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replacing a tub/shower faucet?

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  • #16
    Canadave,

    The bibb washer is simply the flat washer on the bottom of the stem you purchased. The seat (bibb seat) is the brass piece the bibb washer is pressed against to stop the water from leaking while the stem is closed.

    Almost 90% of the time a new washer is all that is needed when a faucet leaks. When a new washer will not completely stop a leak it is usually a nick in the seat or the threads on the seat at the valve body.

    A small drip every 15 seconds may not bother most people but I get the feeling it will bother you now that you have some plumbing knowledge.

    Mark
    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

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    • #17
      heh...you're right, a small drip will certainly nag at me now!

      So given the fact that there's entirely new stem cartridges (bibb washer, seat, valves, and everything else), and there's still a slight drip, am I pretty much done in terms of basic home repair I can do (i.e. time to bring in an expert to put in a better faucet assembly)? I don't see anything else I can mess with, other than taking off the whole faucet (which I don't feel qualified to do).

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      • #18
        Canadave,

        I'm not sure you have replaced your seats yet. In Canada what you call a cartdigde, we in the United States call a stem. Here a cartridge would not have a seat unless it is built into the cartridge. You have a compression stem which has a seperate seat.

        I found a link which does a pretty good job of putting things in layman terms and includes some diagrams.

        http://www.chase-pitkin.com/How-To/P...lves/valve.htm

        I don't think you are ready for a contractor just yet. I think with a little research you should be able to find the right seat and seat wrench to finish the repair.

        Mark
        "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

        I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

        Comment


        • #19
          Yeah, I saw that diagram in the course of my searching for info a couple of days ago (that diagram seems to be on a million websites!) [img]smile.gif[/img]

          The thing is, the valve seats that you're talking about seem pretty much like decorative trim on my faucet. If I remove them, it looks to me like it'll still work the same way--they don't seem to be holding water in, or holding any kind of assembly in place.

          [ 10-18-2005, 10:23 PM: Message edited by: canadave ]

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          • #20
            canadave,
            If you are unable to get your slow srip stopped we might be able to get you through a replacement process.

            What is behind the tub in question? Is it a closet, drywall behind a heavy piece of furniture or possibly a kitchen cabinet?

            There are a few things you might be able to do here depending on what backs up to the tub. Since this is a smaller than normal faucet we might be able to get you through this process without too much pain.

            Do you have copper, plastic or galvanized waterlines?
            Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by wbrooks:
              DAve, looks like a Moen faucet. If it is you can get the parts to repair it free at Home Depot. Turn off the main water, remove the plastic centers in each tap (there is a small slot in the red and blue rings to allow a small screw driver to pry them off) remove the screw that is under the plastic caps, now remove the plastic tap handles. You will now see the two valves, remove them with an adjustable wrench or channel locks. IF they are the cartridge type, take them to the new bathroom fixtures rep, they keep free replacements in a drawer there. If there is a rubber washer on the opposite end of the stem, take them to the plumbing isle and get a rep to show you the washers and seats that you will need to replace (not free but under $5)
              Get the Home Depot rep to show you what washers you need? I can't get accurate directions to the restroom from those people.

              the dog
              the dog

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              • #22
                Canadave, I agree with plumber, if you have a closet on the other side of the shower body, just cut a 12x12 hole replace the valve, tub spout, and shower head. You only need the 12x12 for the valve itself!, the rest is done from the front, and will come with. When you're done place a 12x12 access door/panel over the hole, and be happy with what you have (not insane with what you can't fix, that looks the same.) Oh and after that's all done you can always service you're valve, or show youre friends how clever you are. Again, Plumber has a good point let us know what kind of pipe you have, as to make sure you make the connection properly. Have fun and don't rush especially if you have another shower.
                christopher

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                • #23
                  Canadave,

                  If your seats are non-removable I think you are at the end of the road. Changing the valve from the backside is not terribly tough but you will have to use another one piece mixing valve and spout. I believe Waltec is history but others still make valves like that. I have a big 5th wheel travel trailer with that exact style valve but I also have an access panel installed behind the valve from the factory.

                  On a normal valve change out you could go to any style valve you wanted to and add a "Smitty" plate to hide the damage. Because your spout is part of the mixing valve that will not work.

                  To rerplace the valve without tile work you either need to find the same style valve or use a column shower.

                  Good luck - Mark
                  "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                  I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    [quote]Originally posted by plumbdog10:
                    Originally posted by wbrooks:
                    Get the Home Depot rep to show you what washers you need? I can't get accurate directions to the restroom from those people.

                    the dog
                    Up here in the frozen north some of the Home Depots run a bit different than the masses. If you go in during the day you will find a retired tradesman in most of the departments. Great guys to just chat with, most are there cause they enjoy talking to people and it gets them out of the house for awhile

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                    • #25
                      Wow....thanks everybody for your great replies. I really appreciate the lack of condescension, something that too many "professionals" seem to think is necessary when dealing with people who are amateurs at their chosen craft. Encouragement is a much better tack to take...thanks for that.

                      Now to answer some questions that were posed:

                      The waterlines, as far as I know, are copper; at least the ones I can see in the basement seem to be that.

                      Behind the tub is a wall to another room, not a closet; I'm loathe to start cutting holes in it to get at the plumbing just to fix a slightly drippy faucet (actually it seems even less today...one tiny drip every few minutes), so I think after all things considered we're just going to let this one sit as is for now.

                      Thanks to everybody again for your concern and helpful suggestions and pointers!

                      Dave

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                      • #26
                        canadave,

                        Your welcome, come on back if the drip keeps you up at at night.
                        Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

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                        • #27
                          Hmmmmmm.....I'm back (not a good sign!)

                          So after a couple of days of using the shower with both stems replaced, there's a pretty good drip going. Not only that, but whereas the faucet handles used to have no "give" (they would turn freely until hitting their "endpoint" and then suddenly stop and not turn much further), now they both have a good bit of give. I can shut off the water and then turn the handles more...they feel "mushy" for lack of a better word.

                          Could I have installed them wrong? I mean, the stems are in the correct way and all, but did I need to do something else, like coat them in plumbers grease or wrap them in plumbers tape? And why would the handles suddenly become mushy? This suggests to me that the washers in the back of the stems are somehow not making good "contact" when they close up...but both of them at once?

                          Help? *faint laugh*

                          Dave

                          [ 10-22-2005, 11:01 AM: Message edited by: canadave ]

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                          • #28
                            WAIT a minute...I think I see what you guys are talking about now.

                            The diagram makes it look as though that little ring of trim is the valve seat--that's what I thought you guys were referring to. But the seat is actually INSIDE the faucet pipe, right??? NOW I get it. Stupid, stupid me! *banging myself on the head*

                            I'll have to look at those to see if they're removable or not. I'll report back.

                            Still though...should I have done something else with the stems i.e. grease/tape?

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                            • #29
                              If your seats are removeable you should se they are either 4 or 5 sided inside the seat. That is where the seat wrench goes.

                              You should wipe some plumber's grease on all of the rubber parts and on the threads of the stem itself.

                              Mark
                              "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                              I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Thanks, that's much clearer. The boss (my wife) wants me to do it after this weekend (we've got a million other things to do)...so Monday at latest I'll have a better idea of what needs to be replaced/dressed.

                                Thanks again,
                                Dave

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