Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Cleanouts on Ejection line

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Cleanouts on Ejection line

    I have a commercial customer (Alabama) who has a lift station with approx 600 feet of 2" ejection line dumping into the municipal sewer. I have recently had to repair several broken cleanouts on this line, which has brought up a question...what effect do theses cleanouts have on friction loss and work load issues with the pump. The pump has a rise of no more than 7 feet, and a lateral run of approx 600 feet with 4 cleanouts/flap style check valves
    ( check valves installed just before each one-way cleanout), on a level run. The pump is Zoeller 1/2 hp, 2" eject. cast iron body, s/s impeller.
    Any thoughts? Thanks

  • #2
    helenaplumber, i don't know why they would have 4 check valves.

    that is a good enough issue to cause the system to have a sudden hammer effect. when the pump shuts off there will be a sudden stop in the forward motion causing all 4 check valves to slam shut. a 7' lift is very minimal for a check valve. how do you snake out the line with a check valve right there?

    is there a way to create the 7' lift at the start of the system and have the rest a gravity system?

    the only thing i can make of the 4 check valves is to lock in the waste in case of a blow out.

    rick.
    Last edited by PLUMBER RICK; 01-22-2006, 12:18 PM. Reason: typo. need spell check
    phoebe it is

    Comment


    • #3
      Is the Municipal sewer line also a forced main?
      Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

      Comment


      • #4
        response

        the line slowly rises all the way to the main, therefore, I presume that the check valves are there to prevent 600 feet of effluent from weighing on one check valve (in basin). Also, each check valve (as I stated in my original post), is in line BEFORE each one way cleanout, 150 feet apart, so snaking is not a problem. Also, the main is a gravity main, not a force main or lift station. Also, should I be concerned about friction loss over such a long run with cleanouts and check valves?
        Thanks!
        HelenaPlumber

        Comment


        • #5
          With only a lift of seven feet the friction will actually allow your pump to work better. There needs to be proper head pressure for the pump to work against so it can work properly.

          A properly installed cleanout will have a negligable effect on your systems operation. In fact in my state you would have been required to have 6 of them given the length of your run. That many check valves is probably a bit of overkill but if they are of good quality then they don't really hurt anything either.

          What is causing these cleanouts to be damaged? Were they installed too high?
          Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

          Comment


          • #6
            what is the piping material? what are the cleanouts? jim caps? the piping should be pressure rated for the non gravity portion of the system. jim caps will blow off with a quick acting shut off, like a check valve.

            the only reason i can think of for the 4 cleanouts is to allow for snaking without draining the whole system. the problem is, you can't snake past a check valve without getting stuck.

            the 7' lift, head pressure is minor. the 600' of waste water coming back into the pit is tremendous.

            personally i would hydro jet a 600' waste line that is level. a snake will only stir up the muck. a jetter will wash it out. also a jetter is much faster and less effort. not to mention a much better cleaning job.

            rick.
            phoebe it is

            Comment


            • #7
              cleanout info

              cleanouts are being damaged due to unfortunate location next to a driveway with underpaid/underskilled bobcat/forklift drivers nearby. The cost of relocating cleanouts or relocating the line is excessive, so my customer will just pay me to keep repairing them. They say that they will install concrete pylons to protect them, but that hasn't happened yet. The line is pvc/sch 40.
              Thanks!

              Comment


              • #8
                glad we know now the rest of the story.

                the c/o are being broken by the bobcat operators, not from the operation of the pump or check valves.

                we can't use any plastic in exposed locations. are they using dwv fittings (sweep) or water (short turn) type fittings with the 2'' sch. 40 pvc pipe?

                rick.
                phoebe it is

                Comment


                • #9
                  We're using pressure fittings for this line. 2" sch40. Just got called out again today on ANOTHER c/o on same line....it's good to be a plumber...

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X