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  • Best way to do it???

    I have to run a 1/2in gas line from the meter underground 6ft and go through a brick wall. Basically, I will go from a tee at the meter underground and then pop back up and go through the wall. I would like to keep everything above ground galvanized steel, but I am not sure what to run underground. If I was to run galvanized pipe, do the joints underground have to be welded or can I just seal them? I thought about CSST, but that would be a costly route because of the short run (a lot of waste). I also thought about running soft copper through pvc and connecting it to the steel pipe above ground. What would you guys do?

  • #2
    It looks like you are aware of most of your options and judging by your description of what you want to do it would be easy to assume that you already know the proper methods of joining and coating the different piping material. So, assuming you already know the proper way to join and seal pipe I offer the following:

    Since you only have a 6 ft. run under ground and intend to run galvanized pipe for the rest of your exposed work then running galvanized the entire distance and wrapping it with the yellow protective tape is a reasonable way to go. There are methods which will offer more protection but if you be sure to wrap the pipe and seal the joints well, then you will have a good job that should last a few decades. I know of many similar installations that are working well that were installed decades before my old bones were even a twinkle in my daddies eye.
    Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by plumber:
      It looks like you are aware of most of your options and judging by your description of what you want to do it would be easy to assume that you already know the proper methods of joining and coating the different piping material. So, assuming you already know the proper way to join and seal pipe I offer the following:

      Since you only have a 6 ft. run under ground and intend to run galvanized pipe for the rest of your exposed work then running galvanized the entire distance and wrapping it with the yellow protective tape is a reasonable way to go. There are methods which will offer more protection but if you be sure to wrap the pipe and seal the joints well, then you will have a good job that should last a few decades. I know of many similar installations that are working well that were installed decades before my old bones were even a twinkle in my daddies eye.
      I agree with plumber, but to be more specific I would wrap the pipe with two layers of 10 mil. tape.

      the dog
      the dog

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      • #4
        First off, I don't know what code your state uses, but here it is NOT code to run 1/2" line from the meter if it is to be used to tie in aany kind of larger appliance like a boiler, furnace or range. It can be REDUCED down to 1/2" from, say, 3/4 or 1", once it's inside the house, but it should be 3/4" at least from the meter. Also be sure that the "Tee" you are running it from is'nt the Tee the gas company uses and wants free and capped off the meter, if that is the only Tee available you need to get another Tee on there or the gas company will make you re-do it.

        And, galvanized should never be used on gas, only black iron, copper or gas flex.

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        • #5
          Thanks for the replies.

          I have read that galvanized pipe shouldn't be used with gas, but that is all I see here in Florida. The only time I see black pipe is on older houses. All the new construction houses use galvanized pipe. I do see short pieces of stainless and copper piping to make final connections, but I never see black iron pipe. I heard that the methods they used to galvanize the pipe caused flaking inside (which caused problems with valves and orifices, but I thought the process has been improved and galvanized is acceptable again. Can someone give me the reasoning behind not using galvanized pipe and why some areas still use it?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by fronty:
            Thanks for the replies.

            I have read that galvanized pipe shouldn't be used with gas, but that is all I see here in Florida. The only time I see black pipe is on older houses. All the new construction houses use galvanized pipe. I do see short pieces of stainless and copper piping to make final connections, but I never see black iron pipe. I heard that the methods they used to galvanize the pipe caused flaking inside (which caused problems with valves and orifices, but I thought the process has been improved and galvanized is acceptable again. Can someone give me the reasoning behind not using galvanized pipe and why some areas still use it?
            Fronty,

            I heard that years ago, that gal. pipe should not be used with gas because of the flaking. Here in California, we us the Uniform Plumbing Code, which specically allows gal. pipe for gas. About 15 years ago I asked a Southern California Gas Company rep. what the deal was. He told me it was an old myth many engineers held onto, but made no difference.

            If you have concerns, call your local gas supplier and ask.

            As far as a post I read about code not allowing a 1/2" branch, I can't tell you. In California we us the UPC, which has no minimum size other than using the sizing formula which would result in a 1/2" pipe being the smallest size. But, you need to check your local codes, and be aware that undersizing gas piping will result in a fixture that will not fire. Gas sizing can be critical. If you are not sure, and don't want to hire a competent plumber, over-size the pipe.

            the dog
            the dog

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