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  • Never threaded before

    I have to thread a few pieces of 1" black iron pipe using a Ridgid 600. Can someone with a wee
    bit of experience walk me thru the process, especially the concept of using cutting oil. Never done this before so I'm not keen on screwing it up.

  • #2
    plumb bobb,
    Here is a link to the online version of the operator's manual. It explains the process in good detail as far as setting up and operating the tool.

    http://www.ridgid.com/Manuals/600Manual.pdf

    In regards to the other aspects of the process, make sure that you cut the pipe nice and square and that all burs (ID and OD) are properly removed, while threading use plenty of oil to ensure that you are cooling your dies and the thread you are creating. I personally believe that you can not put too much oil on the cutting area (unless you are making a mess). The most common thing that I see is that not enough oil is applied, or the pipe is prepared improperly. I hope that this is of some assistance.

    Comment


    • #3
      Plumb,

      I'm not a hugh fan of a Novice using a "power threader" because they can be dangerous. If you are working for a plumbing contractor it is probably better to ask your foreman for the correct operating proceedures. If not, please read the instruction manual carefully, for your own saftey. I'm not able to give you specific instructions, because I don't think I could properly train you in this context.

      For general information regarding threading pipe I gave a post response a while back on a thread named "Threading Steel Pipe."

      BE CAREFUL

      the dog
      the dog

      Comment


      • #4
        Once upon a time I couldn't do anything myself...but I kept tryin'. Now I can even butter my own bread (but I still don't iron clothes!).

        All kidding aside, I appreciate the warnings and I am generally very careful. I've done some threading using a manual threader, but it was
        terribly hard work and slooooow.

        About the oil, should I apply continously or at intervals? And I presume when operating the threader, I will be moving forward and backward
        or continuously forward?

        Doing this for myself so no OJT possible.

        Comment


        • #5
          plumb bobb, the electric threader will thread the pipe continually in the forward direction. thread the pipe just past the die chaser. a properly adjusted die head will permit you to hand thread the pipe approx. 2&1/2 turns.once threaded then you reverse the direction to back off the die on an electric hand held machine. a bench style machine you open the die head. reverse is not used for removing the dies.
          it's not necessary to flood the pipe with oil, but we typically recycle the oil back into the pump so it's not being wasted.make sure there is enough oil to keep the die cool. oil is cheaper than new dies. there is an aerosol type threading oil that's great for a few quick threads. this style is not reused.
          also be careful with the torque of the machine. typically anything over 1'' should be properly clamped against the machine to counteract the torque. both the ridgid #600 and 700 have a clamping device that will allow you to thread without a vice. very nice for working in place and short pieces.

          rick.

          Comment


          • #6
            Plumb-Bobb,

            My post was not meant to insult your intellegence, it was out of concern for your safety.

            A stationary pipe machine can be dangerous (as can any power tool), but hand-held "power head" type threaders are vary dangerous if not used properly. I would suggest more training than you will get on a web-site before using one.

            the dog
            the dog

            Comment


            • #7
              If you think a right angle drill can give you a headache when it gets loose, that times 10 and you have a power hand threader.

              Mark
              "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

              I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

              Comment


              • #8
                Yes, if your not careful a ridgid 700 has the capability to rip your arm off and beat you to death with it. Just remember something IS going to turn.

                Comment


                • #9
                  plumb-bobb, these guys are right.. its better to get an expert's assistance, hands-on, rather than relying only on the manuals.. (either the machine turns or you turn..)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    unless I miss my guess most of you girls are using right angle long handle drills will some kind of clutch. Woosses. Hole hawg is the plumbers drill -everything else is a knock off the ladder

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      plumb bobb, go ahead and string a power cord and let her rip. The worst thing that can happen is you'll brace for the torque in the wrong direction and the tool will flip out of your hands and swing around and knock you in the nards.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        plumb-bob,

                        First disregard everything written by carverelli.

                        Second make sure you are wearing no loose clothing or if its cold that you have no hood strings or jacket zippers that could be caught in the tool. It is possible to be severely injured with this equipment.

                        Your posts seem to indicate you are a capable do it yourselfer and you respect saftey and the proper way to do things. So I will help where I can.

                        For one inch pipe you will probably not need the pipe brace that can hold the tool from spinning but since you have not used this machine before I reccomend using the pipe brace. Slip this on over the pipe and add a healthy layer of cutting oil to the outside end of the pipe you want to thread. Making sure you have solid and clear footing put your machine on the end of the pipe. I reccomend wearing smooth leather gloves that have no "flap" over the palm. Holding the handle of the threader in your right hand with your elbow locked, push in on the threader with your left hand palm keeping your fingers outstretched away from the die. Pull the trigger. Always be ready to release the trigger if a piece of clothing or glove becomes intangled. ( For your first thread ask your wife or a friend to stand by to pull the plug should the brace slip and you are unable to release the trigger.)

                        Once the die has caught, or started threading, release the trigger. Pull the pipe brace forward to where the rod just enters the handle of your threader by about 1/2 the width of the handle and lock the brace to the pipe.

                        Add a little more oil to the end of the pipe through the die. Keep a bucket under the pipe if you are not using an oiler. With your oil can in your left hand and ready to pump and your right hand firmly on the handle of the tool pull the trigger and oil thouroughly through out the threading process. When one thread protrudes past the last cutting die in the machine let go of the trigger. Reverse the switch and the threader will remove itself from the end of the pipe and clean the threads of shavings. Wipe off all excess oil from the outside of the pipe and clean the inside with a rag using a screwdriver or sometghing similar to push the rage far enough in to get all the oil. Be sure that all thread shavings are out of the pipe before installation.
                        Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by plumber:
                          plumb-bob,

                          First disregard everything written by carverelli.

                          Second make sure you are wearing no loose clothing or if its cold that you have no hood strings or jacket zippers that could be caught in the tool. It is possible to be severely injured with this equipment.

                          Your posts seem to indicate you are a capable do it yourselfer and you respect saftey and the proper way to do things. So I will help where I can.

                          For one inch pipe you will probably not need the pipe brace that can hold the tool from spinning but since you have not used this machine before I reccomend using the pipe brace. Slip this on over the pipe and add a healthy layer of cutting oil to the outside end of the pipe you want to thread. Making sure you have solid and clear footing put your machine on the end of the pipe. I reccomend wearing smooth leather gloves that have no "flap" over the palm. Holding the handle of the threader in your right hand with your elbow locked, push in on the threader with your left hand palm keeping your fingers outstretched away from the die. Pull the trigger. Always be ready to release the trigger if a piece of clothing or glove becomes intangled. ( For your first thread ask your wife or a friend to stand by to pull the plug should the brace slip and you are unable to release the trigger.)

                          Once the die has caught, or started threading, release the trigger. Pull the pipe brace forward to where the rod just enters the handle of your threader by about 1/2 the width of the handle and lock the brace to the pipe.

                          Add a little more oil to the end of the pipe through the die. Keep a bucket under the pipe if you are not using an oiler. With your oil can in your left hand and ready to pump and your right hand firmly on the handle of the tool pull the trigger and oil thouroughly through out the threading process. When one thread protrudes past the last cutting die in the machine let go of the trigger. Reverse the switch and the threader will remove itself from the end of the pipe and clean the threads of shavings. Wipe off all excess oil from the outside of the pipe and clean the inside with a rag using a screwdriver or sometghing similar to push the rage far enough in to get all the oil. Be sure that all thread shavings are out of the pipe before installation.
                          I'm going to disagree with you on not using a brace. The problem with that is you need to oil with one hand and thread with the other. Even with small pipe the die can bind. I don't recommend this system. I think it's dangerous. To be honest, I don't like those power-head threaders period. I think they are a danger to anyone but a very experienced plumber, and should be used only to thread in-place pipe with the proper equipment utilized.

                          the dog
                          the dog

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            disregard everything I say because I'm a hazard to the industry. You guys absolutely kill me. Unless you are properly trained by the manufacturers public rep step away from the power tool because you might spontaneously combust. You will probably be ok if you have your handy dandy asbestos suit and safety goggles(not glasses) and shield. I don't remember the first time I used a power threader but it was no big deal. If you've used power tools before, and are still breathing and have all you fingers and toes just jump in and do it. Some people belong in an office away from anything that might hurt them. Others are made to live on the edge. As a non-union tradesman
                            with almost 20 years experience,I've done so many dangerous(from an OSHA perspective) things on the job I lost track. With the exception of a back injury(on one knee and twisted wrong) I've never had a lost time accident. When I'm not comfortable doing something I don't do it(there has been several times, yes). If you're the kind of guy that trips on your shadow maybe go to home depot and buy the size of threaded pipe you need. Some of the guys on thissite would enroll you in a 16 hour course on how to use a power threader, but its just isn't that big of deal.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              When I started out in a HVAC shop we use to use the 700 threader as we didn't do much threading. As a plumber I never had much of a use for a power hand threader. If you were in a service truck you used a 300 or 400 and if you were in a rough-in truck you used a Collins 22-A. We also used the Ridgid 141s and 161s but those were used with a drive line and a power vise. If we had to thread an in place pipe it was pretty much by hand.

                              Mark
                              "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                              I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                              Comment

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