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Detecting Gas Leaks

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  • Detecting Gas Leaks

    I have the ridgid cd-100 leak detector. I install a lot of 3/4" gas pipe. With that said the gas company pressure tests to 20 psi. Operating pressure is 9-10 psi. County Gas was kind enough to pressurize the lines with gas for me instead of pressured air. So my question is. Do I need to fill the lines with 10 psi of gas and 10 psi of air to get the required 20psi? Also any tips for my leak detector would be appreciated.

  • #2
    you need 20 psi of air with a tracer gas that the cd-100 can detect. so, any one of these:

    Originally posted by Ridgid
    Methane, Hydrogen, Propane, Ethylene, Ethane, Hexane, Iso-Butane, Benzene, Iso-Butane, Ethanol, Acetaldehyde, Toluene, P-Xylene, Ammonia, Hydrogen Sulfide.
    *Common mixtures that would include or emit more than one of these gases include natural gas, paint thinners, industrial solvents, dry cleaning fluids, and gasoline
    I'd use 2 lb propane containers with an unlit torch head to inject my trace gas.
    ~~

    ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

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    • #3
      So 10 psi NG and 10 psi air would work?

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      • #4
        yes it would.
        ~~

        ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

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        • #5
          i would toss the detector and get a manometer along with a soap bottle. sniffing for a test is a waste of time. soap is cheap and doesn't require you to spend a lot of time at each joint.

          The manometer will tell you very quickly if there is a leak or it's tight.

          Rick.
          phoebe it is

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          • #6
            I have a TIF leak detector and while it can be useful it has a tendency to create false alarms - the vapors in joint compound for example can trigger the detector and give the impression of a leak when there is actually no leak.

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            • #7
              we have to isolate the new piping from the gas meter . test with air t0 1 1/2 times the working pressure . Usually even if the system is a 1/2 lb system I will pump up my 8 psi gauge to 7lbs. If the gauge drops I break out the soup bubbles .
              ''Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" Benjamin Franklin

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              • #8
                True, but pressurized water is much safer than compressed air. Especially at that pressure.

                We use air when testing waste lines over sensitive areas or multi story buildings. 5 psi air is much safer than 4+ Stories of water. That could end up being 16+ psi at the lowest level of the stack.

                Rick.
                phoebe it is

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