Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Tightening a Threaded Flange

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by ToUtahNow
    Hey I was on the bottom two rungs of the ladder and after only 21- months and two major surgeries I can almost walk normal again.

    Mark
    marc, i once steped off the wrong end of a little 2 step, step ladder. glad i was only 2' off the ground. almost all of my ladders are double sided wood type 1a. i've installed many large 6'' d/i valves with a man on each side and the valve on top. i think you could support a man on each rung with these ladders.

    i could never get used to the sprinkler fitters ladders. might be good to support pipe, but tuff on the feet and arches.

    rick.
    phoebe it is

    Comment


    • #17
      Rick,

      All of my ladders are the heavy Little Giant ladders. My problem was I used my son-in-laws Werner fiberglass ladder. When the pipe broke loose the ladder flexed and my leg went inside the ladder. If I had been on one of my ladders I would have never fallen.

      Mark
      "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

      I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

      Comment


      • #18
        2 wrongs for sure don't make it right

        I could tell you some stories that would curl your hair. Well OK, if you insist. Back when I had to work for a livin' (retired power plant mechanic/machinist) I saw some otherwise fairly intelligent people do some indredibly stupid things. Two of the safety rules we had were no standing on the top 2 steps of a step ladder (of course) and no standing on an overturned 5 gal bucket. So, I'm walkin' thru the plant one day and what do I see? A 200 lb guy standing on a 5 gal bucket which is on top of a 12' stepladder! (No safety harness either, not that that would have mitigated his stupidity) I started to say somethin' when his supervisor came from the opposite direction. It was not a pleasant conversation. He got 2 weeks off without pay. Oh yeah. He was an electrician. A licensed, qualified, experienced, professional electrician.
        Lorax
        "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by AZPlumber
          Chain vise and pipe wrench?

          Yeah I know about the two bolt and wedge a pipe wrench between the two and turn. I guess I was realy wondering if there realy is a tool out there. Apparently yes.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK
            az. a little common sense would tell you that what they did was alot more than fudging a wrench. if it took several guys and a cheater on a 4'-5' wrench they had a serious problem. an accident waiting to happen.

            Rick I've seen countless wrenches get tweaked and bent with cheaters just with one guy. Trying to torque off old boiler dialectrics, whatever. It ruins the wrenches over time and I'd just rather not do it. I have pipe wrenches of all sizes going up to 60"...if I can't accomplish what I want with THAT, it's time to re-think the approach. I understand where you're coming from though, sometimes it's just too convenient in a pickle?

            Comment


            • #21
              While cheaters are not a good idea I have used them a half dozen or so times in my life. the first two times were on an aluminum Ridgid pipe wrench and the wrench broke both times. (both times were in the 70s and the supplier replaced them no questions asked) Never broke a good heavy steel wrench though.
              Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

              Comment


              • #22
                Utah,

                it would be good to see the picture of your flange wrench.

                This thread just gave me an idea for a very easy to make tool that would be so much safer than the way 90% of plumbers/fitters do it.
                Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by plumber
                  Utah,

                  it would be good to see the picture of your flange wrench.

                  This thread just gave me an idea for a very easy to make tool that would be so much safer than the way 90% of plumbers/fitters do it.

                  I already have a idea and it's in the works. It will eliminate slips and and knucke busters.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by plumber
                    Utah,

                    it would be good to see the picture of your flange wrench.

                    This thread just gave me an idea for a very easy to make tool that would be so much safer than the way 90% of plumbers/fitters do it.

                    I already have a idea and it's in the works. It will eliminate slips and and knucke busters.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      I hate to burst a bubble here, but threaded flanges are not used that much any more. Having worked extensively in pipe-fitting, the only times I ever used threaded flanges was to transition off of a machine. In that case a set of flange pins (made by someone like "Flange Wizard") give a beefy set of points for a bar. I'm not sure there is a market for the tool described above.

                      On the other hand I am a tool fanatic, so I would probably buy one. But, hey, what the hell do I know?
                      the dog

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by plumbdog10
                        I hate to burst a bubble here, but threaded flanges are not used that much any more. Having worked extensively in pipe-fitting, the only times I ever used threaded flanges was to transition off of a machine. In that case a set of flange pins (made by someone like "Flange Wizard") give a beefy set of points for a bar. I'm not sure there is a market for the tool described above.

                        On the other hand I am a tool fanatic, so I would probably buy one. But, hey, what the hell do I know?
                        I'm with dog in that flanges are seldom used anymore. The only time I use them now is in Utah for large tank flanges or on 6"+ assemblies for our water company.

                        Mark.
                        "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                        I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Utah,

                          I want to make clear I said "threaded flanges". Weld flanges are used extensively, and were used by me in large high pressure air lines, etc.

                          I know what you meant, but I have to clarify myself so I don't have to be blasted again.
                          the dog

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            dog,

                            Thanks, I understood what you meant but you're right I did not make it clear in my post.

                            Mark
                            "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                            I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X