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  • clogged drain

    I need your help, I've got a kitchen on the main floor of home that is connected to same drain as laundry tub in basement...Now it seems that when i use the kitchen sink the water backs up in both the kitchen sink and the laundry tub..I've tried to power rod the drain with a 3/4" 100ft sewer snake but the bits that came with the sewer snake were way to large b/c the drain is only about 2" thick. I only was able to fit in the spade bit but as I was doing so the float or valve inside the drain disappeared. To be honest with you I'm really not sure what that specific piece is...I was able to go the full 100ft and removed alot of grease but the drain is still clogged.

  • #2
    confused1,
    It sounds like you have two different clogs that might be showing up at the same time. Your kitchen sink is backing up on the main floor which I assume is ground level and your laundry tub is backing up in the basement which is beneath the main floor. If it was just one stoppage it would all be coming up either the kitchen sink or the laundry tub. Now the showings might be remnants of the same stoppage just different locations. What I would do is pull the trap on the kitchen sink since it sounds like it is above the laundry tub and snake it pretty far out. If that laundry tub line is connected like you say that should knock out both stoppages in one whack. But a 3/4" snake is way too big to be using on this. Try getting a smaller machine with a 3/8" or a 5/16" or maybe even 1/2" cable. As for the float or valve that you are speaking of, were you going thru a floor drain? I know they put plastic balls in floor drains for protection against city sewer backups and sewer backups. When a sewer backs up it pushes the ball upwards and acts as blockade so it doesn't flood the house. Other than that I'm not sure what other kind of float or valve would be in the way of running a snake thru the line. If you were running from a floor drain with a ball in it, there should have been a small cleanout cap on the side of the floor drain you could remove and run the line so you don't have to take the ball out or ruin it. You could always try running a smaller cable(as mentioned above) down the kitchen sink roof vent also. Just be careful not to come up the p-trap for the kitchen sink. It's all in knowing how far the cable has been pushed down the vent before turning it on and also in the feel of the cable. Good luck to you.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by draintech1
      confused1,
      It sounds like you have two different clogs that might be showing up at the same time. Your kitchen sink is backing up on the main floor which I assume is ground level and your laundry tub is backing up in the basement which is beneath the main floor. If it was just one stoppage it would all be coming up either the kitchen sink or the laundry tub. Now the showings might be remnants of the same stoppage just different locations. What I would do is pull the trap on the kitchen sink since it sounds like it is above the laundry tub and snake it pretty far out. If that laundry tub line is connected like you say that should knock out both stoppages in one whack. But a 3/4" snake is way too big to be using on this. Try getting a smaller machine with a 3/8" or a 5/16" or maybe even 1/2" cable. As for the float or valve that you are speaking of, were you going thru a floor drain? I know they put plastic balls in floor drains for protection against city sewer backups and sewer backups. When a sewer backs up it pushes the ball upwards and acts as blockade so it doesn't flood the house. Other than that I'm not sure what other kind of float or valve would be in the way of running a snake thru the line. If you were running from a floor drain with a ball in it, there should have been a small cleanout cap on the side of the floor drain you could remove and run the line so you don't have to take the ball out or ruin it. You could always try running a smaller cable(as mentioned above) down the kitchen sink roof vent also. Just be careful not to come up the p-trap for the kitchen sink. It's all in knowing how far the cable has been pushed down the vent before turning it on and also in the feel of the cable. Good luck to you.
      couldn't say it any better.

      just another suggestion. if it's grease and laundry soap, lint. i like a jetter to clean and wash away this debri.

      otherwise draintec said it all.

      rick.
      phoebe it is

      Comment


      • #4
        oh man.. i dont feel like renting the sewer snake again.. anybody know of a good cheap plumber in the chicagoland area.. but thanks for all the input

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        • #5
          Originally posted by confused1
          oh man.. i dont feel like renting the sewer snake again.. anybody know of a good cheap plumber in the chicagoland area.. but thanks for all the input
          I hope you won't take this the wrong way but you're unwilling to attempt, for the second time, that nasty, disgusting, stinkin' drain job because not only did you discover how nasty, disgusting, and stinkin' the job is but you also realised that you really have no idea what you're doing, so you understand that you need a professionals help to solve your problem but, oh yeah, he has to be "cheap". You ought to pay him whatever he asks and if it were me, it would cost you $49.00 to park my truck in front of your house and an absolute minimum of $149.00 to clear the drain (possibly more depending on what I saw when I got there) and when I was through you should take my advice and purchase a 1 year supply of biological drain treatment (another $49.00) which will do absolutely nothing for you today but if used properly will help prevent you from having to call me back in 6 months to a year for the same problem. And then when that professional is in and out of your house in probably well under an hour and you're tempted to grumble about him being there for less than an hour and walking away with your check for $250.00 or more, remember how much time and money you wasted with that nasty, disgusting, stinkin' job which you failed to have any success with "doing it yourself". Don't get mad, just understand that a professional is worth every penny he makes. There is no reason why he should be "cheap".

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          • #6
            ECS - not very kind, but very very well put .

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by confused1
              a good cheap plumber
              That is an oxymoron. There is no such thing as a good cheap plumber. One of the other guys in this forum - someone will have to remind me who it was - stated that there are three kinds of plumbing:
              Quality Plumbing
              Cheap Plumbing
              and Emergency Plumbing - They are not interchangeable with each other.

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