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Extracting Threaded PVC Fitting

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  • Extracting Threaded PVC Fitting

    Any ideas how to extract the threaded portion of a PVC fitting if the rest of it breaks off and only leaves the threaded portion in place?

    I cannot seem to get my internal 3/4" pipe wrench or Ridgid pipe extractor (model 84 I believe) into the opening as it seems to be too small.

  • #2
    Hacksaw blade and carefully cut from inside the stub of pipe out toward the fitting.
    Make two or three cuts. If you angle adjacent cuts so the section between them is
    wedge shaped with the wider part to the inside it will pry out easier.

    Don't go deep enough to damage the fitting threads, just enough to weaken the piece
    of pipe so you can pry it out. Once you cut into the fitting threads, there is no way to
    fix them.

    A little heat might help too but no flame, use a heat gun and watch the temperature.
    You just want to soften, not melt and that's a fine line. But that would be my last resort.
    "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" ? Bob D. 2006
    "?ǝɹɐ sɹǝƃuıɟ ɹnoʎ ǝɹǝɥʍ ʍouʞ noʎ op `ʍɐs ǝlqɐʇ ɐ s,ʇı"

    https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute
    http://www.cordlessworkshop.net
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1p...qcZKHyrqKhikFA
    ----

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    • #3
      Could try a screw extractor ... The one in the pic is #00 , they have different sizes .... I use this one to remove the seat of a Symmons Temptrol shower valve .


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      • #4
        Thanks guys. I found a tool in HD for extracting broken sprinkler nipples which should work - if that does not I will look into your methods also.

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        • #5
          If it's threaded into copper or brass I've used a torch and just melted it out then hit the threads with a wire brush

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Cable or root View Post
            If it's threaded into copper or brass I've used a torch and just melted it out then hit the threads with a wire brush
            Unfortunately it is threaded into plastic as well. So I have be careful to take it out. It is actually an HVAC application were the primary condensate drain has snapped off leaving a threaded stub. If the threads on the coil pan get damaged that will turn into a big repair. So I have to be really careful how I handle this. In addition the access is not great (I mean when is anything easy). May have to end up cutting off one of the branch flex ducts to do the repair and then reconnect.

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            • #7


              "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" ? Bob D. 2006
              "?ǝɹɐ sɹǝƃuıɟ ɹnoʎ ǝɹǝɥʍ ʍouʞ noʎ op `ʍɐs ǝlqɐʇ ɐ s,ʇı"

              https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute
              http://www.cordlessworkshop.net
              https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1p...qcZKHyrqKhikFA
              ----

              Comment


              • #8
                Ha Ha - ok sure here it is


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                • Bob D.
                  Bob D. commented
                  Editing a comment
                  that's a tight spot for sure

                • blue_can
                  blue_can commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Most likely can get to it by squeezing up against the flex duct. Otherwise duct needs to come off. Of course they would use tape rather than zip ties to clamp the duct. Some contractors install stuff without regard to service - I recently had to take the cover off a coil. The installer had slathered duct mastic and then used some heavy duty tape over that. By the time I pulled it off I had partially destroyed the coil box. Good thing the coil ended up having to be replaced due to issues in the integrated cap tube system.

                  When I install I try to think of the people likely to service it in the future.

              • #9
                I think the HD extraction tool should work .... I just ordered one today for under 5 bucks ..


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                • #10
                  That's the one I've had for years and work good on plastic..

                  Rick
                  phoebe it is

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