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replacing a tub/shower faucet?

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  • #31
    OK, I've had a look inside my faucet again. I shined a flashlight inside after I took off the stems, and I see at the back that there's what looks like a metal ring, about a quarter-inch or so in diameter, which has a hexagonal hole in the centre of it.

    I take it that the ring is the "valve seat", correct? And the existence of the hexagonal hole means it's replaceable?

    My plan now is to go to Home Depot and get a valve seat wrench, try to remove it, and replace the seats. Can I buy the seats at HD as well, or do I need to remove the seats first and bring them along with me on a 2nd trip so I can see exactly which ones to get? In other words, are seats as "proprietary" as the stems were, or are they fairly generic?

    Thanks for all your help, guys...I'm getting closer!

    Dave

    [ 10-25-2005, 12:46 PM: Message edited by: canadave ]

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    • #32
      canadave,

      Good job it sounds like your getting it taken care of. I would get the seat wrench first and take the seat back on a second trip unless Home Depot has a package of Waltec seats on the wall when you buy the seat wrench.

      Some times finding the right seat is the hardest part of the job. Although I believe Waltec is no longer making faucets they are owned by Masco. Masco is the largest plumbing manufacturer in the World so a Waltec faucet may share a seat with another brand.

      Good luck - Mark
      "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

      I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

      Comment


      • #33
        hehe....wouldn't you know it. I found a seat wrench, got the old seats out, saw they were corroded, put in the new seats (HD happened to conveniently have the right Waltec replacement seats), put the stem back in, started to tighten the stem....and just as I was ready to stop tightening the stem, it suddenly slipped and became loose. I backed off, took the stem off and inspected it...the brass pieces had become bent, the bibb washer was askew, and the rubber O-ring was stripped completely off.

        sigh....off to HD to get a new one to replace this new one I just bought last week!

        [ 10-25-2005, 02:56 PM: Message edited by: canadave ]

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        • #34
          MISSION ACCOMPLISHED!!!!

          New stem went in PERFECTLY....turned on water, tested it, everything is A-OK, no drips or leaks. AWESOME!!

          And not only did I fix it, but I learned a whole bunch about faucets and plumbing in the process. "Teach a man to fish" and all that I can't thank you guys enough.

          --Dave

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          • #35
            Originally posted by canadave:
            hehe....wouldn't you know it. I found a seat wrench, got the old seats out, saw they were corroded, put in the new seats (HD happened to conveniently have the right Waltec replacement seats), put the stem back in, started to tighten the stem....and just as I was ready to stop tightening the stem, it suddenly slipped and became loose. I backed off, took the stem off and inspected it...the brass pieces had become bent, the bibb washer was askew, and the rubber O-ring was stripped completely off.

            sigh....off to HD to get a new one to replace this new one I just bought last week!
            Holy Cow Dave don't ruin all your good work now. These things should be snugged but not over tightened. If the O-ring is what is sealing the stem all you need to do is compress the O-ring enough to seal the stem.

            Mark
            "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

            I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

            Comment


            • #36
              LOL...NOW I see that. I must have overtightened the stem at first. With this new one, I just tightened it enough to be "tight" but not "to the point where I'd need a hydraulic press to go any further." As you point out, that was the way to go, and it's perfect now!

              Just out of curiosity, as an aside....what kinds of things in plumbing DO need to be screwed on as tight as your muscles can make them?

              Dave

              [ 10-25-2005, 03:52 PM: Message edited by: canadave ]

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              • #37
                Dave,

                The best rule of thumb is to look at what you are trying to seal and with what type of material. The new rubber which is now being used need very little tightening beyond hand tight.

                Connecting screwed pipe is where you get into some muscle but even then you need to make sure you're using the right wrench for the job. Tightening a 1/2" line with a 48" wrench is overkill while a 10" wrench for the same pipe is probably too small.

                Steel pipe takes more effort than brass pipe while plastic pipe threads are more about the sealant used than the effort.

                Bottom line we've all over tighten fittings at one time or another and that's how we learn the proper way to do it. What good plumbers have over non-plumbers is years of mistakes (also known as experience) which makes us better at what we do.

                Mark

                [ 10-25-2005, 04:13 PM: Message edited by: ToUtahNow ]
                "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                Comment


                • #38
                  Thanks Mark, that all makes sense. I didn't realize there was a new rubber being used, either.

                  Experience certainly is the best teacher, eh? Glad you were here to help me along though...I appreciate it.

                  Dave

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                  • #39
                    canadave, what you did was not because of overtightening, but because you had the stem in the fully closed position when you wrenched it in. we've all done that. you basically bottomed out the washer onto the seat. continuing to tighten you then bent the stem. luckiley you didn't damage the valve threads.
                    a rule of thumb is to make sure that the stem is free to turn when you are installing or removing a stem. then you can't go wrong. fortunatly a newer style ceramic stem doesn't have these concerns.
                    congradulations for being able to walk your way through the complete steps of faucet repairs. most plumbers don't replace the seats. seats will usually last longer than every washer if you repair the faucet before it drips too long or too bad. the water that jets past the bad washer will eat away at the soft brass seat like a sand blaster. fortunatly seats are cheap and are almost always replaceable since the 40's. ceramic stem faucets don't typically use seats. although they do mate onto a flat surface. toilet ballcocks typically don't have replaceable seats except for the higher end more expensive ballcocks. most are plastic now.

                    next lesson, soldering copper.
                    lession #1. don't burn your fingers. whoops 1 lession i could have paid more attention to last week. getting better.

                    rick.

                    [ 10-25-2005, 07:28 PM: Message edited by: PLUMBER RICK ]

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                    • #40
                      lol...wow, Rick...that makes sense...now that you mention it, I'm sure that's what I did (bottoming out the washer on the stem when installing it). It's funny...I had sort of been idly wondering, while installing it, whether it made a difference having the stem twisted out or not...as I recall, I quickly put it out of my mind as probably having no effect whatsoever Smart move

                      Soldering pipe?? Well, I think I'll read up a little more on that, lest I burn my house down, before I try it

                      What I WOULD like to do at some point is create that 12x12 space in the wall behind my shower and put a swingplate on it, like you guys suggested. I'll tackle that someday...for now I'm just happy with my fully-functional shower When I *am* ready to tackle it though, I know where to turn.

                      Thanks again,
                      Dave

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                      • #41
                        Re: replacing a tub/shower faucet?

                        Hi! I know this is an old topic, but I need a bit of dumb info. I too have a Waltec 12 like canadave has. I have a SERIOUS leaking problem that has been growing for about a month. I was given to understand that I probably just needed to replace the whole darn thing. After some sleuthing, I determined that it is now the Delta Waltec 14F525 faucet. So, I went out and got one. And of course there's no instructions with it.

                        First question. (I'm blushing cause I think this is a dumb question but I am just not sure) Do I have to turn the water supply off? Like canadave I have no access to the back of the faucet and, even in the basement where you can trace the pipes to close to the tub, I can't find a shut off valve. So...if the taps are turned off when I disassemble everything, does that keep the water from coming out?

                        Other than that, I found a great site http://blogs.nimblebrain.net/index.p...=1&disp=single
                        with some very user friendly diagrams. Is there anything else I need to know?

                        Thank you so much for your help. I love the internet!

                        Jac'y

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Re: replacing a tub/shower faucet?

                          Originally posted by Nanuk View Post
                          Hi! I know this is an old topic, but I need a bit of dumb info. I too have a Waltec 12 like canadave has. I have a SERIOUS leaking problem that has been growing for about a month. I was given to understand that I probably just needed to replace the whole darn thing. After some sleuthing, I determined that it is now the Delta Waltec 14F525 faucet. So, I went out and got one. And of course there's no instructions with it.

                          First question. (I'm blushing cause I think this is a dumb question but I am just not sure) Do I have to turn the water supply off? Like canadave I have no access to the back of the faucet and, even in the basement where you can trace the pipes to close to the tub, I can't find a shut off valve. So...if the taps are turned off when I disassemble everything, does that keep the water from coming out?

                          Other than that, I found a great site http://blogs.nimblebrain.net/index.p...=1&disp=single
                          with some very user friendly diagrams. Is there anything else I need to know?

                          Thank you so much for your help. I love the internet!

                          Jac'y
                          Waltec seems to be something which was used North of the border from most of us. That being said we are attracting more and more Canadian plumbers to this board. While I have never worked on a Waltec, yes you have to turn the water off to do the job. As far as the nuts I'm not too sure what the setup is but my guess is you could use an easy-out which will pull the nipple out and then you would replace the nipple and union nut as one piece.

                          Mark
                          "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                          I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Re: replacing a tub/shower faucet?

                            Thanks for your reply - I guess I will shut off the water at the main house shut off (cause that's the only one I can find!) and go from there. Thank you for the suggestion re: the easy out.

                            I will let you know what happens!

                            Jac'y

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                            • #44
                              Re: replacing a tub/shower faucet?

                              Hello all you expert plumbers out there! I need some advice. My husband is in Iraq and we just bought a new house. I went to use the shower today (thank god we have 2 bathrooms) and i turned the shower and and went to push in the button to make the water come out of the shower head and the button shot off and water came out of the hole where the button used to be!!!!! Needless to say it scared the **** out of me and I have no idea what to. Please help!!!!

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                              • #45
                                Re: replacing a tub/shower faucet?

                                can you post a photo?

                                is the button on the wall plate or tub spout? is there a name on the faucet trim?

                                moen, price phister, delta?

                                probably a simple repair if you can post a photo.

                                rick.
                                phoebe it is

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