 -- straight runs of about 500' with pull boxes every 100' or so -- supported by existing wooden poles conveniently spaced about 10 feet apart. The 3/4 is also mostly straight shots -- straight UP. Tower (obstruction) lights. A few more cuts, a few odd length nipples. The 1 1/2 and 1 1/4 are IMC, the 3/4 is rigid.

          As far as vises are concerned, I'm considering picking up a Ridgid F series combination vise for the receiver mount. Should give me a little more utility.

          I never use metal conduit underground... I've had to replace too much of it. It's become a common practice to use PVC underground with rigid risers on each end -- or just direct-burial cable with rigid risers.

          Enjoy!

          D.

          Comment


          • #6
            Dan,

            This is a bit off your original thread topic but what kind of luck have you had with the direct burial wire. I would like to run a new hundred amp service down to my automobile garage below the hill from my house. As I have a lot of time and money invested in my beautiful lawn I would like to just pull the line with a vibratory plow using conduit risers only at both buildings and down one retaining wall.. Do you feel this is a safe method or would you reccomend another course.

            Thanks,
            Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by plumber:
              Dan,

              This is a bit off your original thread topic but what kind of luck have you had with the direct burial wire. I would like to run a new hundred amp service down to my automobile garage below the hill from my house. As I have a lot of time and money invested in my beautiful lawn I would like to just pull the line with a vibratory plow using conduit risers only at both buildings and down one retaining wall.. Do you feel this is a safe method or would you reccomend another course.

              Thanks,
              The vibratory plow won't get the wire as deep as it needs to be to meet code. Check your local codes on this... I don't have my code book at hand, but 24" seems to stick in my brain. Youanso have to be sure you're using a cable that's suitable for use with a vibratory plow -- just because it's rated for direct burial doesn't mean it is. Soil type is a consideration as well.

              Where I have a choice, I'll always run cable in PVC conduit rather than direct burial. In the long run, the conductors are better protected. I've seen jobs where they peeled back the sod and dug a narrow tranch with a backhoe, dropping the dirt in a dump truck. After the conduit is in place, backfill the same way and roll the sod back into place. Even if you peel back the sod and use a Ditch Witch (leaving the removed soil alongside the trench), after you backfill and replace tyhe sod it won't take that long before it's back to pre-trench condition.

              Or, route the conduit through your neighbor's yard.

              Enjoy.

              D.

              Comment

              Working...
              X