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  • Seeking drain plug removal tool

    Can anyone recommend a tool to remove a brass plug from a drain cleanout? The plug is about 4 inches round and features a 1-1/8" square protrusion.

    Many people seem to have this in their yards and/or homes and I figure that there must be a tool to remove a tight one. A 1-1/8" square socket and breaker bar should work nicely if anyone can recommend a source or manufacturer.

  • #2
    I HAVE A FULL SET OF CLEANOUT PLUG REMOVERS. THEY ARE BASICALLY A SET OF DIFFERENT SIZES OF SQUARE TUBING. THEY ATTACH TO A 3/4'' DRIVE BREAKER BAR. ALSO COMES WITH FLAT BAR STOCK FOR RECESSED C/O. YOU CAN MAKE THE SIZE YOU NEED OUT OF A PIECE OF SQUARE TUBING. PROBABLY GET A SCRAP PIECE OF 1.25'' OD. OR 1.375'' OD SQUARE TUBING. MAKE SURE IT'S LONG ENOUGH TO PUT A WRENCH ON IT TO BRING IT UP TO A GOOD LEVEL TO WORK. ALSO TRY BANGING ON THE FITTING TO BREAK IT LOOSE. TRY TO TIGHTEN IT FIRST TO BREAK IT LOOSE. MAYBE SOME HEAT WILL HELP TOO. WORSE CASE USE A SAWZALL TO CUT THE PLUG INTO THIRDS TO REMOVE AND THEN INSTALL A NEW PLASTIC PLUG THAT WILL COME OUT IN THE FUTURE.

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    • #3
      The brass plugs are very soft so be prepared when the nut or protrusion rounds off under pressure. Drill a 3/8 hole into the nut and have a bucket nearby incase the line is full of unpleasant liquids and semi solids.

      If you have a good cold chisel and a ball peen hammer you can punch a hole into the plug just above the protrusion (that is also where I reccomend drilling the test hole). After you have made your first hole take your chisel and try to drive the plug counter clockwise. This will either break the plug free and allow it to be unscrewed or enlarge the hole. If the plug is still not free take your chisel and align it at the very top of the plug. There should be one or two threads of the plug still outside of the cleanout fitting. Use your ball peen hammer and drive straight down on the plug. This will cause the soft brass to bulge down towards the hole you previously made with your chisel. Once you have driven the top of the plug down and away from the threads you should be able to pull the rest of the plug directly out of the cleanout. This method will do a surprisingly good job of protecting your female threads and allow for easy reinsertion of a new plug.

      When you install your new plug use a liberal amount of thread seal and DO NOT over tighten the plug. Just make it "snug". If the female threads do not allow for a good seal do to being worn then there are a number of rubber expanding plugs that will do a good job and allow for removal in the future.

      Wear good non permeable rubber gloves and saftey goggles.

      [ 04-22-2005, 10:33 PM: Message edited by: plumber ]
      Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

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