Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
Water Heater Piping Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Water Heater Piping

    My gas water heater leaked and I had to replace it.

    The new one came with steel plated 3/4" x 2" nipples with a plactic lining and a rubber flapper.

    I was told not to use them but to use brass nipples instead. I was told that this is a better job.

    Are the brass nipples beter than the nipples that came with the water heater?

  • #2
    Originally posted by tkb:
    My gas water heater leaked and I had to replace it.

    The new one came with steel plated 3/4" x 2" nipples with a plactic lining and a rubber flapper.

    I was told not to use them but to use brass nipples instead. I was told that this is a better job.

    Are the brass nipples beter than the nipples that came with the water heater?
    Water heaters often come with these nipples, I personaly throw them out, use brass nipples and diaelectric unions for maximum protection against electrolisis. I may be a fanatic, but let's see what the other experts say.

    the dog
    the dog

    Comment


    • #3
      Either way will work. On residential I choose to leave the original nipples from the factory installed. The hot water outlet nipple often has a somewhat effective heat trap installed inside the nipple itself. The dip tube on the cold water intake should not be affected by changing the nipples

      The larger commercial units are usually shipped with short, capped nipples. Sometimes installed, sometimes loose in the crate. I always remove these and install new nipples that have not been banged around in shipping. It has eliminated callbacks. Even then I use galvanized and then a die-electric union.
      Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

      Comment


      • #4
        This question really has quite a bit more to it then it seems.

        If the nipples are the factory installed nipples and I am installing the heater with water heater flexes I leave the factory nipples in.

        If the nipples are loose and I am installing the water heater with water heater flexes I will install the heat-trap nipples. However, if they are just the isolating nipples I will install brass nipples.

        Regardless as to whether the nipples came installed or not, if I am installing the water heater with hard piped copper, I use a 3/4" SXMIP boiler union and no nipples.

        One other point, anytime I am installing male threads into the female fittings at ther top of the water heater I look for residual glass in the threads. If there is any glass in the threads I chase the threads before installing the new nipples.

        Mark
        "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

        I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

        Comment


        • #5
          "If there is any glass in the threads I chase the threads before installing the new nipples."

          Mark, where does the glass end up at when you chase the threads?

          Comment


          • #6
            Based on the question, I was refering to residential (or small commercial heaters).On commercial heaters, I leave the factory installed nipples in, but use diaelectric unions to make my connection. I rarely use flexes, even on residential, due to force of habit.

            the dog
            the dog

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Bob D.:
              "If there is any glass in the threads I chase the threads before installing the new nipples."

              Mark, where does the glass end up at when you chase the threads?
              The same place it ends up when you screw a nipple into the top of the tan. However the glass is very thin and turns to a powder.

              The reason I chase the thread (if needed) is I want the fittings to tighten up because of the fitment of the fittings not because of debri in the threads. You can also damage your starting threads if the glass is too bad.

              Mark
              "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

              I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by plumbdog10:
                Based on the question, I was refering to residential (or small commercial heaters).On commercial heaters, I leave the factory installed nipples in, but use diaelectric unions to make my connection. I rarely use flexes, even on residential, due to force of habit.

                the dog
                The only time my shop installed flexes out here is when the house was plumbed in galvanize with flexes to begin with.

                Mark
                "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                Comment


                • #9
                  lets start off on the threads. my biggest dislike was when the heaters used to come with plastic shipping plugs hammered into the tank through the cardboard box. the plastic was always stripped onto the threads and flaked into the tank.
                  i finally met the crew at a trip to american appliance way back when they were in santa monica, ca. boy did i let them have it. i don't think any heater co. still ships the heaters this way. the glass overspray was minor compared to the plastic plugs.

                  now for the nipples. some heaters incorporate the dip tube and or a secondary anoide rod into the nipple. you have no choice but to leave them. on the normal everday heaters, i typically don't use the supplied heat trap nipples. after removing many dozens of them in the field due to lack of water or noise, you would too. the problem with the heat trap nipples are that they are very restrictive to start with. after some years of service they start to stick. then you get very little water through them. some will rattle too and cause noise.

                  a dielectric union is on a residential 3/4'' heater is junk. i's the first place to plug up. i will use a brass nipple and flex connector on the 3/4'' size. i switched back to copper flexes from the stainless braided that i used for years. the stainless are stating to develop a leak around the crimp and a few have blown out.
                  on the larger size heaters 1''- 2'', i use the male x copper brass unions that mark had mentioned. i tried the flex connectors on the large connections, but they were not that good and very expensive.
                  on 2.5'' and larger i use a dielectric flange union. typically these are on storage tanks.

                  one last note. the only place i use gal. steel nipples anymore is on gas. the nipples i use for water have been brass for 10 years or more. galvanized steel is not what it use to be from years ago.

                  rick.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Wow I forgot about those hammer in plugs American use to use. The worst part was when you went to unscrew them and the tops would snap off leaving the bottom half of the plug still in the heater..

                    Mark
                    "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                    I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      As a side note, I read the other day where Watts is coming out with SS flexes that have an automatic shut-off to protect against flooding. Anyone seen these?

                      the dog
                      the dog

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by plumbdog10:
                        As a side note, I read the other day where Watts is coming out with SS flexes that have an automatic shut-off to protect against flooding. Anyone seen these?

                        the dog
                        They are only made for fixtures and not water heaters. The idea seems sound but it works off of the gpm expected. In other words if some decides to take out their flow restrictors it may turn off the flex.

                        I also wonder how hard water and such will affect the parts in the flex over time. I guess if it doesn't work though you are in the same position as not having anything to begin with.

                        Mark
                        "Somewhere a Village is Missing Twelve Idiots!" - Casey Anthony

                        I never lost a cent on the jobs I didn't get!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          mark, i had a conversation this week about the same issues.
                          brasscraft makes a gas flex with an excess flow shut off built in. this will work if the line is truly ruptured. it should continue to work years down the line as gas is not corrosive. but the line has to be ruptured and flowing full to shut.

                          now for the water flexes i've already seen for dishwaser and washing machine flexes. JUNK.
                          they are a gimmick that will function the first year then either plug and not supply water to the fixture, or will not function as promised down the road. they can't make a angle stop that will hold up to hard water. too many rocket scientists, not enough real-life plumbers.
                          if they really want to do accelerated testing, let them try installing some in beverly hills. a good quality faucet is junk in a hand full of years there. the water is much harder there than los angeles.

                          i have a plumbing topic marketing research panel this week. i'll let you know what is up for discussion end of the week.


                          rick.

                          [ 10-23-2005, 12:18 PM: Message edited by: PLUMBER RICK ]

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Rick, the flexes I was refering to were apparently new products by Watts. I just wanted information, I don't know if what you are refering to is the same. If you have knowledge of this please be more specific.

                            I understand that you seem to be a little toasted, and don't care. I would like your opinion, if you have experience with these new flexes, when you are in a position to think, because I respect your opinion.

                            the dog
                            the dog

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              watts vacuum breakers on water heaters. the bride and i just spent 2 weeks at cape cod mass. where i,m from.
                              rented a great little place on the beach. the code in mass. is vac. breakers on all w.h.. the idea is if i main breaks, the tank won,t colapes. the black rubbers in my stainless s. w.h. supplies are leaching black oiley residue in the tub! will switch to copper flex. no flex in mass. i thought flex in ca was code for e quakes
                              I can build anything You want , if you draw a picture of it , on the back of a big enough check .

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X