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  • Tightening a Threaded Flange

    Hey Everybody

    I,m new to the forum. I was hoping someone can tell me the best way to tighten a threaded flange onto a threaded piece of pipe. Maybe a 4" Threaded companion flange. Is there a special tool out there that would do this?

    Having a hard time tightening flanges...JMack

  • #2
    Chain vise and pipe wrench?

    Comment


    • #3
      Stick a couple bolts in two of the flange bolt holes and use a 24" wrench to turn it onto the pipe which is clamped in a pipe vise.
      ---------------
      Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
      ---------------
      “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
      ---------
      "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
      ---------
      sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Bob D.
        Stick a couple bolts in two of the flange bolt holes and use a 24" wrench to turn it onto the pipe which is clamped in a pipe vise.
        i second this, but maybe a 36'' wrench or a 24 with a cheater

        rick
        phoebe it is

        Comment


        • #5
          Cheaters are dangerous and should be avoided.

          Comment


          • #6
            I use an adjustable companion flange wrench when I have too. Mine will adjust for 4" through 8" flanges.

            Mark
            "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

            I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by ToUtahNow
              I use an adjustable companion flange wrench when I have too. Mine will adjust for 4" through 8" flanges.

              Mark
              Yea,

              The same way I use the pipe-stretcher when I cut that pipe too short.

              Back to reality:

              I agree with the above. Use a couple of bolts (or, if you are an old fitter like me, a couple of flange-aligners, which are beefier and hold a wrench better) and use a pipe wrench or bar to tighten.

              As to using cheaters on a pipe wrench being unsafe: not if you have a quality wrench and a pipe for a cheater that is sized to fit far over the handle.
              the dog

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by plumbdog10
                Yea,

                The same way I use the pipe-stretcher when I cut that pipe too short.

                Back to reality:

                I agree with the above. Use a couple of bolts (or, if you are an old fitter like me, a couple of flange-aligners, which are beefier and hold a wrench better) and use a pipe wrench or bar to tighten.

                As to using cheaters on a pipe wrench being unsafe: not if you have a quality wrench and a pipe for a cheater that is sized to fit far over the handle.
                I was being serious, I have a ratching wrench for companion flanges. I've had it for about 25-years and when I got it it was brand new but had been sitting at the tool place for many many years. It was a used tool store named Rose Tools and Joe Rose told me he didn't know what it was for. When I told him what it was for (I guested right) he told me he was tired of storing it so he gave it to me.

                If you can imagine it looks like a large bed warming pan with a 3-foot handle. The head is about 14" round and 4" deep. It has two sliding bars which you can thread different size dowels into depending on the bolt hole size.

                To use the wrench you adjust the sliding bars to line up with two holes in the flange and you tighten the flange. With the exception of the bars, handle and cogs it is all aluminum but still it is pretty heavy.

                Mark
                "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by ToUtahNow
                  I was being serious, I have a ratching wrench for companion flanges. I've had it for about 25-years and when I got it it was brand new but had been sitting at the tool place for many many years. It was a used tool store named Rose Tools and Joe Rose told me he didn't know what it was for. When I told him what it was for (I guested right) he told me he was tired of storing it so he gave it to me.

                  If you can imagine it looks like a large bed warming pan with a 3-foot handle. The head is about 14" round and 4" deep. It has two sliding bars which you can thread different size dowels into depending on the bolt hole size.

                  To use the wrench you adjust the sliding bars to line up with two holes in the flange and you tighten the flange. With the exception of the bars, handle and cogs it is all aluminum but still it is pretty heavy.

                  Mark

                  Utah,

                  I still think you're pulling a fast one, but if you have one, that's interesting. To be honest with you, I really don't see the need, but if I was there, I would have bought it.
                  the dog

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    dog,

                    When I developed our water company up in Utah I took all of my big equipment up there and left it. I figured that's the only place where I work with 6" pipe any more. The next time I go up there I'll go by my shop and take some picturs of it. It is definitly a different type of tool.

                    Mark
                    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ToUtahNow
                      dog,

                      When I developed our water company up in Utah I took all of my big equipment up there and left it. I figured that's the only place where I work with 6" pipe any more. The next time I go up there I'll go by my shop and take some picturs of it. It is definitly a different type of tool.

                      Mark
                      Pictures are not necessary, I believe you. But I would like to see it, out of curiosity.
                      the dog

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by AZPlumber
                        Cheaters are dangerous and should be avoided.
                        within reason is accetable. you don't put a 5' piece of pipe on a 24'' wrench. actually a 24'' wrench won't grip a 4'' pipe. i've used a piece of barstock with 2 bolts to engage it in place.

                        so is standing on the top 2 rungs of a ladder. we all do it, with caution.

                        (sorry mark)

                        rick.
                        phoebe it is

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by PLUMBER RICK

                          so is standing on the top 2 rungs of a ladder. we all do it, with caution.

                          (sorry mark)

                          rick.
                          Hey I was on the bottom two rungs of the ladder and after only 21- months and two major surgeries I can almost walk normal again.

                          Mark
                          "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                          I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by plumbdog10
                            Yea,

                            The same way I use the pipe-stretcher when I cut that pipe too short.

                            Back to reality:

                            I agree with the above. Use a couple of bolts (or, if you are an old fitter like me, a couple of flange-aligners, which are beefier and hold a wrench better) and use a pipe wrench or bar to tighten.

                            As to using cheaters on a pipe wrench being unsafe: not if you have a quality wrench and a pipe for a cheater that is sized to fit far over the handle.
                            There was an accident in Texas if I recall, in an oil drilling op, where it was routine and even company approved to use "cheater" bars when the drill would get stuck. They would use a 48 or 60" wrench with a cheater and several guys would torque on it. The wrench snapped and took a guy's head off, to put it bluntly. When contacted, Ridgid flatly exclaimed that they do NOT condone the use of NOR are their wrenches engineered for the use of cheaters. End of subject. Use them at your own risk. I prefer to use the RIGHT tool for the job.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by AZPlumber
                              There was an accident in Texas if I recall, in an oil drilling op, where it was routine and even company approved to use "cheater" bars when the drill would get stuck. They would use a 48 or 60" wrench with a cheater and several guys would torque on it. The wrench snapped and took a guy's head off, to put it bluntly. When contacted, Ridgid flatly exclaimed that they do NOT condone the use of NOR are their wrenches engineered for the use of cheaters. End of subject. Use them at your own risk. I prefer to use the RIGHT tool for the job.
                              az. a little common sense would tell you that what they did was alot more than fudging a wrench. if it took several guys and a cheater on a 4'-5' wrench they had a serious problem. an accident waiting to happen.

                              on my aluminum wrenches i have rubber bike grips on the end of the handles for comfort and to prevent a cheater on the alum. wrenches. the steel wrenches are still good to go. what i use is a piece of electrical emt tubing. this will bend much easier than the wrench. in 25+ years of doing this, i've never broken a ridgid wrench. i have broken channel locks in my hand. but then again i don't have 4 oilmen working with me

                              infact today i used a 14'' with a cheater to get 65 year old 1.25'' pipe apart. anything bigger, the jaws would have been too wide. infact my favorite wrench is a 10'' with 3/4'' emt cheater hammered on. this is my all time favorite when i had to hook up fireplaces and remove the cap ups in a 4'' high access panel. a real knuckle saver. probably is 20+ years old.

                              like anything else. common sense and experiance will save your butt, knuckles and even your teeth

                              rick.
                              phoebe it is

                              Comment

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