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  • #16
    Yeah a good power vice is preferable to the hand held but plum-bob has the little 600 so I thought i would give him some safe advice on how to use it since he seemed a sincere and competent do it yourselfer.

    Dog, I did reccommend he use the brace as a beginner. Perhaps I had become too complacent when using one of those, that is how injuries happen. One inch and down I just didn't bother with it, I agree it was a bad habit to obtain.
    Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

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    • #17
      carverelli, I worked a job with a sprinky who thought like you. He is dead now, the 1/2" right-angle drill motor he was using killed him when his sleeve got caught in the chuck and threw him off the scaffold. He fell over 20 feet to the ground banging into pipe and steel on the way down. I was an apprentice in my first year (28 years ago) and working just 50 feet from where he fell. It was the first fatality I was to witness on the job and unfortunately not the last.

      Working stupid kills people, sometimes the ones that die are not the ones who are working stupid. Try not to be one of those stupid workers.

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      • #18
        I have to admit to using a Hole Hawg in my younger years. The tough hole was holding on when I drilled holes for closet flanges. However there was only one Hole Hawg in the shop and it was on my personal truck. Hole Hawgs can get real dangerous when using the larger bits which plumbers use.

        Mark
        "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

        I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

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        • #19
          BobD, If that sprinky was your friend, I'm sorry for your loss and his. Serious injury/death on the job is not funny. The fact is that accidents do happen. You could be obeying ALL the rules and get hurt. My point was that some people are a danger to themselves and everyone around them just by breathing. Keep them away from a construction site. Dangerous activities happen all the time and sometimes you just grin and bear it. Those access ladders to rooftops in commercial buildings are one of my pet peeves. I had to haul my acetylene torch and several bags of tools up a set of those dang things today. If they want to put chillers and air handlers on a roof then install a service elevator.

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          • #20
            Utah, I was using one of the two speed hawgs on low drilling a 4 1/4 planetor bit through a 2x 12 joist. The flex in the plastic handle was enough that is scared me. The thought of the shredded plastic coming around and slashing my neck after it broke. I don't use a self feeder for holes that big any more. The lennox one tootrh hole swas are the way to go. The single speed hole hawg is the cats pajamas for 2 9/16 and under. If the drill binds up a guy can still hold w/o fear of it getting away from him.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by carverelli:
              BobD, If that sprinky was your friend, I'm sorry for your loss and his. Serious injury/death on the job is not funny. The fact is that accidents do happen. You could be obeying ALL the rules and get hurt. My point was that some people are a danger to themselves and everyone around them just by breathing. Keep them away from a construction site. Dangerous activities happen all the time and sometimes you just grin and bear it. Those access ladders to rooftops in commercial buildings are one of my pet peeves. I had to haul my acetylene torch and several bags of tools up a set of those dang things today. If they want to put chillers and air handlers on a roof then install a service elevator.
              Look jackass,

              I've been a plumbing/pipefitting foreman for fifteen years, and I can tell you accidents don't just happen and you grin and bear it. I've had guys go to emergency on my jobs, and thank God none were serious. But after each injury I assesed why it happened, and changed the policy on my job to prevent it from happening again.

              The number one thing I pride myself on as a foreman is my saftey record. I've had plumbers who like to work on my crew because of it.

              Your attitude stinks as a plumber, and I would run you off of my crew within a day.

              I will not repond to your posts again.

              Your hero,

              the dog
              the dog

              Comment


              • #22
                Well then DOG -I won't repond to your posts either so there. And my last post was really regarding BobD anyway. I have no use for you. I can cross the street on my own becuase my mommy taught me how to look both ways. And name calling - really its so like you-later dude

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                • #23
                  The expensive vise they sell for the 700 is'nt needed. What is needed is the handle the tool already comes with (or any 3/4" threaded male pipe end) and a pipe wrench. Simply grip the wrench onto the pipe you have vised on a tri-stand or whatever, of course being sure it is gripping in the correct direction, and screw the handle into the tool securely and place it against the wrench. Works just as good and I just saved ya 100$ I think, so you can donate it instead to my non-profit charity, send money order payable to....

                  Seriously, that's how I use my 700. I also agree with PlumbDog, I do not think oiling and threading with one of these, even if secured in above fashion or with Ridgid's doodad, is a safe thing to do. These machines do not have a high RPM like the right angle drills, but they have tremendous torque and these guys are right, it WILL hurt you the second you stop respecting it. I think when using these, if possible, a helper should be used to keep oil on the pipe while the operator does what he is suppoed to....operate the machine. I have of course used the 700 many times without doing so, but then I don't get as much oil on as I like because I only have two hands and I don't feel like taking any chances when I have the trigger pushed one one of these, I respect them too much for that and their ability to knock me on my a**. Usually though, if you are only threading 1" or less pipe, globs and globs of oil really are'nt needed unless you are threading tons. Just pour a healthy amount on the end of the pipe before you thread, start threading, and if you can add some more, if you can't I usually don't worry about it, with properly adjusted heads and minimal threading I have never ruined a set of dies this way, neither on the bench machines like the 300.

                  EdIT; Also, I wanted to add, I like to start the heads on by hand first, even on a tri-stand but especially if working on in-place pipe, I often find it somewhat hard and even dangerous to start the threads by pushing on machine with palm of hand. Usually, with well-set dies, you can start a head on the pipe end by hand, get it snug THEN place the head into the machine and continue.

                  BTW, using 1/2" right angle drills don't have to be so dangerous either if proper bracing technique is used and common sense. I used a Hole-Hawg for years without an injury before these DeWalt clutch drills came out (which I love), but I on one job a few years ago I saw a guy next to me break his jaw with one, and thankfully he was'nt on a ladder. Yes, these tools are dangerous but if you just RTFM and use common sense, all should be well with the world.

                  [ 11-13-2005, 11:06 PM: Message edited by: AZPlumber ]

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                  • #24
                    "The lennox one tootrh hole swas are the way to go. "

                    Ditto. I started using them in the last year and they're great.

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                    • #25
                      It took me a minute on RTFM but I finally understood and I agree.

                      Its not only on strong power tools but why someone would drop 45000 on a truck and never read the owners manual is beyond me.
                      Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

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                      • #26
                        "minute on RTFM"

                        It's one of my favorite acronyms, especially on forums such as these.

                        Especially since most manuals are now available in PDF on this site and many others.

                        Far as a 40,000 ANYTHING, the first thing I would do is read manuals, not really so much at first for safety but I would be so proud and happy of my new toy I would seek and absorb any information I could find on it, lol, so yes that is kind of incomprehensible to me.

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                        • #27
                          I should add too, to even further reduce chance of injury and use of the machine, that it should'nt be necessary, except maybe on larger diameter pipe, to engage the machine in reverse to back off the die. Just check to ensure you don't have excess shavings which may bind in the threads upon reversing, engage the machine in reverse slightly to ease the head back, slide the machine off the head and the head should easily spin off by hand.

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