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DRIP LEGS ON GAS LINES

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  • DRIP LEGS ON GAS LINES

    in sf they make us put in a crazy amount of them. this is in there amandments to the upc. never found debrea taking out old ones! of cource i do as i,m told.
    what are your thoughts,please
    I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

  • #2
    Drip legs are more for moisture than debri. All appliance manufacturers ewquire drip legs ahead of the appliance if you have moisture in the gas. The UPC requires gas piping with "wet" gas to be sloped 1/4" in 15' to prevent moisture from getting into appliances.

    The natural gas burned in Soutern California is extremely clean and dry so nothing is required.

    Mark
    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

    Comment


    • #3
      While I can agree with Utah that drip legs are mostly for moisture and there is not a lot of debris in a gas pipe. I do think they are still a good idea. How often have we witnessed installers, pressed by their superiors for production, install gas pipe without thouroughly cleaning metal shavings and cutting oil out of the pipe.

      Also the act of pushing a pipe through a hole drilled in wood can cause small wood shavings or dust to enter the pipe. Even the flexible stainless tubing can get wood chips or debris introduced during installation.

      The cost of a drip leg is about ten bucks,(a tee, cap and one nipple and 5 minutes labor) then this protection is there for the life of the gas appliance and probably the life of the home. MHO
      Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

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      • #4
        that,s all reasonable, one before each appliance.
        now add one on each change of dirrection
        I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

        Comment


        • #5
          having removed many drip legs in the replacement of water heaters, i'm still waiting to find any debris. what i do find is lack of reaming and doping of the female thread. i don't do lpg gas work, so moisture is not an issue here.

          rick.

          Comment


          • #6
            Tool,
            Yes a drip leg at every change of direction is ridiculous. That kind of overkill can eventually endanger an entire code system.

            Rick,
            Pipe dope is not required on female threads of joints until you reach 1 1/4" in size. Most manufacturers don't even require it until 1 1/2 inch IPS.

            I agree about the lack of reaming. If the pipe is over sized it does not hurt anything, but when the lines are sized to the minimum the flow interuption caused can cause the appliance to be starved for gas. This can probably be blamed on poor training, laziness, indifference and sometimes over pushed production schedules.
            Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

            Comment


            • #7
              plumber, i don't think that any female threads are allowed to be doped. what i stated is that i find lack of reaming and people are using dope on the female threads causing a restriction of flow.
              i'm not aware of being allowed to dope any size of female fitting. i know that it happens all the time, but i'm not aware that it was recommended.
              bring me up to date.

              rick.

              Comment


              • #8
                Rick,

                On threaded pipe systems over 1 1/2 inches in diameter all sealant companies I am aware of reccomend adding dope to the female side as well. When you get to sizes like three inch and such you won't even be able to tighten them properly if you haven't doped both sides. I often add it on 1 1/4 as well because the quality of fittings available have declined so much in this new age of globalism. In addition I will usually put teflon tape on the male threads as well as the thread compound. This makes for such a smooth tightening of the joint one can almost downsize the pipe wrench required.

                Anything under 1 1/4 should never see dope on the female threads.

                Grab a can of Rector Seal Monday and see what it says about applications.

                Sorry about misunderstanding your first post.
                Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

                Comment


                • #9
                  No need to wait for Monday, here it is from Restorseal no. 5 Instructions on Rectorseal's website:

                  INSTRUCTIONS:

                  1. Stir before using. Wipe threads clean.

                  2. For pipe diameters up to 1 1/4", apply to male threads only. For larger sizes, apply to both male and female threads.

                  3. Join and tighten pipe to ANSI Standards

                  4. Wipe excess sealant from joints. For natural gas, air and water lines up to 2" diameter and up to 100 psi, piping systems may be placed into immediate service. For other service and application conditions, cure times may vary. Contact Technical Service for recommended cure times.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    For those of you subject to the Uniform Plumbing Code, see Section 316.1.1 which in part reads:"When a pipe joint material is used, it shall be applied only on male threads..."

                    (California Plumbing Code, 2001 ed.)

                    That said, I normally dope the female threads on 3" or larger pipe.

                    the dog
                    the dog

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                    • #11
                      thanks dog for refreshing my memory. i knew i read this as an apprentice years ago. that's why i questioned it. you're right about doping the large fittings. ya gotta do what ya gotta do!

                      big bark out to the DOG!

                      rick.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: DRIP LEGS ON GAS LINES

                        Originally posted by plumbdog10 View Post
                        For those of you subject to the Uniform Plumbing Code, see Section 316.1.1 which in part reads:"When a pipe joint material is used, it shall be applied only on male threads..."

                        (California Plumbing Code, 2001 ed.)

                        That said, I normally dope the female threads on 3" or larger pipe.

                        the dog
                        Morning Dog, You keep on giving on old posts, Thanks Tool
                        I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: DRIP LEGS ON GAS LINES

                          Originally posted by ToUtahNow View Post
                          Drip legs are more for moisture than debri. All appliance manufacturers ewquire drip legs ahead of the appliance if you have moisture in the gas. The UPC requires gas piping with "wet" gas to be sloped 1/4" in 15' to prevent moisture from getting into appliances.

                          The natural gas burned in Soutern California is extremely clean and dry so nothing is required.



                          Mark
                          It is now required. As I understand code, local communities can add to but not take away from it. I can't say I've ever seen a heater fail due to lack of one.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: DRIP LEGS ON GAS LINES

                            Do You UPC Guys add drip legs before Gas dryers. And do You install a door service panel in the sheet rock ? Maybe I'm crazy !
                            I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: DRIP LEGS ON GAS LINES

                              No, never have and we've done thousands upon thousands. Never been called or asked about. Of course i've been out of new construction since 97.

                              Rick.
                              phoebe it is

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