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  • Tee Puller

    I have a customer who needs a tool to pull or draw a 3/4" fitting out of installed 2" copper tubing. He has used one in the past that is hand operated. I would appreciate any help with the correct name of the tool and possibly a manufacturer. Thanks

  • #2
    the electric version is called a "tee-drill".
    i have 4 of them and could sell 1 to you. there are 2 different sized machines. the smaller 1 is designed for 1''- 2'' pipe with a tee of 1/2'' - 1''. the larger 1 is designed for 1/2'' - 4'' pipe with a tee of 1/2'' - 4''. i once had a tool converted to pull a 2'' tee on 6'' copper. what a money saver. not to mention the extra time and cost to join the 2 extra 6'' joints on a normal tee.

    the hand held version is made by "rems". this is for a person that does 1 fitting on a job. no production work.

    by the way. all joints on a pulled tee need to be brazed. not soft soldered.

    if interested in my electric tool, just send a email through this forum.

    rick.

    Comment


    • #3
      Rick,

      I don't know. I have alot of experience with Tee-Drills, but I don't think it's worth it for one 3/4" branch off of a 2" line. You still have to drain the system, etc. I don't see it as a big deal to solder a 2" tee at that point.

      I'm more impressed by the Pro-Press System than a tee-drill anymore.

      In this guys situation I would go with a traditional 2" tee.

      Sorry if I blow a sale for you Rick, but I've got to call 'em like I see 'em.

      the dog
      the dog

      Comment


      • #4
        I have 2 T-Drills myself and although quite handy during baterry installs I'll sell one as well. What I don't think is understood is the fact of silver soldering the joint after making the hole or even understanding the use or cost of such a tool. The Pro-Press would probably be a good solution although not a cost effective choice concidering the tool cost and the disrespect it's doing to our trade. Soldering a tee in and acting like a plumber would really show some skill to you're customer, and if you can't turn the water off and really want to show off invest in a wet tap kit for 1/4 the price. P.S. If I seem a little hostle, It's because anybody who just wanted to know what the tool was called did'nt have to ask us. 30 seconds on the web could tell you that, I just think you don't know how to use one, and if that's the question ask it.
        christopher

        Comment


        • #5
          alot of specs are not allowing the use of ''pulled tees'' anymore.

          rick.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Quescodeplumb:
            I have 2 T-Drills myself and although quite handy during baterry installs I'll sell one as well. What I don't think is understood is the fact of silver soldering the joint after making the hole or even understanding the use or cost of such a tool. The Pro-Press would probably be a good solution although not a cost effective choice concidering the tool cost and the disrespect it's doing to our trade. Soldering a tee in and acting like a plumber would really show some skill to you're customer, and if you can't turn the water off and really want to show off invest in a wet tap kit for 1/4 the price. P.S. If I seem a little hostle, It's because anybody who just wanted to know what the tool was called did'nt have to ask us. 30 seconds on the web could tell you that, I just think you don't know how to use one, and if that's the question ask it.
            I have a problem with your concept that new technology is "disrespecting the trade." I would take for granted you still join cast iron with lead and oakum, run your vent piping in threaded ganvanized pipe, and thread your own rod when hanging pipe. All of which was probably considered a disrepect to the trade when it was phased out.

            I don't necessarily advocate Pro-Press, because I haven't used it extensivly. But I realize two things:

            1) The new fluxes required in California (and some other states) is driving contractors to search for alternative joining methods. The simple fact is that even well qualified plumbers have experienced difficulties in soldering larger copper pipe in repair and shut-down situations. This has been discussed previously on this forum.

            2) Technology will not stop. It is up to us as plumbers and contractors to investigate these new products and systems to determine their value.

            Just some thoughts,

            the dog
            the dog

            Comment


            • #7
              dog, totally agree with you on this.
              we are on the same page.
              csst, is good for a quick gas line installation. i find it too costly for large scale work.
              pex is still up in the air here in calif. for domestic water.
              havn't tried or care too try cpvc.
              propress yes. t-drill limited now.
              leaded on closet rings.
              durham trap arm if necessary.
              no-hub, abs, clay all good.
              no galvanized on domestic water.

              rick.

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm not saying that easier ways of getting jobs done through new materials or tools is a bad thing. I just don't think people (do it yourself home owners) who think plumbing is easy because of these new products, eventually takes work away from us, and is probably not installed correctly. How many of us have heard someone say "I can do that, anybody can glue a few fittings together"? Besides with the cost of PVC cast iron might be cheaper pretty soon anyway.Oh and by the way there is a new line of fittings coming out by vitolic that acts like shark bite fittings with copper(just push it together and youre done) no solder, tools, nothing. So again it gets easier for everybody else to do our job and our pockets get smaller.
                christopher

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Quescodeplumb:
                  I'm not saying that easier ways of getting jobs done through new materials or tools is a bad thing. I just don't think people (do it yourself home owners) who think plumbing is easy because of these new products, eventually takes work away from us, and is probably not installed correctly. How many of us have heard someone say "I can do that, anybody can glue a few fittings together"? Besides with the cost of PVC cast iron might be cheaper pretty soon anyway.Oh and by the way there is a new line of fittings coming out by vitolic that acts like shark bite fittings with copper(just push it together and youre done) no solder, tools, nothing. So again it gets easier for everybody else to do our job and our pockets get smaller.
                  Quescodeplumb,

                  Joining pipe is the easiest part of plumbing. If all we are is pipe joiners, our trade would have expired generations ago.

                  What we know is plumbing codes, plumbing engineering, and protection of the plumbing health.

                  Are there homeowners who will bypass regulations and laws....sure. Welcome to the real world.

                  But we plumbers will survive, because we are the true protectors of public health, and the regulations that our society has established for our community protection.

                  Your job should not be dependant on a homeowner who is attempting to save some money (maybe because he dosen't have it) trying to fix his own plumbing problems.

                  the dog
                  the dog

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Quescodeplumb:
                    I have 2 T-Drills myself and although quite handy during baterry installs I'll sell one as well. What I don't think is understood is the fact of silver soldering the joint after making the hole or even understanding the use or cost of such a tool. The Pro-Press would probably be a good solution although not a cost effective choice concidering the tool cost and the disrespect it's doing to our trade. Soldering a tee in and acting like a plumber would really show some skill to you're customer, and if you can't turn the water off and really want to show off invest in a wet tap kit for 1/4 the price. P.S. If I seem a little hostle, It's because anybody who just wanted to know what the tool was called did'nt have to ask us. 30 seconds on the web could tell you that, I just think you don't know how to use one, and if that's the question ask it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by hightide323:
                      </font><blockquote>quote:</font><hr />Originally posted by Quescodeplumb:
                      I have 2 T-Drills myself and although quite handy during baterry installs I'll sell one as well. What I don't think is understood is the fact of silver soldering the joint after making the hole or even understanding the use or cost of such a tool. The Pro-Press would probably be a good solution although not a cost effective choice concidering the tool cost and the disrespect it's doing to our trade. Soldering a tee in and acting like a plumber would really show some skill to you're customer, and if you can't turn the water off and really want to show off invest in a wet tap kit for 1/4 the price. P.S. If I seem a little hostle, It's because anybody who just wanted to know what the tool was called did'nt have to ask us. 30 seconds on the web could tell you that, I just think you don't know how to use one, and if that's the question ask it.
                      </font>[/QUOTE]I work in a plumbing supply house, and I spent a helluva lot more than 30 seconds trying to find this tool for a customer of mine. If you have such a problem answering my post don't rspond anymore with your smartass replies. To everyone who did try to help,you have my gratitude.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hey dog, That's my point exactly the easier it gets the more violations there will be and the concern for the health of the nation increases because of the lack of code knowledge.
                        christopher

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Hey hightide 323, sorry for the harsh remarks I misread youre original post and I was wrong. If you still need info on the T-drill go to www.t-drill.fi and if youre customer is still looking for one they have plenty on e-bay.

                          [ 10-31-2005, 11:03 AM: Message edited by: Quescodeplumb ]
                          christopher

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Hang around High Tide. We need a supply house guy or two to help round out the over all skill set and knowledge base here. If you read some of the other postings you will see this is not a site where everyone is always all hugs and kisses and there have been some really good and interesting topics discussed and argued over on this site.

                            It's a good honest open forum. I must give Ridgid high regards for letting it stay that way even when we are not always kind to all of their products and their manufacturing stratagies.
                            Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              "We need a supply house guy or two to help round out the over all skill set and knowledge base here."

                              We need them HERE, in person, in the supply houses locally!! Most of the guys working in local supply houses around here don't know the difference between a union and a coupling.

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