Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Sump Pump

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Sump Pump

    Sump Pump only turns on when intake pipes in the pit are almost 3/4" full. Pump runs longer, but turns on less. This is a good thing. Right.

  • #2
    i prefer the bed under the floor to be dry
    ~~

    ... it was plumbed by Ray Charles and his helper Stevie Wonder

    Comment


    • fixitright
      fixitright commented
      Editing a comment
      Remember when Water Beds were the big thing?

      Just get her rolling and ride the wave.

  • #3
    We occasionally have to rely on a sump for a system drain. Sometimes we have clear out debris from the pit when we're testing a system that might be in a parking garage.

    Most of the configurations I've seen have a 2 pump arrangement with the first pump doing half the pit and the second pump operating at about 3/4 full and a high water alarm a few inches about that. The high water alarm can be a local alarm or send the alarm back to engineering or security.

    Some buildings however only have one pump and no high water alarm. As I understand it you don't want the pump cycling at the first drop of water. For instance having the pump run within a a foot of filling would make the sump less full but constantly cycle the pump and therefore increase the wear and tear on it.

    In your situation is say the pump running at 3/4 full is ideal.

    Comment


    • #4
      Originally posted by BigD3129 View Post
      Sump Pump only turns on when intake pipes in the pit are almost 3/4" full. Pump runs longer, but turns on less. This is a good thing. Right.
      Had to read it again to verify the question.

      You really don't want the intake pipes submerged before the pump kicks on. Problem is it will keep debris in the pipe and not necessarily clear it out.

      The pump either needs to be lowered, or the float needs to be adjusted to turn on sooner.

      Short cycling is bad for a pump. Typically width of a pit is better for volume than depth.

      If your pump has a built in float that has an arm, you might be in trouble to try and adjust the pump cycles. With a teather type of cord, much simpler to adjust the pump cycle curve.

      Rick.
      phoebe it is

      Comment

      Working...
      X