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Rigid RC 1625 Blade Return Sleeve

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  • Rigid RC 1625 Blade Return Sleeve

    Hello, i need a the Blade Return Sleeve for RC 1625…it is broken! Is this item available?
    mfg Mich

  • #2
    https://www.ereplacementparts.com/ri...01_203478.html
    Attached Files
    "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" ? Bob D. 2004
    "?ǝɹɐ sɹǝƃuıɟ ɹnoʎ ǝɹǝɥʍ ʍouʞ noʎ op `ʍɐs ǝlqɐʇ ɐ s,ʇı"

    https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute
    http://www.cordlessworkshop.net
    https://youtube.com/@bobd.
    ----

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    • #3
      it amazes me to see the cost breakdown of each part. for kicks it would be interesting to see what it cost to piece together a replacement tool. I say 5x the cost of a new unit.

      Rick
      phoebe it is

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      • #4
        Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK View Post
        it amazes me to see the cost breakdown of each part. for kicks it would be interesting to see what it cost to piece together a replacement tool. I say 5x the cost of a new unit.

        Rick
        Yes, they are expensive, but with good reason. Not only do you have the cost to make the part just as you do when you first build the widget the part goes in to, but now you have to store it until someone needs it. That takes physical space plus a database system to know where it is, how many you have, and what the value of those parts is. You have to pay employees to maintain the warehouse, the computer system, and those who actually pull the part off the shelf and mail it out to you. Then you have salaries and taxes on the building, and all the product contained in the building. All those parts sitting on the shelves have value, and that value is taxable.

        So that part which costs only $1 to make and became part of a product going out the door in the next couple weeks to be sold now has a cost of $5 or more after just a couple years sitting on the shelf waiting to be needed. It's why the manufacturers don't keep spare parts very long once a product is no longer actively sold. They simply can't afford to.

        I saw this happen at a place I worked for many years. We had a constant battle with the warehouse as they were always wanting to surplus parts that had not been called for in 3 years. To their way of thinking it was cheaper to buy one in the future than pay to house that spare forever. They would argue that it was costing more than we paid for the part to keep it in the warehouse. We had to convince them that some of those parts they wanted to surplus were not available today at any price let alone a year or two from now if something broke in the future.

        On more than one occasion I would search for parts in the parts database and plan some work that needed those parts. But the work might not be scheduled until 6 or more months later because it had to be done during a certain time of year or wait for some equipment to be taken out of service. So time goes by and the guys go to get the parts for their work coming up next week only to find they are no longer in the warehouse but on their way to the scrapyard or the auction block. Then the decision has to be made do we do the work IF we can recover the parts on their way out or if it's too late for that can we buy them somewhere else and if so how much then weigh that cost against delaying the work. It's a viscous spiral of doom and gloom with no happy ending. At least from a financial perspective.
        "It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?" ? Bob D. 2004
        "?ǝɹɐ sɹǝƃuıɟ ɹnoʎ ǝɹǝɥʍ ʍouʞ noʎ op `ʍɐs ǝlqɐʇ ɐ s,ʇı"

        https://www.youtube.com/user/PowerToolInstitute
        http://www.cordlessworkshop.net
        https://youtube.com/@bobd.
        ----

        Comment

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