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  • Cutting Oil

    Has anyone used the new Ridgid Water Washable cutting oil? What did you think?

    I haven't seen it in stock anywhere, and wanted to check before I ordered it.
    the dog

  • #2
    I still have 4 or 5 5-gallon containers of cutting oil left from when I sold my business so I doubt I will be buying oil anytime soon.

    If Ridgid has a water soluble oil I would like to hear how it stands up to the old oil. Is the oil for limited use or can you use it for hand or power threading and for any size pipes?

    Mark
    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

    Comment


    • #3
      Don't know. There isn't much in the way of details on this website.

      I know one thing, even if it's a few bucks more, it worth it to me. I don't think I've ever done a threading project where I didn't get chewed out for spilling or dripping oil on some finised surface.

      I just have doubts about how effective it could be.

      the dog
      the dog

      Comment


      • #4
        plumbdog10,

        After looking at the Ridgid site it is almost like they don't want to sell it. What I was able to learn is it is a synthetic oil. Everything I have seen with synthetic oil so far is pretrty possive.

        I know a lot of expencsive lathes use synthetic oil now. We've also started using it in our motorcycles which has doubled the time between changes. I think you'd be safe using it and save some clothes at the same time.

        Mark
        "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

        I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

        Comment


        • #5
          THE THREADING OIL IN MY RIDGID 1210 IS ACTUALLY A COOLANT. THIS IS A DIFFERENT TYPE THAN WHAT YOU GUYS ARE DISCUSSING, BUT I THOUGHT I WOULD SHARE MY 2 CENTS. I CAN WRITE THIS OFF NOW.

          RICK

          Comment


          • #6
            Guys,
            We launched the water washable oil a few years ago in an attempt to broaden our offering in the oil line. The main feature of this oil is that it cleans up easily with water. (Clothes, tooling, piping, floors, concrete etc.) If it is allowed to set up for a while you may need to scrub with a broom or brush but it will come up.
            The oil is biodegradable and contains no chlorine, halogens, PCB's or heavy metals.

            I checked with the guys who did the initial testing on this new oil in 99 before we released it and it performed on the same level as the dark oil. As far as hand threading it could be used there as well.
            From my own experience here in the training center I notice that the oil has a different odor than traditional oils and it tends to smoke a little more. I do not notice a big drop off in thread quality, I still think the stainless is the best quality but I have no problems with the water washable.
            I hope that sheds some light on the water washable, however I would still like to hear from the guys who may use this every day in the field as this is the true test for any oil or product.
            Thanks,
            Adam

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Adam:
              Guys,
              We launched the water washable oil a few years ago in an attempt to broaden our offering in the oil line. The main feature of this oil is that it cleans up easily with water. (Clothes, tooling, piping, floors, concrete etc.) If it is allowed to set up for a while you may need to scrub with a broom or brush but it will come up.
              The oil is biodegradable and contains no chlorine, halogens, PCB's or heavy metals.

              I checked with the guys who did the initial testing on this new oil in 99 before we released it and it performed on the same level as the dark oil. As far as hand threading it could be used there as well.
              From my own experience here in the training center I notice that the oil has a different odor than traditional oils and it tends to smoke a little more. I do not notice a big drop off in thread quality, I still think the stainless is the best quality but I have no problems with the water washable.
              I hope that sheds some light on the water washable, however I would still like to hear from the guys who may use this every day in the field as this is the true test for any oil or product.
              Thanks,
              Adam
              If it's smoking it doesn't sound like its performing too well. That might be a little hard on the dies, which are getting expensive.

              the dog
              the dog

              Comment


              • #8
                Rick,

                I assume you are using one of those "oiless" threaders. How does that perform?

                the dog
                the dog

                Comment


                • #9
                  i do weld fab as part of my buss. i have an auto band saw that uses water sol. coolent. to cut steel. it works fine, never a problem. i believe threading 2" or larger pipe generates more heat than my 7" x 12" band saw
                  I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    DOG, YOU'RE RIGHT. IT'S A RIDGID #1210. 1/2''- 1''. IT USES A SMALL DROP OF COOLANT TO KEEP THE DIES COOL. NOW THAT'S COOL. THE MACHINE IS LIGHT AND VERY PORTABLE. A 10' STICK IS ABOUT ALL I WOULD DO WITHOUT PLENTY OF SUPPORT ON THE PIPE.
                    THE NICE THING IS WHEN YOU'RE DONE THREADING, THE PIPE IS CLEAN AND COOL. NO DRIPS, NO SPILLS, NO ERRORS.WHOOPS WRONG ADVERTISEMENT. BUT SAME RESULTS.

                    PS. THAT WAS THE OLD JOHNNY BENCH , KRYLON PAINT COMMERCIAL. JUST THOUGHT I WOULD THROW THAT IN.

                    RICK.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK:
                      DOG, YOU'RE RIGHT. IT'S A RIDGID #1210. 1/2''- 1''. IT USES A SMALL DROP OF COOLANT TO KEEP THE DIES COOL. NOW THAT'S COOL. THE MACHINE IS LIGHT AND VERY PORTABLE. A 10' STICK IS ABOUT ALL I WOULD DO WITHOUT PLENTY OF SUPPORT ON THE PIPE.
                      THE NICE THING IS WHEN YOU'RE DONE THREADING, THE PIPE IS CLEAN AND COOL. NO DRIPS, NO SPILLS, NO ERRORS.WHOOPS WRONG ADVERTISEMENT. BUT SAME RESULTS.

                      PS. THAT WAS THE OLD JOHNNY BENCH , KRYLON PAINT COMMERCIAL. JUST THOUGHT I WOULD THROW THAT IN.

                      RICK.
                      Rick,

                      I knew it, I knew it (quote from Barney Fife). What my concern about these threaders is the life expectancy of the dies. Normal Ridgid dies are pretty expensive anymore. The so-called "Gold Dies" they use on that oiless threader must be even more expensive. My question is how long do they last? This system is great for clean rooms, or occasional use, but I work heavy in industrial piping, where I can have a machine working like mad for eight hours a day. If the oil and dies don't hold-up, that can add alot of money to a job.

                      the dog
                      the dog

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        DOG, SO FAR THE ORIGINAL SET OF DIES, 1/2''-3/4'' AND THE 1'' ARE DOING FINE. GRANTED IT DOESN'T GET THE USE LIKE YOU'RE DESCRIBING. BUT IF YOU DON'T ABUSE THE MACHINE IT WILL TREAT YOU RIGHT. THE MAIN THING I FIND WITH THESE TYPE OF TOOLS, IS OPERATOR ERROR. IF THE PERSON RUNNING THE MACHINE WAS ALSO THE PERSON WHO PAID FOR THE MACHINE, THE TOOLS WOULD LAST LONGER. EXPERIENCE IS WAY UP THERE TOO. I WOULDN'T CONSIDER THIS MACHINE A HIGH END PRODUCTION MACHINE. A COLLINS/ ROTHENBERER, 22A IS MY REAL WORKHORSE. PROBLEM IS YOU NEED A HORSE AND A MULE TO CARRY IT ANYWHERE. THE 1210 IS LIKE A LARGE LUNCHBOX. ONCE AGAIN LIMITED USE TO 1/2''- 1''. FULL LENGTHS ARE TUFF ON THE MOTOR AND IT NEEDS GOOD SUPPORT.

                        ALSO I FOUND 2 BRAND NEW COMPLETE SETS OF DIES ON EBAY FOR A VERY GOOD PRICE. AND YES I DID RECIEVE THEM VERY QUICK.

                        WHY NOT GET A REP TO DEMO 1 FOR YOU. I BET IF YOU DON'T BITE, THEY WILL LET YOU KEEP IT FOR THE DAY.

                        RICK

                        [ 08-19-2005, 12:02 AM: Message edited by: PLUMBER RICK ]

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Rick,

                          I too like the Collins (now Rothenburger) machines. I thought the Thread-o-Matics were the fastest and easist to use. I think the jaws were better than Ridgid. But, I always thought the Ridgid dies and die heads were better. In a perfect world they would merge the two machines.

                          I know those Collins macines are monsters, I'll write about it later I gotta go.

                          the dog
                          the dog

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I've always used the number 2 dark oil, it works well and the dies last a long time with it. I have disparaged the cordless tools that bear Rigids name but the pipe heads and dies by Rigid are without equal, in my humble opinion anyway. I did a lot of stainless steel pipe at a milk processor not too long ago and used a different oil, it was clear but am not sure of the number or even the brand anymore. The processing company provided all of the pipe compounds and oil.

                            On another recent stainless job, this time a powdered beverage plant, I used number 2 dark cutting oil, teflon tape and Megaloc pipe dope on the potable water. The plant then used a combination of 200 degree water and some type of acid to purify the interior of the pipe. The fitters used rolled groove pipe and sterilized with very hot water and acid as well.

                            Never really given a lot of thought to cutting oil because the old stand bys have always worked so well. Which is a testament to Ridgids commitments to quality. Just wish I knew why they sold out their name to the communist Chinese.
                            Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Plumber,

                              Dark oil rules. [img]smile.gif[/img]

                              Couldn't agree more with your assesment.

                              the dog


                              ps. What I've always hated about stainless threaded pipe is that is tightens, then stops. It's kind of a ***** to line up your elbows. It just dosen't have the play of iron pipe.
                              the dog

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